Posts Tagged ‘New York’

KATE DAVIS – ” Trophy “

Posted: December 12, 2019 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Kate Davis picked up a violin at age five, a bass at age thirteen. She entered the Portland Youth Philharmonic before puberty, the Grammy Jazz Ensemble before adolescence. By the time she graduated high school, Kate won the Presidential Scholar in the Arts Award and a full ride to the Manhattan School of Music. By the time she graduated college, ASCAP’s Robert Allen Award and slots at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center. As a young adult, the virtuoso claimed enthusiastic endorsements from NPR, MTV, PBS and BBC as well as coveted invitations to the stage from Herbie Hancock, Ben Folds, Alison Krauss, Jeff Goldblum and the like. Most recently, she co-wrote Sharon Van Etten’s hit single “Seventeen.”

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On Trophy, Kate Davis embraces indie rock after an adolescence spent as a jazz darling. She uses her experiences in that world both as lyrical fodder—on “Cloud,” she imagines more typical teenage years—and to inform her unique music sensibility (“I Like Myself” incorporates elegant strings arrangements). Her instrumentation is complex, but all of it ultimately works to serve her distinct voice. On Trophy, Kate Davis has discovered herself at last.

Luna have a new digital EP that collects of of their recent limited 7″ singles released on Sonic Cathedral, PIAPTK and Feral Child. They include a few covers plus “Something in the Air” (with Sean Eden on lead vocal), instrumental “The Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt” (a pair of Luna original instrumentals) and a remix of “Gin.”

Postscripts collects Luna’s recent limited 7″ singles (now out of print) Among other tracks are “California Blue” (Roy Orbison), “Inside Your Heart” (Monochrome Set), “Lonesome Cowboy Bill” (VU),
released September 6th, 2019

Luna was formed in 1991 by Dean Wareham after the breakup of Galaxie 500, with Stanley Demeski of The Feelies and Justin Harwood of The Chills. Guitarist Sean Eden joined in 1994, Lee Wall replaced Demeski on drums in 1997, and Britta Phillips replaced Harwood on bass in 2000. Luna released their final album, “Rendezvous”, in 2005 after playing their final concert at the Bowery Ballroom in NYC.

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Maggie Rogers is back with a new song. The track, “Love You for a Long Time,” follows her nomination for Best New Artist at the 2020 Grammy Awards. Check out the song below.

This past January, Maggie Rogers released debut album “Heard It in a Past Life”. In a press release, Rogers said of the new track, “It’s a song about love in all its forms—romantic love, the love I feel for my friends, the love I feel for my band, and the love I’ve shared with all of you. I wanted it to sound like the last days of summer. I wanted it to sound as wild and alive as new love feels.

For a long time, I’ve introduced myself as a banjo player from the Eastern Shore of Maryland. I’m a hiker and an environmentalist. I’m an optimist. I’m loud.
I’m still all those things, but I went quiet for a few years. I cut my long hair short. I got a cat named Cat Stevens. I fell in love. I moved to New York,

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Purr began in 2017 as the second project from New York City born, raised and forever-based songwriting partners Eliza Barry Callahan and Jack Staffen. Today they announce the debut album “Like New”, produced by Jonathan Rado (Weyes Blood, Father John Misty, Whitney, The Lemon Twigs) which will be released on February 21st, 2020 via ANTI-Records.

The duo – who had previously captured attention releasing deft, stripped down, warm-toned pysch-pop under their names, Jack and Eliza – shifted to what naturally felt like their next musical gear. If Jack and Eliza showcased the songwriting prowess of a promising young duo (they are both still in their early twenties), then Purr lets Callahan’s and Staffen’s work bloom in the fertile ground of a fully realized soundscape. Purr builds upon an ageless, classic sound that at once looks at the past while leaning into their own, individual future – with Staffen’s and Callahan’s vocals humming at the center.

Like New was written in the band’s basement studio in downtown Manhattan, a repurposed storage space beneath a restaurant in the building where Callahan once lived as a young child—thanks to the goodwill of the very last kind landlord in New York City. In the territory of a New York City upbringing, Callahan sites her late close friend and old next-door neighbor, whom she met on the sidewalk when she was eight, the jazz guitarist Jim Hall, as her primary influence in music and life.

While the is band heavily rooted in New York City, the album was recorded at Rado’s East Los Angeles studio with and takes on a distinctly west coast feel which glows with a sunny warmth, whirrs with breeziness and is at times a little noir too. As Callahan and Staffen were working on the album opener “Hard to Realize,” they couldn’t stop hearing tubular bells in the full swell of the chorus. They rented a set from a nearby drum shop, only to learn upon their delivery that they were the exact bells used in the soundtrack for the 1933 classic, King Kong. As Hollywood ghosts swirl through Like New, Callahan and Staffen’s voices knit together forging at times what can eerily sound like one voice.

Callahan and Staffen write: “We wrote the songs that make up this album at the outset of a transitional and particularly uncertain moment in our lives. That early twenties tide change. New patterns took hold as we tried to hang onto old ones. The songs each have their own stories — but at the time they were collectively written, we were dealing with a push and pull between dependence on and independence from people we love, and coming to terms with our own self-expectations. We were resisting and (sometimes) accepting of the inevitable changes in our relationships and friendships, a moment, a specific and strange time in our lives…and, of course, in this… world. That thread was just naturally pulled through the songs.

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releases February 21st, 2020

Queens, New York outfit Wives have shared powerful new single ‘Waving Past Nirvana’.

The band’s debased, electronic-leanings recall post-punk and cold wave, while emphatically occupying a space of their own. With perhaps more in common with The Residents than, say, Joy Division, their bold sound is pinned down by lyrics that veer from absurdist humour to dense philosophical wisdom.

Snapped up by City Slang Records, Wives released the two-part seven inch single in May. ‘Waving Past Nirvana’ is all slo-mo synths, a chugging rhythm, and a leering vocal that actually references Buddhist philosophy.

Frontman Jay Beach offers: “‘Waving Past Nirvana’ is a literal interpretation of the bodhisattva—one who has achieved the release, the awakened eye, and yet wants to trade it back for the painful life of desire because she/he/they predominantly feels compassion. This ‘entering back into the world’ to fight a fool’s battle is the essence of ‘Waving Past Nirvana’, and the video depicts one young woman’s journey along these lines.”

The video was directed by Milah Libin (Beach Fossils, Princess Nokia), who adds: “When I listened to ‘Waving Past Nirvana’ it evoked the beauty and the mundane in a never-ending routine. The closeness to finding some sort of fulfilment, or ‘nirvana’, that keeps bringing one back. It happens to all types of people, but particularly in New York where the beat is so fast and so many come here searching. It’s not quite sad; there’s something admirable in that search – a sort of dedication.”

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Margaux is a singer-songwriter living between Seattle and Brooklyn, NY. Brooklynite, Margaux Bouchegnies, Aka simply Margaux to the record buying public, is set to release her lengthily titled debut EP, “More Brilliant Is The Hand that Throws the Coin”, next week. Ahead of that release, this week Margaux has shared her latest offering, “Cave In”.

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Cave In a fascinating game of two halves, starting life all airy and intricate, like those lo-fi early Angel Olsen recordings, before suddenly exploding into life at the fifty second mark when a rumble of claustrophobic bass slams into view. From there the track, starts to gently distort and warp, reinventing itself as a slice of emotive 90’s rock nodding to Julia Jacklin or Snail Mail. Lyrically, the track seems to deal with a futile attempt to reinvent yourself in the eyes of another, one second, “climbing out of somebody’s memory”, the next, “haunted by the same old, same thing, everything”. A track that’s got more intriguing ideas going on than many people’s whole albums, Margaux is arriving in style and doesn’t look like going anywhere.

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More Brilliant Is The Hand that Throws the Coin is out November 15th via Massif Records.

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U2’s second album, “October”, was released in October 1981. The October Tour ran from August 1981 to August 1982 split across five legs encompassing Europe and North America. This stunning performance broadcast from The Ritz, New York took place on 18th March 1982.

This deluxe vinyl edition is limited to 1000 copies only and is presented with a permanent heavy weight glass clear vinyl cover to provide permanent protection for your priceless album. The deluxe limited edition also includes a unique code that unlocks an amazing suite of digital companions to enhance your enjoyment of the music on the CD. Included here, a free 120 page e-book featuring the definitive guide to the lives and music of U2 – We Will Follow, containing QR codes which accesses a series of companion video podcasts to complement and enhance your enjoyment of the music on the album.

Setlist:

01. Gloria 0:00:00 02. Another Time, Another Place 0:04:50 03. I Threw A Brick Through A Window 0:09:03 04. A Day Without Me 0:13:06 05. An Cat Dubh / Into The Heart 0:16:29 06. Rejoice 0:24:08 07. Happy Birthday Adam / The Cry / The Electric Co. 0:27:50 08. I Fall Down 0:34:26 09. October 0:37:54 10. Tomorrow 0:40:13 11. I Will Follow 0:46:46 12. Twilight 0:50:51 13. Out Of Control 0:55:14 14. Fire 1:00:51 15. 11 O’Clock Tick Tock / Give Peace A Chance 1:04:28 16. The Ocean 1:10:22 17. Southern Man 1:14:49 18. A Celebration 1:20:11

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From Indian Lakes started out in 2009 as an emo band — an atmospheric, post-rock-leaning emo band, but an emo band nonetheless — and they eventually signed to Triple Crown Records and toured with bands like Balance & Composure, so they got pigeonholed into that whole “emo revival” thing. They’ve been clearly moving away from that for a while, though, and with “Dimly Lit” their most ambitious and genre-defying album yet  there’s really no way to pigeonhole them into anything. For this album, From Indian Lakes took a more DIY route than they’d taken since the early days. Frontman Joey Vannucchi wrote, recorded, and produced the whole thing himself in his apartment in Harlem, and they self-released the record, and just put the early singles out straight to the fans, without premieres or press releases or anything like that. If Dimly Lit ends up being referred to as a “hidden gem” or an “overlooked record” or something, that might be part of why.

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But DIY doesn’t mean rawer or more bare-bones in the case of Dimly Lit; it’s From Indian Lakes’ most expansive and collaborative album to date. Joey worked with a handful of impressive guest vocalists, including Half Waif’s Nandi Rose Plunket, Queen of Jeans’ Miriam Devora, PVRIS’ Lynn Gunn, Lemolo’s Meagan Grandall, and Tummyache’s Soren Bryce, and their voices all make for a nice contrast with Joey’s airy, boyish croon.

Instrumentally, it’s still an indie rock record, but synths are the driving force, and the result is just great electronic indie pop, the kind of thing that could appeal to fans of anything from The Postal Service to Imogen Heap to M83. Like those artists, Dimly Lit has an alluring synthy atmosphere on the surface, but at their core, these are singer/songwriter songs that would work just fine on an acoustic guitar. It’s easy to let the aesthetic do all the work with music that sounds this pretty, but From Indian Lakes always make sure there’s substance and depth in the mix too.

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Wives debut LP, “So Removed”, opens with the timely and befitting lyrics: “Happy ever after / this place is a disaster.” According to Jay Beach, the vocalist, guitarist and primary songwriter of the four-piece Wives, this is the track that best embodies their sound. It’s Drone-y, crammed with clever observations, and still catchy enough to make you forget the world is ending despite being told straight to your face. “Waving Past Nirvana” embraces my favorite sentence in the band’s bio, which describes the sentiment of their debut as “tethered to daily anxiety without resorting to cynicism.”

Wives’ creation story plays out much like their sound: a confident teetering and self-assured stumbling that somehow leads you to the exact right place. Beach, guitarist Andrew Bailey, drummer Adam Sachs, and bassist Alex Crawford were all embedded in New York’s DIY music scene working on their own music projects when the unraveling of a previous project and an uncanceled studio session lured them into the studio. Beach puts it succinctly, sharing, “It was a lot of fun and when we heard the tapes we were like, ‘Wow, that’s really good.’ So, we just became Wives.” The album was created over a two-year span of time with the friends taking advantage of stolen moments in the studio, never taking it too seriously and just following what felt and sounded right.

“When the four of us came together, it was definitely a unique sound none of us had hit on before in our other musical lives. I think everyone brings something quite unique to the table. I write songs that are, I guess, more traditional. Our bass player is a huge My Bloody Valentine fan, and his vibe is really shoegaze-ey, our guitar player is more modern. Our drummer Andrew is super into death metal and hip-hop. I know the sound of WIives makes a lot of sense because I know where everyone is coming from, but everyone is coming from separate places,” Beach explains.

The band got their start in Queens, New York City’s largest borough, and the nation’s most diverse large county. Much like Wives, it’s full of people coming from different places, but it plays out harmoniously.

“We have mad Queens love, and I think Queens is the best borough in New York by far,” Beach shares when asked about the backdrop of their start. “People are a little more chill in Queens; it’s a little more of a family vibe, and there are still many ethnic communities that are intact. There’s [a] flourishing Polish community and Eastern European community, little Bangladesh, little Nepal,” Beach says. “It’s like a good social experiment. Like let’s take the most diverse amount of people you can and, like, throw them into a place, and it mostly works out, you know?”

That organic coming together can be heard in tracks like “Even The Dead.” It’s anything but over-practiced or contrived; it’s exactly what you would hear live. “There are no overdubs, no nothing,” Beach shares when asked about the track. “We just started playing this one riff and went for it for those five minutes and recorded it on tape. That’s it. That’s the final track. Obviously that kind of lightning in a bottle doesn’t happen all the time. That’s rare. But when we have a piece, like, we really believe in, we just keep it. We don’t fuck with it. It might not be perfect. It might not be a No. 1 single but it has something, a spontaneity, that’s really hard to find.”

One of the albums poppier moments comes by way of “The 20 Teens.” Beach shares that while listening to A Flock of Seagulls playing at a Bushwick restaurant, he had the thought that all the lyrics might as well have been “This is the ’80s, this is the ’80s,” since the track seemed to embody the decade so well. He decided to square up to that track, and create his own version for the 2010s, full of references to people reading paper magazines and donning dungarees. The track starts with a sharp and inquisitive “some records are so twisted that they actually happened,” a line Beach found in an old journal he’d been writing in while listening to old 45s.

“You could say it’s positively ironic; I think in our songs there’s a strain of sweetness and nostalgia,” Beach says, and laughs, when I share that the songs seem like perfect listening for both pre-party and post-breakup. “Even though there’s also this stance of New York cynicism, it’s in there too,” he adds.

There’s something in the way Beach sings that makes your ears perk up. Like Lou Reed from a pulpit, it feels biblical. You can’t help but attempt to decipher messages hidden in the lyrics, something that could save us from our present-day chaos, or at least make us more comfortable with it. The album has moments of respite, but it magnetizes you back toward careful chaos. See, you can dance through a track like “Hideaway” and move to forget, but then the closing track, “The Future is A Drag” reminds you of the state of things again. Much like the bustling Queens borough, there’s a calm, but not without a commotion.

“When I’m listening to music, it’s more about just being here and now in this time and place and listening to these sounds. Sometimes it’s an old blues record, sometimes it’s a T-Rex record, sometimes it’s Vince Staples — whatever it is. There’s something that just gets captured sometimes that I call ‘the slow within the fast.’ To me, it’s the most amazing thing I can think of experiencing. It’s this marriage between rhythm and, I guess, melody and, not to sound lame, but there’s a shifting thing that happens on really good records like My Bloody Valentine or something like that, where there’s something shifting underneath your feet. The ground is shifting. It could be a fast song — hip-hop does it really well — or it can be a really shoegaze-y thing that’s slower. But, that’s kind of what we’re going for. We want to move people in the way we know is possible to be moved because we’re just lovers of music.”

Debut album ‘So Removed’ – Out now on City Slang

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Orindal Records is proud to present the first vinyl release by Chicago singer/songwriter/guitarist Julie Byrne.

The first time we heard Julie’s debut cassette, You Would Love It Here, It’s The Perfect Place For You (Solid Melts), we immediately fell in love with her gentle, understated folk songs. Accompanying herself on a fingerpicked acoustic guitar, Julie sings about memory, hope, and coping with loss. There is restraint and measure in her singing and playing, and both ache with the same fragile beauty.

The two songs on this brief EP tell a complete story; “Holiday” recalls a New Year’s Eve in New York City, future plans made, and the fall-out of a fleeting romance, while the b-side, “Marmalade,” carries a dimming torch into the future, through changing seasons, bringing peace and closure to uneasy memories.

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Faster or Greener than Now was recorded live to tape on an April afternoon by Owen Ashworth. Vintage echo and spring reverb effects were added to color Julie’s performances, lending a haunted atmosphere to these raw and intimate recordings.

The title of this record was taken from a Frank O’Hara poem.

Originally released December 4th, 2012

Songs, vocals & guitar by Julie Byrne