Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn’

Moon 2

On Moon 2 Ava Luna’s de facto band leader Carlos Hernandez steps back, leaving space for the rest of the band members to step up and step into roles they hadn’t occupied on previous albums.

Felicia Douglass (now a touring member of Dirty Projectors) worked with percussion and sampler, Julian Fader experimented with synths, nearly every band member ran the computer during recording sessions, and Becca Kauffman (aka performance artist Jennifer Vanilla) composed her first song for the group “On Its Side the Fallen Fire,” a deeply layered orchestral piece of kate bush grandeur meets julia holter reverie. compared with previous Ava Luna albums, Moon 2 has fewer sharp turns into dissonance, fewer celebratory guitar parts, none of Hernandez’s signature screams. nevertheless, the infectious buoyancy of “Deli run” and “Walking with an Enemy,” are warm and bright, and songs like “Centerline” and “Phoebe (set it off)” venture confidently into pop territory. the title track, paint ing the elation and tumult of a crush, is set against a swaggering reggae bassline and warbling kraftwerk synths. “it’s like, every sci-fi movie has a nightclub,” says Kauffman.

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We are happy to share some nice news with you. Adrianne Lenker of Big Thief has made a stunning new solo album and Saddle Creek Reords are proud to be releasing it. A songwriter who has undoubtedly made an impact on many lives, Lenker set out to make an intimate and immediate document of a particular time in her life after 2 years on the road with Big Thief. ‘Abysskiss’ is the result it is out on October 5th.

Adrianne Lenker, is the lead singer of Brooklyn based rock band Big Thief,  To coincide with the news, Lenker has also shared the single from the forthcoming album, it is called ‘Cradle’. “I want to archive these songs in their original forms every few years,” Lenker said in a statement.

“My first solo record I made was Hours Were the Bird. I had just turned 21 and moved to New York City where I was sleeping in a warehouse, working in a restaurant and photographing pigeons. Now five years later, another skin is being shed.”

Adrianne LenkerCradle From the album Abysskiss – Out 10/5/18

Mutual Benefit shares new couplet of tracks, “Shedding Skin” and “Come To Pass”

Multi-instrumentalist Jordan Lee, aka Mutual Benefit, has shared another duo of tracks that follow from the first couplet “New History”, and “Storm Cellar Heart”.

Having announced his forthcoming album at the same time as the first two tracks, today Lee shares the second wave of singles, “Shedding Skin” and “Come To Pass”.

His forthcoming album Thunder Follows The Light will consist of tracks accumulated over the past two years and will hold both returning and new collaborators.

On the first of two, “Come To Pass”, Lee states, “These songs came about at the same time on a busted 5 string guitar when I shut off my phone and declared my bedroom a makeshift, artist residency for a week. I had just returned from a tour that did a lot of meandering around the Appalachian Mountain region right as the “Make America Great Again” signs started popping up more and more. “Come to Pass” is a refutation of the idea that there was ever a golden age to return back to. Both personally and politically I’m afraid of this sort of constructed nostalgia that keeps us looking backwards instead of a having a powerful enough imagination to see the hard truths of the present but work towards a better future.”

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On the second track “Shedding Skin”, Lee explains, “I kept thinking about a town where I saw hundreds of these translucent cicada bodies from where they had clung to a tree, hardened, and then burst out of their own shell. This ghostly sight made me pay more attention to how things naturally regenerate, how loss is part of the fuel of growth. It became a powerful reminder that things shouldn’t stay the same, including parts of ourselves.”
Thunder Follows The Light is due out 21st September via Transgressive on all platforms, including a special edition vinyl. Mutual Benefit has announced a UK and US tour that sees him play London’s Oslo on 30 October.

Bambara is a grimy noise-rock band whose recent release “Shadow on Everything” is a cinematic achievement. The loose concept record mashes cowboy jangle with aggressive post-punk to form a scummy, empty landscape for characters to inhabit. Laced throughout is a winding, poetic tale of relationship strife and vignettes from the character’s hometown.

These guys are killing it and are unmatched in their intensity when it comes to live performances.

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Band Members:
Reid Bateh – Vocals
Blaze Bateh – Drums
William Brookshire – Bass
Bryan Keller Jr. – Guitar
Sammy Zalta – Guitar
Released July 19th, 2018

Cut Worms is the nom de plume of songwriter Max Clarke, whose debut LP will seduce you right off the bat with its sparkling opening track, “How It Can Be.” With his intimate indie voice and facility for instantly memorable melodies and guitar lines, Clarke conjures a kind of garage-tested Everly Brothers, reminiscent of early Shins, with breezy pop ballads just tart enough to soundtrack lonesome summer days. Hollow Ground was recorded in the L.A. home studio of Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado, and in New York with Jason Finkel at Gary’s Electric. Check out the animated video for “Don’t Want To Say Good-bye,” and prepare to hum it for the rest of the day.

“Don’t Want To Say Good-bye” from debut LP “Hollow Ground” out May 4th on Jagjaguwar

Tons of Everly Brothers and Buddy Holly in Hollow Ground, which flies in the face of present day music. What’s wrong with this one man band Max Clarke and his compulsion of a bygone era? Who cares, when it sounds this good.

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“Cash For Gold” from debut LP “Hollow Ground” out May 4th on Jagjaguwar Records

This NYC art-punk/new wave group is one of the most interesting new bands I’ve heard in 2018. At times I’m reminded of The B-52’s, Pylon, X, Cake and Lithics. They are an exciting live band too:

That image-heavy universe which Bodega operate in is essential to their make-up. They talk of their on-stage light boxes as “the sixth member of Bodega, while their sound – equal parts Matrix-esque futurism (they all walk on stage later this evening clad head-to-toe in black and copious amounts of leather and PVC), and dusty, New York-indebted post-punk – occupies the kind of stylistic realm that art students dribble over.

“I think we were all really excited about a kind of rock minimalism,” says Ben, “which can mean a lot of different things. For example, not having cymbals in the drum set, or doing anything frilly in the guitar parts; not repeating parts or lyrics, just in and out.”

It’s easily picked up on ‘Endless Scroll’, and its brittle, brilliant lead single ‘How Did This Happen?’, a track that’s all sharp angles and cutting pontifications on consumerism – “This machine? You know it don’t kill fascists? / This machine, it’s just a guitar,” Ben quips at one point. He calls that stark approach to music-making their “sonic mission statement”, while also referring separately to an ethical one.

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The first moment of Endless Scroll’s winkingly-titled second track, “Bodega Birth,” states the album’s thesis: “I use my computer for everything / Heaven knows I’m miserable now.” In both its content and its monotone delivery, the line addresses the ways our technological access leads to a kind of internal deadening. “Bookmarks” is even more direct: “All day at work / Stare at computer/ Come home from work / Stare at computer,” drilling down on the banality of constant access. It’s not all screens, though: On opener “How Did This Happen?!,” Bodega A lament how technology has led to political complacency and “slacktivism”; “Can’t Knock The Hustle,” with its quips about nine-dollar smoothies and hourly salaries—and a sardonic chorus that goes, “You can’t knock the hustle / When the cats are making capital”—is an anti-capitalist anthem that socialist organizations could adopt as their fight song.

Such straightforward lyricism demands music that’s equally unflashy, and Bodega’s simple, wiry arrangements rise to the occasion. The songs are built from little more than slightly overdriven guitars, simple, driving drums, and Belfiglio and Hozie’s yelped vocals. Just as Bodega’s lyrics plainly and boldly analyze our current state, so too are the songs striking in their direct, yet incisive, arrangements.

Band Members
Ben Hozie
Nikki Belfiglio
Montana Simone
Heather Elle
Madison Velding-VanDam

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There’s something special about the band Wild Pink and their new album. The Brooklyn indie rock trio’s 2017 debut paired insightful, wide-eyed lyrics with heavy chords and twinkly emo tunings, spilling out about frustrations familiar to any twenty-something urbanite struggling to find a place in this mixed-up world. Buried beneath lines about smartphones and the Redskins/Cowboys NFL rivalry, the album offered a glimmer of sprawling Americana, and considering what we heard with “Lake Erie,” the band appears to continue that pursuit on the upcoming Tiny Engines album.

The track “Jewels Drossed In The Runoff” evokes the rushing swell of the crusty industrial oceanside. With anthemic guitars and chilling, crystalline synth pads, the track channels some of the biggest moments of mid-’80s heartland rock, with chords and lyrics that feel like a dead match for Tom Petty. Frontman John Ross sings about a committed lover with an earnest falsetto that can’t seem to get past doubting himself. “I grew up removed / And you have a heart like a star, you give away your best,” he sings in the track’s final moments. It’s a planetarium of spirit delivered in the most honest form imaginable.

Band Members
John Ross,
TC Brownell,
Dan Keegan,

Wild Pink “Yolk In The Fur” out 7/20/2018 on Tiny Engines Records

The Essex Green are a neo-psychedelic pop outfit from Brooklyn, NY, via Burlington, VT. The band is primarily composed ofsongwriters Jeff Baron, Sasha Bell, and Chris Ziter and specializes in a classic sound inspired by 1960s–1970s pop and folk in the tradition of bands like The Left Banke and Fairport Convention.

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Originally released February 21st, 2006

Vintage rock quintet Wilder Maker announces new album Zion, shares video for "Drunk Driver"

Self-proclaimed “cosmic American” band Wilder Maker are set to release their new record, Zion, July 13th via Northern Spy Records. The latest single “Impossible Summer” is swirling and soothing, like the cool breeze that cuts the oppressive feeling of an August afternoon in New York City. Frontman Gabriel Birnbaum wrote the song about a time when he was losing touch with reality. Though written by Birnbaum, “Impossible Summer” is sung by longtime collaborator Katie Von Schleicher, who breathes a poignant softness into the track. “I cannot explain that summer,” she sings. Their “Impossible Summer” will leave you scrambling to find any words at all. How often do you encounter a tune so inventive it sounds like Radiohead took a road trip with Joni Mitchell?

Wilder Maker once again defy genre stereotypes on their newest single. The Brooklyn-based indie outfit skirt the confines of the typical “folk” sound, so it’s not fair to apply that label without tacking on some hyphenated sub-genre qualifiers. Their previous track was well praised, the engrossing “Drunk Driver” also from their upcoming Zion album.

Then in March we reveled in the more psychedelic “Closer to God” that evoked both Tom Petty and Kurt Vile. Whether you call their sound “neo-folk” or “experimental folk-pop,”

Of the many thousands of bands within the indie folk scene, few (if any) display the creative brilliance of Wilder Maker. These musical chameleons offer plenty for all music fans to love.

Wilder Maker is comprised of: Gabriel Birnbaum (lyrics/instrumentation/vocals), Katie Von Schleicher (keys/vocals), Adam Brisbin (guitar/vocals), Nick Jost (bass/vocals), and Sean Mullins (drums/vocals)

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Brooklyn-based synth-pop trio Half Waif released their Cascine Records debut album Lavender in April. It’s about love, legacy and the inevitable decline of human existence. The album’s closer “Ocean Scope” ties up loose ends after 11 songs filled with talk of endings.

The band has released a lavender-tinted music video for the song with a dawn-to-dusk transformation of lead singer Nandi Rose Plunkett. “The video starts and ends on a salt marsh, where the land meets the ocean,” Plunkett said of the video in a statement. “What happens in the night in between is a spiritual reverie, a walk through the ego and revisiting of past selves.”

To match this transformation, we see Plunkett wade into the water before transitioning to a run through the forest with war paint-like makeup. The purples hues intensify as the video soldiers on until Plunkett has a startling awakening back on the marsh in the pastel hue of the early morning.