Posts Tagged ‘Jagjaguwar Records’

Image may contain: 1 person

Rock’n’roll evolves, shifts, mutates—and persists. Anyone who doubts this need only listen to “Seventeen” which performs the magic trick of weaving a classic-sounding song out of strands and blocks of textures that never quite existed in music’s “classic rock” heyday. A heavy beat offsets a desultory piano line, synthesizers at once ferocious and distant blaze around the edges, guitars eventually squonk onto the scene, all while Van Etten sings poetically of longing, nostalgia, and destiny—lyrics at once concrete and slippery, a deft interweaving of adult and teen-aged introspection that as a listener you intuit more than comprehend. The song rumbles and, eventually, roars. A master of subtle melodic gestures, Van Etten along the way crafts a chorus that slays with muted glory.

You can hear Bruce Springsteen in the anthemic energy of this song, and while I get the comparison, leaving it at that diminishes Van Etten’s accomplishment. The entire album in fact strikes my ear as a brilliant example of how to be a 21st-century rock’n’roller—taking the bones of archetypal rock music , and then planting your own individual 2019 self, with all its accumulated know-how and influences, right into the heart of it. Since we last heard from Sharon Van Etten (2014’s Are We There), she has become an actor, a film composer, a mother, and a graduate student in psychology. Which is just to say that she has quite a formidable self to align with one type of creative expression or another. When it came time to record a new album, she opted for a producer, John Congleton, known for synth-pop stylings, and arrived at the studio inspired by the dark, reverberant music of Portishead and Nick Cave. Something arresting was bound to come of all of this, and it did in the form of the enigmatic but majestic Remind Me Tomorrow, which was released in January on Jagjaguwar Records. That’s where you’ll find “Seventeen.”.

You can listen to Remind Me Tomorrow, and then buy it, on Bandcamp, where it is available digitally, on CD, or on vinyl. And in case you missed it, another song from the album, the brilliant “No One’s Easy To Love,”.

Advertisements

Foxygen have announced a brand new album. Titled ‘Seeing Other People’, the full-length is previewed by a lead single ‘Livin’ A Lie’, Arriving alongside a video directed by previous collaborator Alessandra Lichtenfeld, it was filmed in Calabasas and the band’s hometown of Westlake Village, California following the Woolsey wildfires.

“I remember a quote from [fellow band member Jonathan] Rado sticking with the press a few years ago about how we’d lived every rock’n’roll cliche in, about, one year,” Sam France explains in a statement. “Well, here’s the album about it. Another movie. I don’t know what’s next. But here’s a snapshot of it all.”

‘Seeing Other People’ was produced by Foxygen, mixed by Shawn Everett, and features drums by Jim Keltner. Following on from 2017’s ‘Hang’, its set for release on 26th April

Californian duo Foxygen has released Livin’ a Lie, which layers a myriad of instruments from synths to guitars and strings. The track is the first glimpse of “Seeing Other People”, their upcoming album due out 26th April.  on Jagjaguwar Records

Image may contain: 1 person, text and close-up

Image may contain: 1 person, sitting, indoor and close-up

Sharon Van Etten’s full length album, Are We There, was released in 2014, but she’s been anything but idle in the time since. She tried her hand at acting with a role on The OA, and appeared at The Bang Bang Bar on an episode of Twin Peaks: The Return (as well as playing David Lynch’s Festival of Disruption). That’s not the only musical project she’s been involved with, either; she lent vocals to music from Lee Ranaldo, Land of Talk, Hercules & Love Affair, Michael Cera, and Lost Horizons. She also scored Strange Weather, appeared on the soundtrack for The Man in High Castle, and re-released her 2009 debut, Because I Was in Love. We may be able to expect even more new music from Sharon who Also became a mother .In an interview with The Creative Independent that was published last November, she said she was heading back to the studio “next week.” The interview also talks about how motherhood is inspiring her writing now,

The motivation behind the re-release was related to music people heard on The OA, her getting her masters back, and just perfect timing in general: “During this off time, where I probably won’t have a record out for another year, why not share something that will feel new to people? Why not remind people where I came from a little bit, before I scare them with my next record?” We promise we won’t be scared!

“Seventeen” off Sharon Van Etten’s new album “Remind Me Tomorrow” out Jan 18th on Jagjaguwar Records

Image may contain: 4 people, people on stage, people playing musical instruments and indoor

Preoccupations kick things off on a decidedly ‘80s note with “Espionage,” the synths, skeletal beat, and Matt Flegel’s dramatic vocals sounding like a twisted, bleaker version of Depeche Mode. It’s dark and grinding, but still so danceable it could be an alternate soundtrack the scene in The Breakfast Club where they’re all gettin’ down cue Judd Nelson hanging off of that weird hand statue thing. On “Decompose,” the unrelenting, singular beat from Mike Wallace’s drums and the solitary, swiped chord of some kind of eastern harp are softened by Flegel’s pointedly dreamy vocals, the only relief from the cyclical, driving rhythm getting beaten in to your skull. Sonically, “Disarray” takes a nod or two from the “Disorder” version of Joy Division. Lyrically, it’s a study in harnessing the chaos and discord of life, while acknowledging the futility of doing so. Flegel sings the title over and over, making a pattern of a word whose definition means exactly the opposite.

The members of Preoccupations have always confidently followed their own rules as they straddle the line between humanity and the brutish force of their music. Examinations of creation, destruction and the ways that we often practice the two in vain have regularly been tethered to the Canadian post-punk band’s work—even going back to their days as Viet Cong. And while that’s quite a downcast undertaking, it’s one that goes hand-in-hand with Preoccupations’ dystopian-future-sounding music. With their third LP, New Material, they dive into it headlong, kicking things off on a decidedly ’80s note with “Espionage,” the synths, skeletal beat, and Flegel’s dramatic vocals sounding like a twisted, bleaker version of Depeche Mode. It’s dark and grinding, but still so danceable it could be an alternate soundtrack the scene in The Breakfast Club where they’re all gettin’ down—cue Judd Nelson hanging off of that weird hand-statue thing.

Preoccupations – “Espionage” from ‘New Material’, out March 23rd, 2018 on Jagjaguwar Records.

Ruban Nielson’s Unknown Mortal Orchestra are band that always moved between psych-rock, frenetic sonics and oddball funk. Sex and Food finds a bit of everything of the band’s established sounds in there along but perhaps with everything pushed to the fringes or testing the limits somewhat. So there’s the aggressively-charged distorted rock of ‘American Guilt’ alongside the positively ’70s yacht rock tracks ‘Ministry of Alienation’ and ‘Everybody Acts Crazy Nowadays’. “When it comes to rock, I want to get into dodgier territory.”, is how Nielson has talked about the album.

Nielson’s voice remains as the peculiar whispering floating timbre. It’s a little creepy, a little laconic, and totally unique. With influences drawn from places he visited like Reykjavík, Seoul, Auckland, Hanoi and Mexico, away from the Portland home that informed much of his 2015 breakthrough record Multi-Love, Sex and Food ultimately, is like a patchwork of their sound to date.

Unknown Mortal Orchestra – “Everyone Acts Crazy Nowadays” from the album ‘Sex & Food’, Released April 6th, 2018 on Jagjaguwar. 

Image may contain: 1 person

Sharon Van Etten’s new single, “Jupiter 4”, is probably more likely to be named after a Roland Synth than a crack team of Jupiter bound astronauts. The track, shared this week, is the second to come from Sharon’s upcoming album, Remind Me Tomorrow, due early next year on Jagjaguwar Records.

If the first single, Comeback Kid, was probably the closest Sharon’s ever got to a pop-song, Jupiter 4 is a completely different beast, all moody drones, eerie noises and impending gloom; there’s a touch of The Twilight Sad about it, which is as exciting as it is confusing. Despite the dense musical accompaniment, the lyrical content seems to be quietly upbeat, a declaration of passion, “it’s true that everyone would like to have met, a love so real”,sure with the musical accompaniment it feels almost creepily intense, but taken as face value, Sharon’s words are unquestionably positive. We’ve heard two snap-shots of Sharon’s new album, both two different moods, two different directions, two reasons to be very excited where Sharon Van Etten takes us next.

Remind Me Tomorrow is out January 18th via Jagjaguwar.

Cut Worms is the nom de plume of songwriter Max Clarke, whose debut LP will seduce you right off the bat with its sparkling opening track, “How It Can Be.” With his intimate indie voice and facility for instantly memorable melodies and guitar lines, Clarke conjures a kind of garage-tested Everly Brothers, reminiscent of early Shins, with breezy pop ballads just tart enough to soundtrack lonesome summer days. Hollow Ground was recorded in the L.A. home studio of Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado, and in New York with Jason Finkel at Gary’s Electric. Check out the animated video for “Don’t Want To Say Good-bye,” and prepare to hum it for the rest of the day.

“Don’t Want To Say Good-bye” from debut LP “Hollow Ground” out May 4th on Jagjaguwar

Tons of Everly Brothers and Buddy Holly in Hollow Ground, which flies in the face of present day music. What’s wrong with this one man band Max Clarke and his compulsion of a bygone era? Who cares, when it sounds this good.

http://

“Cash For Gold” from debut LP “Hollow Ground” out May 4th on Jagjaguwar Records

Justin Vernon and Aaron Dessner Detail New Album as Big Red Machine.

Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon and the National’s Aaron Dessner have detailed their debut album as Big Red Machine. The self-titled LP is set to come out August 31st via their PEOPLE digital platform, as well as on vinyl, CD, and cassette in partnership with JagjaguwarBig Red Machine includes the four songs that Vernon and Dessner released last month (“Forest Green,” “Lyla,” “Gratitude,” and “Hymnostic”).

Vernon and Dessner developed Big Red Machine over the last two years. They produced the album together with frequent collaborator Brad Cook. Big Red Machine was recorded and mixed by Jonathan Low, mostly at Dessner’s Long Pond studio in upstate New York (where the National also recorded much of Sleep Well Beast).

In a press release, Dessner stated, “I don’t think the record would exist without the community that came together to make it.” He continued, “We took the music to a certain point, and then we reached out and sent it far and wide, inviting friends to contribute any and all ideas. We’ve viewed the record and the process from a community standpoint. We’re incredibly excited about it, as excited as we would be for any album we might make in another situation that’s more conventional. But this feels like something new the process felt different and the outcome felt different.”

Releases August 31st, 2018

Image may contain: 1 person, standing and suit

Cut Worms is the nom de plume of songwriter Max Clarke, whose debut LP “Hollow Ground” will seduce you right off the bat with its sparkling opening track, “How It Can Be.” With his intimate indie voice and facility for instantly memorable melodies and guitar lines, Clarke conjures a kind of garage-tested Everly Brothers, reminiscent of early Shins, with breezy pop ballads just tart enough to soundtrack lonesome summer days. Hollow Ground was recorded in the L.A. home studio of Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado, and in New York with Jason Finkel at Gary’s Electric. Check out the animated video for “Don’t Want To Say Good-bye,” and prepare to hum it for the rest of the day.

The first “official” single, Don’t Want to Say Good-bye, from the long lost/rumored/awaited Cut Worms album Hollow Ground

Brooklyn singer-songwriter Max Clarke relocated from Chicago to New York City in October 2015 and wasted no time breaking into the music scene with the release of his EP Alien Sounds in 2017. Listening to his unique style was like opening a time capsule from the ’60s and ’70s, and we were immediately hooked. Cut Worms creates a vintage ambiance that lowlights Max Clarkes’ bright and buoyant performance.

Cut Worms a carefree, wholesome sunniness that beckons to mind The Beach Boys gives Cut Worms a retro sound you didn’t know you’ve been missing.  Beatles-esque vocals, adding to the thrifty aesthetic. Cut Worms has flawlessly managed to capture the lo-fi nostalgia of a youthful counterculture, and we can’t wait to keep travelling time through his music. His full-length LP is scheduled for a May 2018 release and you can catch him on tour.

http://

Image may contain: 4 people, people standing, tree, plant, outdoor and nature

Nap Eyes are a remarkably consistent band. Their 2015 debut, Whine of the Mystic, contains nine tracks of breezy, itinerant indie rock that only occasionally rambles on too long. The follow-up, 2016’s Thought Rock Fish Scale, does more or less the same thing. So the question for these Canadian crypto-jammers is: mix it up on LP3 or nah? I’m Bad Now is another reliable work of songs from Nap Eyes, with stronger melodies and more consistency across the board.

Nap Eyes are a remarkably consistent band. Their 2015 debut, Whine of the Mystic, contains nine tracks of breezy, itinerant indie rock that only occasionally rambles on too long. The follow-up, 2016’s Thought Rock Fish Scale, does more or less the same thing. So the question for these Canadian crypto-jammers is: mix it up on LP3 or nah? I’m Bad Now is another reliable slab from Nap Eyes, with stronger melodies and more consistency across the board.

Band Members
Nigel Chapman, Seamus Dalton, Josh Salter, Brad “Bronson” Loughead,

Nap Eyes ‘I’m Bad Now’, out March 9th, 2018 on Paradise of Bachelors / You’ve Changed / Jagjaguwar’