Posts Tagged ‘Nap Eyes’

We’ve already shared the excellent “Mark Zuckerberg” single from Nap Eyes, and now we have the latest track from their upcoming album “Snapshot of a Beginner”, which is out on the 27th March via Jagjaguwar Records.

“So Tired” is a change of pace from the irrepressible catchiness of the last single, a more mournful, resigned slice of slacker rock that just begs for a hot water bottle and a blanket.

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Nap Eyes are releasing a new album, Snapshot of a Beginner, on Jagjaguwar/Royal Mountain in partnership with Paradise of Bachelors. On Tuesday they shared another song from the album, “So Tired,” via a lyric video. It features a sublime guitar solo towards the end.

In a press release frontman Nigel Chapman had this to say about “So Tired”: “The ‘So Tired’ refrain marks a slight shift in perspective and its meaning is twofold. For one, I get frustrated sometimes by what the world seems to require for success at a given task (for example, polished songwriting, coherent and understandable communication), so part of this is just me venting on this subject. Sometimes I would rather flow with free writing than try to box songs into rehearsed, many-times-repeated containers.

“Second, at times I find myself wishing people would not hold so many preconceptions about the things in this world a given person might try to communicate. Most of us, myself included, usually assume we already know a lot – even about things we’ve spent very little time thinking about – and because of this attitude, people are often predisposed to misunderstand new ideas, even when they’re communicated in straightforward and coherent ways. But there’s no doubt, an idea won’t ever get through until there’s someone around to listen to it.”

Previously Nap Eyes shared Snapshot of a Beginner’s first single, “Mark Zuckerberg,” via a video for the song (which of course tackles the founder of Facebook).

Nap Eyes features frontman Nigel Chapman, drummer Seamus Dalton, bassist Josh Salter, and guitarist Brad Loughead. Jonathan Low (Big Red Machine, The National) and James Elkington (Steve Gunn, Joan Shelley) produced Snapshot of a Beginner, which was recorded at The National’s Upstate New York Long Pond Studio.

Releases March 27th, 2020

Nap Eyes will release their new album, “Snapshot of a Beginner”, their most concentrated and hi-fi effort to date, on March 27th via Jagjaguwar / Royal Mountain, in partnership with Paradise of Bachelors. Throughout the album, there’s an immediately noticeable leap in arrangement and muscle, one that still holds the raw, nervous energy and the earnest, self-deprecating poetry that make Nap Eyes an enduring cult favorite. The music still brings to mind the bucolic ennui of the Silver Jews and Daniel Johnston’s jittery naïveté, but the new sheen and maturity also now brings to mind the wide-angle appeal of The Jayhawks and the addictive brightness of Green Day’s Kerplunk!.

Lead single “Mark Zuckerberg” is a hi-fi jangle-pop earworm that, at its outset, sounds like it could be the theme song from Party of Five. Less a takedown of any one specific, capitalist tech fascist than it is a poem about the confounding and beautiful swirl of modern life, it is their thoughtful, incisive Hit for The People. “Transcendence is all around us,” Chapman repeats, a freeing incantation and a gift to us all as the coda slows and expands.

On the video, the band notes: “People are scared of Mark Zuckerberg. You look at him before Congress and think, ‘Is this the bogeyman? Is he a CIA plant? Can he read my mind with some sort of God-mode search feature in all my chat transcripts?’ This video leads us to believe that Mark wants to enjoy and surveil whatever world he inhabits, whether it’s starting a band with ghastly apparitions in the spirit realm or changing size according to his whim while observing natural and urban landscapes with equal awe. He wants you to accept his friend request and let him watch over you. ‘When there was only one set of footprints in the sand…’”

Almost all the songs of Nap Eyes are whittled into their final form from frontman Nigel Chapman’s unspooling, 20-minute voice-and-guitar free-writing sessions. Each member — drummer Seamus Dalton, bassist Josh Salter and guitarist Brad Loughead — then plays a crucial role in song development, composing around the idiosyncratic structures and directing the overall sound and feel of the songs.

‘Mark Zuckerberg’ from ’Snapshot of a Beginner’ by Nap Eyes, available March 27th, 2020 on Jagjaguwar

These acclaimed Canadians return with an ambitious, allusive third album that achieves a new sonic clarity, depth, and range to match the effortless melodies and extraordinary writing. It’s the band’s most transparent and personal set of songs to date, in which singer Nigel Chapman interrogates social, psychological, and spiritual milieus for clues about the elusive nature of knowledge.

In one inconceivably complex cosmos, whenever a creature was faced with several possible courses of action, it took them all, thereby creating many distinct temporal dimensions and distinct histories of the cosmos. Since in every evolutionary sequence of the cosmos there were very many creatures, and each was constantly faced with many possible courses, and the combination of all their courses were innumerable, an infinity of distinct universes exfoliated from every moment of every temporal sequence in this cosmos.

― Olaf Stapledon, Star Maker (1937)

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“Brimming with passion & protest. Immediately familiar, yet bracingly distinct… one the most intriguingly idiosyncratic lyricists this side of Dan Bejar.” – Pitchfork

“One of the best rock bands in business today.” – The FADER
“One of the most fascinating songwriters we have today.” – Newsweek
“Purveyors of beatific, sun-drenched roadtrip tunes. Nigel Chapman is owner of one of the most beautiful voices I’ve heard in years.” – NME
“Unvarnished diarizing in lean, art-pop songs.” – Uncut
“Concise, understated alt-rock with cryptic, literate lyrics for Go-Betweens/Bill Callahan fans.” – MOJO

Released March 9th, 2018

NAP EYES – ” Too Bad “

Posted: December 6, 2018 in MUSIC
Tags: , ,

In their first recordings released since the critically acclaimed long-player I’m Bad Now, Haligonian heroes Nap Eyes sail an autumnal wind of regret and longing. “Have You Seen the Light” exposes an inscape of illumination and revelation all too rare today. Hate begets hate, and light begets light. Too Bad?

Have you seen the light?
It’s dawning on you
Do you know what it’s like
To hate things because you’re scared they’ll hate you?

“I’ve Always Known You Care” evinces the affections we do not reveal, as the fall leaves fall, with echoes of Hackamore Brick in the spindly guitar lines. Nigel ends the song with a promise for the future: “Oh yeah, you can count on me.”

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I have always known you care
Maybe it doesn’t seem like it
The leaves are turning in the air
And you know I hate to lose,
I can’t stand to win
Danika Vandersteen once again made the arresting cover art.

Nap Eyes joins Cloud Nothings on a brief Western tour, beginning November 2nd, 2018.

Released November 2nd, 2018

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I didn’t get the greatness of Nap Eyes instantly. It definitely took me some time, but now I can’t understand why I was so blind. Listening to the whole album Whine Of The Mystic opened my ears and now I consider myself as a big fan of the band who is looking forward to listening to the new album again and again . Nap Eyes sort of reminds me of some of my big favourites like The Modern Lovers, The Go-Betweens , but still they seem very original and unique.

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Nap Eyes are a remarkably consistent band. Their 2015 debut, Whine of the Mystic, contains nine tracks of breezy, itinerant indie rock that only occasionally rambles on too long. The follow-up, 2016’s Thought Rock Fish Scale, does more or less the same thing. So the question for these Canadian crypto-jammers is: mix it up on LP3 or nah? I’m Bad Now is another reliable work of songs from Nap Eyes, with stronger melodies and more consistency across the board.

Nap Eyes are a remarkably consistent band. Their 2015 debut, Whine of the Mystic, contains nine tracks of breezy, itinerant indie rock that only occasionally rambles on too long. The follow-up, 2016’s Thought Rock Fish Scale, does more or less the same thing. So the question for these Canadian crypto-jammers is: mix it up on LP3 or nah? I’m Bad Now is another reliable slab from Nap Eyes, with stronger melodies and more consistency across the board.

Band Members
Nigel Chapman, Seamus Dalton, Josh Salter, Brad “Bronson” Loughead,

Nap Eyes ‘I’m Bad Now’, out March 9th, 2018 on Paradise of Bachelors / You’ve Changed / Jagjaguwar’

Nap Eyes Made The Year’s First Classic Indie Rock Album

Nap Eyes moves from psych-riffs to astrophysicists; from Rubaiyatic poetry to punctuated bass, in easy fluid motions. Chapman’s calm, steady voice can be as pained as Bob Dylan’s, and his lyrics can be just as profound
Recorded live to tape, with no overdubs, on the North Shore of Nova Scotia, Nap Eyes‘ quietly contemplative sophomore record refines and elaborates their debut, offering an airier, more spacious second chapter, a bracing blast of bright oceanic sunshine after the moonlit alleys of ‘Whine of the Mystic’. But the briny, cold Atlantic roils beneath these exquisite, literate guitar pop songs, posing riddles about friendship, faith, mortality, and self-doubt. Like all of their recordings to date, the album is framed by a set of severe self-imposed strictures: a mere four days to capture as many songs as possible completely live, with no overdubs, to a temperamental old TEAC four-track 1/4″ tape recorder. The result is a document pristine in its intentional imperfections.
After the dark, drunken night of ‘Whine of the Mystic’ (recorded nocturnally in Montreal), ‘Thought Rock Fish Scale’ brings blinding sunlight and blue horizon to these elemental stories of water, fire, and spirit. Compared with its predecessor, this album is far less concerned with the effects of alcohol–excepting “Click Clack,” with its admission that “Sometimes, drinking, I feel so happy but then / I can’t remember why … Sometimes, drinking, I don’t know my best friend for my best friend”–and more concerned with negotiating the mornings after, all the hungover or otherwise creaky, tentative new mornings of a life assembled from discrete days. Nap Eyes are one of the best rock bands in business today, handily spanning the space between Bob Dylan and The Microphones. Nigel Chapman’s songwriting grips like the best of them. A timeless release, already.
Musically, a new delicacy and tautness manifest here as well, a patient willingness to wait; Josh Salter (bass), Seamus Dalton (drums), and Brad Loughead (lead guitar) exhibit consummate restraint. Sonic touchstones remain similar–The Go-Betweens (particularly Robert Forster’s melancholic bite). ‘Thought Rock Fish Scale’ deploys the language of anxiety and self-reflection as a sort of symbolic vernacular. Nap Eyes make soul music, in the sense that their music describes, from a position of uneasy humility, the often mundane maintenance of the fragile human soul….
For fans of The Only Ones/England’s Glory, The Modern Lovers, The Clean, The Verlaines, The Go-Betweens, Bedhead, and all things Lou Reed.
LP With lyrics, color inner sleeve, and download code.

The members of Nap Eyes pick their favourite songs from Thought Rock Fish Scale.

Josh Salter (bass)

I think “Mixer” is the strongest one. The spacing in the music, the narrative, the musicality and interplay between instruments. It is a little jazzier than the rest.

Seamus Dalton (drums)

“Lion In Chains” is crazy. You can really hear the room in these recordings which teleports me back to our little Pictou vacation. A lot of other recordings I’ve done aren’t tied so directly to a time and space for me due to the process being scattered and jazzed out, but this record is a very vivid reminder of a super cool time for me.

Brad Loughead (guitar)

Right now, it’s “Lion in Chains.” I love the laid-back rocking chair feeling, and “Trust” is just an excellent pop song.

Nigel Chapman (guitar/vocals)

I love a lot of the songs. I think I love all of them, but then sometimes I don’t love any of them. But I do love them. They all seem to fit together. They all mean a lot to me.

Nap Eyes: The Best of What's Next

Nap Eyes “Whine Of The Mystic” An absolute joy of a record from the garage pop of ‘The Night of the First Show’ and ‘No Man Needs to Care’ via the countrified ‘Make Something’ to the circular grind of the brilliant ‘Delirium and Persecution Paranoia’. ‘Whine of the Mystic’ may in some ways appear dishevelled and scruffy, but at its heart is uplifting pop music. A cracker.

Nigel Chapman speaks much like he sings. As leader of the jangly indie band Nap Eyes, the singer-guitarist spills out his lyrics in wordy and occasional discursive heaps, exploring sociological and philosophical ideas through some sharp self-reflection.

Whine Of The Mystic cover art