Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn’

Brooklyn five-piece Barrie are releasing their debut album, “Happy to Be Here”, on May 3rd via Winspear. Now they have shared another song from the album, “Saturated.” Previously they shared its lead single, “Clovers” Then they shared another song from the album, “Darjeeling,” via a video for the song.

Barrie’s leader Barrie Lindsay had this to say about the song in a press release: “This song is pretty pure…. It came out fully formed, sounding mostly like how it sounds now. It’s minimal and exposed, kind of vulnerable but in a confident way. I want people to relate to that state of pure, open saturation. I want this song to feel like a crush.”

Lindsay wrote the album’s songs late at night alone in her apartment, plays various instruments on the album (guitar, piano, synth, and bass), and co-produced the album with Jake Aron (Snail Mail, Solange, Grizzly Bear). But Barrie is not simply a solo project, the band also features Dominic Apa, Spurge Carter, Noah Prebish, and Sabine Holler, who had to record her backing vocals remotely from Germany due to visa issues. The band members are from all over, having previously lived in Boston, Baltimore, Upstate New York, London, and São Paulo via Berlin, but came together in New York.  The band’s pleasing dream pop/indie pop that would appeal to fans of Yumi Zouma.

“The scaffolding of this album is moving to New York and finding these people that make up the band,” Barrie says in a press release. “We’re very different, but we cover each other’s gaps personally and creatively, and are eager to learn from each other.”

Barrie’s debut album ‘Happy To Be Here’ – out May 03, 2019 on Winspear:

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We are super excited to announce a brand new band to the world and the City Slang roster! They’re called WIVES, they’re from Queens, NYC and they’re undoubtedly going to be your new favourite band. ⁣ ⁣ First single ‘Waving Past Nirvana’ is available on 7″ vinyl will drop on May 24th.

The quartet are the latest fit in a long lineage of New York’s gritty, melodic-tinged punk-hook-driven, grungy dark-wave that’s tethered to daily anxiety without resorting to cynicism. Both the noisy dissonance of Sonic Youth and the clever, cerebral sneering of The Fall simmer as touchstones within the band’s music.⁣ ⁣

New single ‘Waving Past Nirvana’ is OUT NOW

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U.F.O.F. is the highly anticipated third record by Big Thief, set to be released on 3rd May 2019 via 4AD Records.

U.F.O.F. was recorded in rural western Washington at Bear Creek Studios.  In a large cabin-like room, the band set up their gear to track live with engineer Dom Monks and producer Andrew Sarlo, who was also behind their previous albums.  Having already lived these songs on tour, they were relaxed and ready to experiment.  The raw material came quickly.  Some songs were written only hours before recording and stretched out instantly, first take, vocals and all.

“Making friends with the unknown… All my songs are about this,” says Lenker; “If the nature of life is change and impermanence, I’d rather be uncomfortably awake in that truth than lost in denial.”

Band Members
Adrianne Lenker, Buck Meek, James Krivchenia, Max Oleartchik

‘UFOF’ by Big Thief, from the new album ‘U.F.O.F.’, released May 3rd on 4AD Records.

Charly Bliss Announce New Album <i>Young Enough</i>, Share Video for New Single "Capacity"

Charly Bliss have announced the release of their second full-length album “Young Enough”, due out May 10th on Barsuk Records. They’ve also shared a video for the album’s lead single “Capacity,” directed by Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast. Charly Bliss, a band who previously leaned punk-rock, made an invigorated return with a new song that sounds more like pop heaven than lo-fi garage purgatory.

“Capacity” has all of the band’s signature power-pop sound, but this time it appears to be pointed more towards major-key synths than the punk fervor of their debut record Guppy. The video for “Capacity” depicts the band members as robbers who have a falling out after completing a heist. Adam Kolodny served as director of photography for the video and Zauner edited it.

“Charly Bliss has always made great narrative music videos, so I wanted to stay in line with that tradition and take advantage of working with a band that are all such great, funny actors individually,” Zauner said of the video in a statement. “Eva had an amazing mood board she brought to the table with references to Paris, Texas, Five Easy Pieces and Badlands so it was important for us to showcase a warm, ‘70s color palette.”

“It was a dream come true to work with Adam and Michelle on this video,” said Charly Bliss vocalist Eva Hendricks. ”’Capacity’ is a song about wanting to kill your inner people-pleaser, and Michelle beautifully presented a parallel concept, which warns of the perils of getting swept up in other people’s bullshit.”

The announcement for Young Enough comes just two days after Charly Bliss replaced all their posts on Instagram with a video of a dramatically lit room with a drum loop playing overhead, prompting whispers of a forthcoming album. The post now appears to reference the “Capacity” video.

Young Enough will be the Brooklyn band’s first album since 2017’s critically acclaimed Guppy. They also released a new single in September 2018 titled “Heaven.” It appears that track won’t appear on the new album, though.

Luluc Dear Hamlyn

Luluc released their debut album, “Dear Hamlyn”, in 2008; the songs were written following the death of Randell’s father. Dear Hamlyn eventually gained a large group of influential admirers. Peter Blackstock co-founder of No Depression Magazine, wrote of the album, “The most beautiful album I’ve heard in ten years.” In 2011, Nick Drake’s producer, Joe Boyd, also taken by Dear Hamlyn, invited Luluc to feature in his Nick Drake tribute tour. They contributed the tracks “Things Behind the Sun” and “Fly” to the live tribute album, Way to Blue: The Songs of Nick Drake in 2013.

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Luluc went on to sign with Sub Pop Records and release the critically acclaimed albums Passerby (2014) and Sculptor (2018). This edition of Dear Hamlyn is the first time it has been available on vinyl.

The Wealthiest Queen from the Luluc album Dear Hamlyn. The film clip is a Lucy Dyson animation, inspired by the work of Busby Berkeley. Song written by Zoe Randell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For over a decade, guitarist/vocalist Steve Gunn has been one of American music’s most pivotal figures – conjuring immersive and psychedelic sonic landscapes both live and on record, releasing revered solo albums ranking high on in-the-know end of year lists, alongside exploratory collaborations with artists as diverse as Mike Cooper, Kurt Vile, and Michael Chapman (whose most recent studio album he produced). Gunn is known for telling other people’s stories, but on his breakthrough fourth album, “The Unseen In Between”, he explores his own emotional landscapes with his most complex, fully realized songs to date. The lyrics evoke voyages, tempests (actual and emotional), and a rich cast of characters met along the way — the work of an artist finding a place of calm in the midst of a storm. Produced by frequent collaborator James Elkington and engineered by Daniel Schlett, the immaculately recorded Unseen forces a reassessment of Gunn’s standing in the pantheon of the era’s great songwriters. Getting to The Unseen In Between itself was not easy for Gunn.

In the summer of 2016, Gunn released Eyes On The Lines, his winning and elliptical debut for Matador Records. It should have been a triumphant moment, but exactly two weeks later, Gunn’s father and namesake died following a two-year struggle with cancer. This experience yielded the emotional centerpiece of the album. “Stonehurst Cowboy” is a duet for Gunn’s raw acoustic guitar and spare basslines by Bob Dylan’s musical director Tony Garnier, whose featured throughout the album. The song distills the lessons Gunn learned from his father and it is a solemn but tender remembrance, a tribute to his father’s reputation as a tough, wise, and witty guy from far west Philadelphia. A sense of musical renewal and emotional complexity fits the new songs perfectly; “Luciano” seems to be about the chemistry between a bodega owner and his cat, an unspoken romance of gentle obedience and quiet gestures. But Gunn peers below the relationship’s surface and wonders about the owner’s lonely future once the cat is gone, a devastating meditation wrapped in soft strings.

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And then there’s “Vagabond,” Gunn’s graceful attempt to humanize a rich cast of characters whose lives have gone astray, wanderers who live outside of society’s modern safety net, who pursue “a crooked dream” in spite of what the world expects. Supported by the perfect harmonies of Meg Baird, Gunn finds something lovely in the unloved. In a final contrast, “Morning is Mended” is an acoustic beauty so resplendent it ranks alongside Sandy Denny or Jackson C. Frank. Buoyed by a melody that sparkles like sunlight on still water, Gunn acknowledges the hardships around him, the feeling of being a “nothing sky,” and then moves forward into the world, walking tall into the fresh morning. The song is an apt encapsulation of The Unseen In Between, a gorgeously empathetic record that attempts to recognize the worries of the world and offer some timely assurance. It is a revelatory and redemptive set, offering the balm of understanding at a time when that seems in very short supply.

Released January 18th, 2019

Steve Gunn – Guitars, Vocals
James Elkington – Guitars, Keys, Percussion, Harmonica,
Tony Garnier – Bass
TJ Mainani – Drums
Meg Baird – Vocals
Daniel Schlett – Keys, Percussion
Macie Stewart – Strings
Lia Kohl – Strings
Jacob Daneman – Clarinet

All songs written by Steve Gunn

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I’ll be honest, I loved Joan As Police Woman‘s first album (Real Life from 2006), liked the second one (2008’s To Survive) and then slightly lost track. 2011’s The Deep Field and 2014’s The Classic had their moments but ultimate didn’t really do it for me, while Benjamin Lazar Davis collaboration Let It Be Me was bought, filed but shamefully I ‘forgot’ to listen to it…

Cue the power of a good old fashioned ‘catchy’ song. While a pop chart hit is fairly much out of the question these days, for an artist like Joan As Police Woman, the quality of first single ‘Tell Me’ was more than apparent. Like much of the album, the song concerns communication. It’s a plea for articulation, expression and directness. Literally, ‘tell me what you want and I can try and give it to you.’  There’s something fantastic about the honesty of the sentiment, and the economy and relatively simplicity of the arrangement.

JAPW’s Joan Wasser has an incredible singing voice, but prefers understatement rather than over the top vocal gymnastics. ‘Tell Me’ is slinky delight and memorable enough that my kids were singing along to it when I ‘forced’ my playlists on them on holiday in the summer!

But one song does not a good album make and I think there’s two key things at play here that make the Damned Devotion such a success. Joan’s adventurousness, in terms of experimenting and ‘beat-making’ at her Brooklyn home has really paid off and at the same time she has just hit a rich vein of form and written and produced an incredibly intimate long-player full of moving and memorable songs. It’s a very pure album – it feels like musical and lyrical ideas have flowed straight from Wasser (with the help of trusted collaborators like Kindred Parker) right onto the grooves of the vinyl, unencumbered by a band working out arrangements in a traditional studio environment, where something excellent can inadvertently be shorn of its magic.

Opener ‘Wonderful’ is a delicate rose with electric piano, beats and lots of atmosphere. That song semi-segues into ‘Warning Bell’, where Joan muses about missing the tell-tale signs in a relationship and how she ‘never sees it coming’ into a pillow-soft arrangement.

There’s some exciting rhythms in a more funky middle section with ‘Steed (for Jean Genet)’ and in particular ‘The Silence’ which continues the album’s lyrical themes (“we have so much to say, why don’t we say it?”). One highlight here is the chanting middle eight, which ends with a blistering and satisfying distorted guitar solo.

‘Valid Jagger’ has beautiful melody that sucks you in and a lovely organ denouement, while ‘What Was It Like’ is a moving tribute to Joan’s Dad. ‘Talk About It Later’ is another funky number with an amusing lyric (“later as in 2020…”) and ‘Silly Me’ and ‘I Don’t Mind’ are the ‘come down’ tracks and complete the album.

This is one of those life-changing records. It is that good. Sit back and listen to all 12 tracks from start to finish and you’ll discover that Damned Devotion messes with your body. It gets under your skin, squeezes your heart and perhaps occasionally stirs the loins. It’s Joan As Police Woman’s best album

Catching Brooklyn-based punk band Public Practice live for the first time was an earth-shattering experience. Lead singer Sam York channeled Karen O throughout the performance, holding the crowd in the palm of her sweaty, beer-soaked hands as the rest of the band—a Bushwick DIY supergroup of sorts made up of members of the newly defunct Wall and Beverly—seamlessly transitioned between synthy post-punk and 70’s-esque, groove-inspired art-punk. All of that frenetic energy is clearly still on display on Distance is a Mirror,EP  the group’s first ever release, hinting that much more is on the way in 2019. With a funky breakdown here and blistering distorted guitars there, the EP has a distinct musical sound that’s entirely theirs, eclipsing their past work in other bands in just four tracks spanning twelve minutes. “Bad Girl(s)” sees York fight back at the industry and society that demands she look, act, and sound a specific way, screaming that “I won’t play your game.” That line dominates the ethos of Public Practice, a band that refuses to play by the rules, which in turn led to one of the best debut EPs of 2018, more than whetting our appetite for a full-length in 2019

Members of the bands Beverly & Wall doing punk-disco/danceable new wave that reminds me of Tom Tom Club, Talking Heads, Gossip, Radio 4, The Rapture and maybe LITHICS. The four members of Public Practice—singer Sam York, guitarist Vince McClelland, synth/bassist and vocalist Drew Citron, and drummer/programmer and producer Scott Rosenthal

The full EP, “Distance is a Mirror” by Public Practice,

01. Fate/Glory – 00:00 02. Bad Girl(s) – 02:38 03. Foundation – 04:45 04. Into the Ring – 08:26

Brooklyn supergroup FITS features members of popular local bands Big Ups, Fern Mayo, and gobbinjr. They’ve carved their own niche in the scene, though, creating an identity out of perfect pop instincts and sheer punk aggression. Their 2017 debut, All Belief Is Paradise, offered a wide variety of complex, oftentimes conflicting emotions: anger, fear, desire, joy, and everything in between. Its 12 tracks are served in quick, easy-to-digest bites — not a single one exceeds three minutes, but each is enormous in power.

“Full of sharp turns, heavy lyrics, and bursts of righteous anger. A fierce will to survive animates these lean, scrappy songs.” – Pitchfork
“A hunk of sweet power pop that’s instantly delightful, but melts quickly.” – Bandcamp
“Everything about All Belief is Paradise is gripping.” – Post-Trash

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All Belief is Paradise, named after a line in a Lisa Robertson’s The Weather, honors the spirit of the early material while unveiling Fits’ evolution into a fully formed band. These songs are quick, loud, and rarely content with sticking to any one style, often holding for meditative intervals before launching into full-throttle caffeinated pop. The therapeutic drive behind the songs and the genuine fun of the group’s dynamic make Paradise a rewarding listen and Fits a band that can more than hold its own. Throughout the album Fits shows they’re capable of being thoughtful and bratty, accessible and weird, and tackling it all with confidence, humor, and great hooks.

Band Members
Nicholas Cummins,
Brian Orante,
Emma Witmer,
Joe Galarraga,
Originally released November 17th, 2017

It’s easy to overlook the latest album Nudes by Brooklyn indie-poppers Lucius. On the surface, it’s a stopgap release, a quickly recorded acoustic album of previously released songs and a few covers – the band’s Jess Wolfe and Holly Laessig have been touring as Roger Waters’ backup singers and have no time to make a more involved record. But Nudes shows a stunning new side for the group. Songs like “Tempest” and “Something About You,” which were buried under heavy rock back beats and layers of synthesizer on their original LP versions, are reborn as rousing vocal showcases. Their cover of Tame Impala’s “Eventually” allows Wolfe and Laessig’s voices to cascade and blend into beautiful harmonies; and on “Million Dollar Secret,” previously a one-off single for HBO’s Girls, they let their voices build until they explode for a fiery finale.

Lucius performs “Feels Like a Curse” at The State Theatre in Portland, ME on March 16th, 2018.