Posts Tagged ‘New York’

Charly Bliss are back with their sophomore album Young Enough. Produced by Joe Chiccarelli (U2, Beck, Alanis, The Strokes, The Killers, My Morning Jacket, Cage The Elephant), the album finds the band exploring both the darker and poppier side of their sound while expanding on what made their debut Guppy a critically acclaimed smash.

http://

Releases May 10th, 2019

Charly Bliss is Eva Hendricks, Sam Hendricks, Spencer Fox and Dan Shure

Advertisements

Vampire Weekend at Lollapalooza music festival photographed by Koury Angelo in Chicago, IL, USA on 04 August, 2018 for Rolling Stone.

“In some ways [our first three albums were] like kind of one massive period of obsessing, making music, touring, all those things,” Vampire Weekend frontman Ezra Koenig has said. “I think now for the first time in a long time I kinda feel like, a little bit more relaxed. Like, ‘Yeah, we’ll definitely make a fourth album.'” Details are still scant, but the indie rock foursome’s leader revealed that he wants their fourth album to “feel like a new era.” He also said that discarded songs from the Modern Vampires sessions are among the tracks being considered for the as-yet-untitled project.

The NYC outfit recently returned with the joyous new track to launch their upcoming album, ‘Father Of The Bride‘. Ezra Koenig and co. have also announced a lengthy US tour, along with a summer date in Dublin. Now, the group have shared the colourful new visuals for their comeback tune.

The ‘Harmony Hall’ video sees Vampire Weekend cooking up pancakes as a snake lurks around their vibrant kitchen. Later, we see the guys perform in a candlelit room, backed by a dazzling Catherine wheel firework.

Harmony Hall/2021 available everywhere now

Image may contain: 3 people, child

After three years on the road, the New York singer Mal Blum returns with a refreshing directness, a hungry turtle and “Things Still Left To Say.” In their first new song since the 2015 album You Look a Lot Like Me, Blum confronts an estranged relationship where so much has been left unresolved. Though hard, Blum stresses the importance of being truthful, especially while “we’re all still here.”

The upbeat, punk-pop power chords and infectious lyrics are accompanied appropriately by a karaoke-style video. Along with the neon pink and blue text stretching across the screen with every line, a montage of clips shows people dancing and singing into the camera to “Things Still Left To Say.” In the background, Blum is laid out in a plant-filled living room, feeding lettuce to a turtle. Vibrant and liberating in all it’s awkward glory, what shines through is Blum’s signature, self-effacing honesty.

“‘Things Still Left To Say’ is a song about the desire and persistence to be heard,” Blum tells us in an email. “About times when we swallow or deflect vulnerable aspects of ourselves because we feel that there is no space for them. This song is about navigating that distance, the specific flavor of isolation (so awkward that it’s almost comical) that occurs when you feel unknown in front of those who think that they know you the best.”

Blum repeats a kind of mantra in the chorus, “There are thing still left to say / I’ve got phrases / I’ve got phrases.” It’s a reminder to keep those words close, just in case you get a chance to set them free.

“Things Still Left To Say”is out now on Don Giovanni Records, and Blum will be back on tour with Lucy Dacus and Fenne Lily in March.

Palehound (aka Ellen Kempner) has shared a brand new song, “Killer.” It is out now via Polyvinyl Record Co. and shared in honor of her current tour dates.

“With the new track, Palehound is teasing more new music to come,” a press release notes.

It may be the middle of February, but “Killer” is what Halloween-themed playlists have been wishing for. Dreamy, plucked guitar sequences invite the listener into the portrait of a walk home alone, down a sidewalk by the woods where the moonlight cuts through just enough to make you second-guess flickering shadows. Steady drums and a creeping, sinister bass slink in, ensnaring your attention before Kempner’s mesmerizing voice is heard crooning lines like, “Just because I feel the devil in your bed / doesn’t mean it’s you.” Wailing, howl-like riffs carry out the ominous dreamscape to a spine-tingling finish.

The song’s menacing undertones, while hypnotic in their delivery, touch on a more serious topic. “Quite frankly, this song is about the murderous fantasies I have about all of the people who have abused my friends and how they continue to live their lives unpunished,” Kempner said in a statement.

http://

Luluc Dear Hamlyn

Luluc released their debut album, “Dear Hamlyn”, in 2008; the songs were written following the death of Randell’s father. Dear Hamlyn eventually gained a large group of influential admirers. Peter Blackstock co-founder of No Depression Magazine, wrote of the album, “The most beautiful album I’ve heard in ten years.” In 2011, Nick Drake’s producer, Joe Boyd, also taken by Dear Hamlyn, invited Luluc to feature in his Nick Drake tribute tour. They contributed the tracks “Things Behind the Sun” and “Fly” to the live tribute album, Way to Blue: The Songs of Nick Drake in 2013.

http://

Luluc went on to sign with Sub Pop Records and release the critically acclaimed albums Passerby (2014) and Sculptor (2018). This edition of Dear Hamlyn is the first time it has been available on vinyl.

The Wealthiest Queen from the Luluc album Dear Hamlyn. The film clip is a Lucy Dyson animation, inspired by the work of Busby Berkeley. Song written by Zoe Randell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For over a decade, guitarist/vocalist Steve Gunn has been one of American music’s most pivotal figures – conjuring immersive and psychedelic sonic landscapes both live and on record, releasing revered solo albums ranking high on in-the-know end of year lists, alongside exploratory collaborations with artists as diverse as Mike Cooper, Kurt Vile, and Michael Chapman (whose most recent studio album he produced). Gunn is known for telling other people’s stories, but on his breakthrough fourth album, “The Unseen In Between”, he explores his own emotional landscapes with his most complex, fully realized songs to date. The lyrics evoke voyages, tempests (actual and emotional), and a rich cast of characters met along the way — the work of an artist finding a place of calm in the midst of a storm. Produced by frequent collaborator James Elkington and engineered by Daniel Schlett, the immaculately recorded Unseen forces a reassessment of Gunn’s standing in the pantheon of the era’s great songwriters. Getting to The Unseen In Between itself was not easy for Gunn.

In the summer of 2016, Gunn released Eyes On The Lines, his winning and elliptical debut for Matador Records. It should have been a triumphant moment, but exactly two weeks later, Gunn’s father and namesake died following a two-year struggle with cancer. This experience yielded the emotional centerpiece of the album. “Stonehurst Cowboy” is a duet for Gunn’s raw acoustic guitar and spare basslines by Bob Dylan’s musical director Tony Garnier, whose featured throughout the album. The song distills the lessons Gunn learned from his father and it is a solemn but tender remembrance, a tribute to his father’s reputation as a tough, wise, and witty guy from far west Philadelphia. A sense of musical renewal and emotional complexity fits the new songs perfectly; “Luciano” seems to be about the chemistry between a bodega owner and his cat, an unspoken romance of gentle obedience and quiet gestures. But Gunn peers below the relationship’s surface and wonders about the owner’s lonely future once the cat is gone, a devastating meditation wrapped in soft strings.

http://

And then there’s “Vagabond,” Gunn’s graceful attempt to humanize a rich cast of characters whose lives have gone astray, wanderers who live outside of society’s modern safety net, who pursue “a crooked dream” in spite of what the world expects. Supported by the perfect harmonies of Meg Baird, Gunn finds something lovely in the unloved. In a final contrast, “Morning is Mended” is an acoustic beauty so resplendent it ranks alongside Sandy Denny or Jackson C. Frank. Buoyed by a melody that sparkles like sunlight on still water, Gunn acknowledges the hardships around him, the feeling of being a “nothing sky,” and then moves forward into the world, walking tall into the fresh morning. The song is an apt encapsulation of The Unseen In Between, a gorgeously empathetic record that attempts to recognize the worries of the world and offer some timely assurance. It is a revelatory and redemptive set, offering the balm of understanding at a time when that seems in very short supply.

Released January 18th, 2019

Steve Gunn – Guitars, Vocals
James Elkington – Guitars, Keys, Percussion, Harmonica,
Tony Garnier – Bass
TJ Mainani – Drums
Meg Baird – Vocals
Daniel Schlett – Keys, Percussion
Macie Stewart – Strings
Lia Kohl – Strings
Jacob Daneman – Clarinet

All songs written by Steve Gunn

Mercury Rev is an American indie rock group that formed in 1989 in Buffalo, New York. A band committed to experimentation and reinvention, their music has run the gambit from neo-psych and noise rock, lush pastoralism, and 4/4 electronica.

It slipped out of a Mississippi of hot biscuits, genteel table manners and working-class sense, suddenly overturned by a grave sinning and suicide. Carried on an evening breeze of strings and a supple, foreboding voice like sensually charged breath, “Ode to Bilie Joe”—Bobbie Gentry’s 1967 debut as a singer-songwriter and a Number One single for three weeks in the late Summer of Love—was the most psychedelic record of that year not from San Francisco or London, as if Bob Dylan, Neil Young and Brian Wilson had conspired to make a country-rock Pet Sounds. Except Gentry, just 23 when she wrote the song, got there first, in miniature.

Gentry’s hit was a revolutionary act, a quietly thorough feminism in vision, deed and success amid the strict, paternal order of the country-music industry. And it was her license to thrill again. In October, 1967, while “Billie Joe” was still in the Top Five, Gentry began recording The Delta Sweete, a connected set of a dozen songs that extended the narrative dynamics of that single with personal reflection and set her folk-siren charisma in a richer frame of dream-state orchestration, swamp-rock guitars and big-city-R&B horns.

In her eight original songs for the album, Gentry drew from her childhood and church life on her grandparents’ farm in Chickasaw County, Mississippi: the girl-ish craving for a beautiful dress in “Reunion”; the rise-and-shine of “Mornin’ Glory”; the stern Sunday lessons in “Sermon,” based on a traditional hymn also known as “Run On.” The covers were boldly chosen: Mose Allison’s chain-gang blues “Parchman Farm”; “Tobacco Road”’s litany of trial; the Cajun pride in Doug Kershaw’s “Louisiana Man”. Gentry also turned them to new purpose and even gender. “Gonna get myself a man, one gonna treat me right,” she sang in Jimmy Reed’s “Big Boss Man” with heated assurance.

But The Delta Sweete—released in March, 1968, only three months after Dylan’s John Wesley Harding and right as the Byrds came to Nashville to cut Sweetheart of the Rodeo—was too soon in its precedence. Gentry’s LP, the first country-rock opera, was ignored on arrival, not even cracking Billboard’s Top 100. It was as if Billie Joe had risen out of the Tallahatchie River and thrown that record off the bridge instead.

This Delta Sweete is her long-delayed justice—Mercury Rev’s committed and an affectionate resurrection of an album that anticipated by three decades their own pivotal expedition through transcendental America, 1998’s Deserter’s Songs. From their recording lair in New York’s Catskill Mountains, the founding core of Jonathan Donahue and Grasshopper with Jesse Chandler (previously in the Texas group Midlake) honor Gentry’s foresight and creative triumph with spacious invention and hallucinatory air. And they are not alone. Gentry’s stories and original resolve are brought to new vocal life and empowerment by a vocal cast of women from across modern rock and its alternative paths: among them, Mazzy Star’s Hope Sandoval; Laetitia Sadier, formerly of Stereolab; Marissa Nadler; Margo Price, the fiery new country star with a punk-rock heart; and Norway’s Susanne Sundfør, who cuts through “Tobacco Road” with arctic-Nico poise. Phoebe Bridgers, whose first record was a softly stunning 2015 single for Ryan Adams’ PAX AM label, hovers through the acid- western suspense of Gentry’s “Jessye’ Lisabeth” with floating calm, like a comforting angel.

Bobbie Gentry, 1968 (NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)

On the 1968 LP, Gentry opened with a call to jubilant order, “Okolona River Bottom Band,” like she was leading a barn-dance union of the early Rolling Stones and Louis Armstrong’s Hot Five. Norah Jones takes that entrance here with her own sultry command, like Sarah Vaughan at the head of a slow-blooming choir. In “Sermon,” Price—who has known real struggle up close—sings like a survivor through Mercury Rev’s explosion of color and groove: a specialty throughout the band’s history as recently as 2015’s The Light in You, going back through All Is Dream in 2001, the whirling iridescent soul of 1995’s See You on the Other Side and the sumptuous turbulence of the 1992 single “Car Wash Hair.”

Gentry is still very present in the changes. Her seesaw of pride and hurt in the melancholy blur of “Penduli Pendulum” (“When goodbye serves as/My one amusement”) is even more explicit with the seasoned intimacy of Vashti Bunyan—a once-elusive voice from Britain’s psychedelic-folk boom—set against the younger, brighter arc of Kaela Sinclair, now in the electronic project M83. And in “Courtyard,” a despairing finale of strings and guitar arpeggios on Gentry’s LP, Mercury Rev build a striking Delta Krautrock in which the English singer Beth Orton wanders, like Gentry, through a ruin of profound loss and treasured memory.

http://

“Ode to Billie Joe” was not on the ‘68 Delta Sweete. But Mercury Rev go back to that dinner table with Lucinda Williams of Lake Charles, Louisiana, and it is an inspired bond, calling up the ghosts and questions of a South still very much with us. Indeed, Gentry—who retired from recording and performing in the Seventies—reportedly lives only a couple hours’ drive from the bridge that made her famous, while the spirits she set loose in The Delta Sweete are as restless and compelling as they were 50 years ago. This album is a loving tribute to that achievement, one of the greatest albums you have never heard. It is also a dozen new ways to walk that land.

releases February 1st, 2019

Image may contain: 4 people, people standing

“Something often lost: Life is process, not product,” sings Patrick Kindlon on “Unlicensed Guidance Counselor,” perhaps the most poignant track on Cheer. Drug Church’s third album is a tribute to that “process.” Kindlon’s protagonists are studies in humanity, captured with a photographer’s eye, a poet’s ear, and a comic’s timing. The titular “Unlicensed” advisor offers “guidance” via hilarious/horrifying anecdotes as good as anything in Confederacy Of Dunces … mashed up with platitudes lifted from Dark Knight dialogue. It’s perfection: Kindlon is on some zen-master shit and his lessons are delivered over bangers indebted to Pixies, Fugazi, and countless other erstwhile bash-and-poppers largely lost to time. Such is life. Cherish the moments. Trust the process. Buy this product.

http://

Band Members
Patrick-vocals, Chris-drums, Nick-guitar, Patrick-bass, Cory-guitar,

No automatic alt text available.

Parquet Courts have had a busy year, releasing great new album Wide Awake! back in May and touring almost nonstop since. The individual members also keep themselves occupied when not immersed in PC duties, and drummer Max Savage (brother of singer/guitarist Andrew Savage) formed his own group, Maxband, this year. Despite the name, Maxband is more than Max (who sings and plays guitar here). Bassist Patrick Smith (A Beacon School) also brings production/mixing skills, and the group is rounded out by drummer Eric Read (Bob Dylan Deathwatch) and lead guitarist Tim Nelson (Architectural Digest) — all four contribute to the songwriting.

http://

Maxband began playing back in the spring (shows have included opening slots for The Men and Tokyo Police Club), and they released their debut, Perfect Strangers, back in August via Gentle Reminder. (Perfect Strangers was their original name.) As a singer, Max sounds a little like his brother, but no one will mistake this record for Parquet Courts. There are riffy jammers (“Spent,” “Means to an End”), and a real fondness for ethereal dream pop, too. That side comes out on super catchy single “Jerry” — which features Patrick on lead vocals — and driving instrumental “Underground.” There’s a little Pavement-style indie rock creeping into songs like “Baggage Claim” but it too is on its own Maxband tangent. With eight songs clocking in at 24 minutes, Perfect Strangers is a quick, fun listen that leaves you wanting more.

released August 24, 2018

Kevin Devine will transform into Kenny O’Brien and The O’Douls for a St. Patrick’s Day celebration in the Boston-area and NYC . He’ll be playing at Great Scott in Allston, and early and late shows and at Mercury Lounge in NYC, and in his words: “It’s gonna be a party, essentially, the kind of punk, uptempo side of what I do with some Celtic instrumentation.” To get a taste of what it might be like, Kevin’s got a newly-recorded cover of The Pogues“The Body of An American,” It’s a pretty faithful take on the original, but it also has that unmistakable Kevin Devine touch, and it’s good stuff.

Kevin also put together a (pretty funny) video of himself explaining the reasoning behind the name “Kenny O’Brien and The O’Douls” and what these shows will be all about. He also includes a story about a St. Patrick’s Day 14-hour alcoholic blackout at SXSW.

To get a sense of what we’re doing, head over to BrooklynVegan (who’ll be presenting the shows), enjoy our cover of The Pogues’ “The Body of An American” & get some more info on the project & the weekend:

http://

Released December 13th, 2018