Posts Tagged ‘Australia’

Come on a journey of kaleidoscopic and sinister whimsy with the new album from Australia’s Dom & The Wizards. Catchily titled The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale, we have album opener Cellophane Aeroplane for your listening pleasure. Following from the frantic slur of the Ana’s Little City 7″ and the paranoid mysticism of the vinyl-only release ‘The Ongoing Adventures’ LP, comes Dom & the Wizards’ latest inter dimensional translation – The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale. Band leader Dom Trimboli, of renowned Adelaide / Kaurna Country based group Wireheads, takes the listener on a staggered journey through tales of sinister whimsy, as though playing to an audience of sedated accountants, standing hand in hand humming nonchalantly as the world burns around them. The Wizards retreat from the world of increased chaos and the mathematicians that attempt to bring it to order, to unearth the simple pleasures of colourful, irreverent narrative. Trimboli takes us back to a world of fanciful tales, mystical heroes and kaleidoscopic exaggerations.

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On The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale, the Wizards’ playbook takes iconic form, becoming a clearer patchwork quilt of myth, literature, theology and anecdote, resembling a psychedelic late-night Wikipedia hole. Yearning for the times of the high renaissance, the molasses like glue of the album urges its listener to park their cars and write love letters to their neighbours they have never spoken to. Recorded in the grape vine dressed Adelaide Hills on Peramangk country at Milestone Studios by engineer Tom Spall.

“Cellophane Aeroplane” from Dom & The Wizards · Domenic Trimboli “The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale”  Tenth Court Records

Released April 2nd, 2021

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On May 28th, Melbourne-via-Tasmania jangle-pop quartet Quivers will release “Golden Doubt”, their second album (and first on Ba Da Bing Records), and the follow-up to their 2018 debut We’ll Go Riding on the Hearses and 2021 full-length cover of R.E.M.’s Out of Time. Lead single and Golden Doubt opener “Gutters of Love” begins simply with singer Sam Nicholson’s voice and a three-chord progression, building patiently to an achingly anthemic climax. Gleaming guitar work, vocal harmonies from Quivers members Holly Thomas and Bella Quinlan, and keen production courtesy of Matthew Redlich (Holy Holy, Husky, Ainslie Wills) all elevate the song into a bruised, yet beautiful rock anthem that makes its home in the fleeting space between joy and pain. “‘Gutters of Love’ is a song about serotonin levels but mostly about love.

We wanted a guitar song that was in love with love, but also knows a comedown is coming and you might need your friends to help you get through it,” Nicholson says in a statement. “That’s why the song is all Holly and Bella harmonies, big guitars, broken Farfisa organ, piano, and a shouty choir. It will be OK.”

Coming from Australia and the strong indie rock area of Melbourne music scene, Quivers have been releasing music for half-a-decade, since their initially self-released debut, “We’ll Go Riding On The Hearses”. After last year’s R.E.M covers of “Out Of Time”, the band are about to release their third record, “Golden Doubt”, due out in June as a co-release between an impressive collaboration between a trio of wonderful labels. Ahead of that release, this week the band have shared a brand-new track, “Gutters Of Love”.

Described by the band as, “a song about serotonin levels but mostly about love”, “Gutters Of Love” muses on the amount of time we all spend talking and thinking about love, whether we’re shouting across dance-floors or sitting on bedroom floors trying to make sense of it all. The track comes in on a muted chord-sequence, slowly morphing into something altogether more melodic, as an abundance of vocals and a wavering Farfisa organ lift it to a scream-along crescendo as a make-shift choir ask as one, “after the serotonin’s gone, could you ever fall in love?” 

Filmclip directed by the band from super 8 footage collected in late 2020 in Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia. Edited by Michael Panton. Thanks to our friends who appeared here & also Louie the dog and all the chickens.

Quivers have described Golden Doubt as a record about grief and what puts us back together; how with friends, music and a sense of humour, we somehow manage to find a way to keep-on-keeping-on.

Golden Doubt is out June 11th via Ba Da Bing Records (UK/North America), Bobo Integral (Europe).

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The three members of Australian trio The Goon Sax are keen to talk about the band’s second album, a meditative romp about breaking up and moving on called “We’re Not Talking”. for Louis Forster, Riley Jones, and James Harrison, a Goon Sax song speaks for all of them. “We really like honest music, and so being sincere and honest is something we wanted to do,” Forster explains. “If nothing else, that was achieved. Sometimes I don’t know whether the other things we wanted [the album] to be [happened], but we got there on the honesty.”

The members of the Goon Sax were only 17 when their first album, “Up to Anything”, was released — it positively ached with growing pains and almost every song was cringingly real as if it was cribbed from a diary and set to sparsely hooky guitar pop. After time spent touring the world, gaining experience, and graduating high school, the band set out to make a more mature second record. For 2018’s We’re Not Talking, they hired Cameron Bird and James Cecil of Architecture in Helsinki to produce, brought in some string players, and paid far more attention to the arrangements of the songs. They wanted the record to hew closely to their idea of what a pop record should sound like and despite some clashes with Bird and Cecil, who have different ideas about the concept of pop, this is a wonderfully poppy record in the best sense of the word. The songs are bright and bold, the strings swoop in occasionally to lift the songs into the skies, and there’s a refreshing lightness to everything that makes the still-somewhat-difficult nature of the subject matter go down more easily. They managed to build up and expand up their sound without losing the core of what made them special. Another change was adding drummer Riley Jones to the song writing roster to join Louis Forster and James Harrison. She also steps up to the mike to sing lead vocals on “Strange Light,” one of the album’s quieter moments.

For a band with high expectations, the three share a healthy level of modesty. “Natural selection’s going to get [our band],” says Forster, even though industry heads have kept tabs on him for the past four years as the son of Robert Forster from The Go-Betweens. His mate Harrison, who penned some of the most humbling moments on the album, still doubts his own humility.

Still, there’s lots of hard work in We’re Not Talking that the band can take pride in. The nuanced layers of strings and percussion interwoven across this album took almost two years to stitch together; and even then, the band spent another three weeks threading out the extra fluff. Forster plays this down at first-“We sucked out all the fun,” he quips-but Jones insists that they’ve shaped the record into a “rocket.”

They can also all agree that the old wounds confessed in the lyrics still fester. Forster wasn’t fibbing on “We Can’t Win,” where the protagonist cries as the bus drives past his girlfriend’s house. “The day that song came out, I was having a walk,” he says. “I don’t really walk that often, [and I was] right exactly where I was walking when I wrote those lyrics. It pretty much felt terrible as well. I felt terrible again, three years after that.

Both Forster and Harrison sound more confident as vocalists, especially Harrison. He sometimes sounded like he was hiding behind artifice on their debut, which made his songs less effective. The improvement in his vocals give his songs a boost, and they’ve gone from being skippable to some of the highlights. The rumbling folk-pop of “Love Lost” is a brilliant sketch of loneliness and confusion, “A Few Too Many” is a wonderfully breezy tune, and his duet with Jones on “Til the End” is a perfect balance of his tartness and her sweetness. Once again, Forster’s songs are the biggest and most immediate. “Make Time 4 Love” is the kind of expansive indie pop Belle and Sebastian forgot how to make years ago, “Sleep EZ” channels the early Go-Betweens and adds a giant hook, and “Get Out” is a wound-up rocker that shows the band has a tougher side.

Throughout the record, the production team of Bird and Cecil give the songs some depth and greater scope, adding nice touches like cowbell and keyboards that make the songs leap out of the speakers. It’s a great combination of sound and songs that makes good on the promise the band showed on their debut, and shows them navigating the numerous pitfalls of growing up as a band in fine fashion.

Over the course of three albums Australian psych band Babe Rainbow have built an enthusiastic fanbase with their neo-hippie psych pop style. They’ve lately found an unexpected fan in actor, activist, and musician Jaden Smith. After hearing “Us and the Rainbow” from the band’s 2019 album “Today”, Smith connected with the band over Instagram and one of the year’s most unexpected pairing was born.

Though the track may initially seem like an oddball pairing, Jaden fits seamlessly into Babe Rainbow’s world of languid melodies and dreamlike instrumentals. As usual with Babe Rainbow, the new track is a gentle psych pop daydream, with the band and Smith guiding listeners through a wonderland of velvety atmosphere and euphoric summer haze. 

Along with the new single, the band have also announced details of their forthcoming fourth studio album, Changing Colours. The band decamped to Topanga Canyon last year to record with producer Kyle Mullarky before returning to The Music Farm studio in Byron Bay, Australia to finish the record with Wayne Connelly (The Vines, Neil Finn, You Am I). Together the band honed a psych sound informed by California beaches, easy going Laurel Canyon pop, and a trippy haze of melody, all coming together on Changing Colours, coming May 14th via Eureka Records through AWAL on digital and Flightless Records on vinyl.

Babe Rainbow’s new album ‘Changing Colours’ will be released 14th May 2021.

Skegss Vinyl Giveaway

Hailed by Rolling Stone as “one of the most intoxicating acts to come out of Australia in years,” Byron Bay power trio Skegss deliver their new Catherine Marks (Manchester Orchestra, PJ Harvey, The Killers) produced album “Rehearsal”. A thrill ride through the band’s laissez-faire lifestyle and sun kissed narratives of love, friendship and youthful musings, they combine surf, garage, and slacker elements to create their dynamic sound here. The trippy cover art comes courtesy of frequent collaborator Jack Irvine

Released today, the highly-anticipated album from the Byron Bay rockers offers up 13 tracks of garage rock goodness.

Described as a “thrill ride through the band’s laissez-faire lifestyle and sunkissed narratives of love, friendship and youthful musings,” the second full-length record from Skegss sees the trio create a collection of tracks that “push the band’s ethos of rolling with the punches and making it out on top.”

Now that the album is finally out in the world, we thought we would celebrate it with everyone by running a very special Skegss giveaway!

Thanks to Loma Vista Recordings and Caroline Australia

New album “Rehearsal” Under exclusive license to Loma Vista Recordings. Distributed by Concord.

Khan from Melbourne, Australia meld hazy psychedelia and heavy stoner riffs with progressive rhythms and song structures. The songs are lyrically evocative, exuding a sense of despondency and vocally shift from gentle crooning to impassioned wailing. Mitchell Kerr’s driving bass mixed with Josh Bill’s chilling vocals and Beau Heffernan’s delicate drumming confirm 70’s prog still lives on fuzzed up and tripped out. The group does a fantastic job building up to impacts that feel as though they bring clarity but only for a moment before slipping back into misty noise. Defiantly a Table worth Turning

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Seriously intoxicating. So Dreamy Blend of Fuzz and Bluesy riffs that causes life-threatening Euphoria.

Released April 2nd, 2018

Josh Bills – Vocals/Guitar/Synth/Keys
Mitchell Kerr – Bass
Beau Heffernan – Drums

Recorded, produced, mixed and mastered by Josh Bills at Vagabond Studios

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From their first, self-titled EP in 2017, to debut album Lost Friends, the Sydney band has always had a knack for wrapping their listeners up in warmth and instant comfort. On their folow up album, “Today We’re The Greatest”, Middle Kids keep up that spirit of optimism. Yet in the song writing and delivery of its 12 tracks, “Today We’re The Greatest” feels more grown up. 

There’s no denying that Middle Kids are very good at what they do. They’re pros – consummate songwriters and performers. But what happens when the impressionable indie kids grow up? When life takes hold and points them in different directions, how does that affect the musical output?. For Middle Kids, it’s made for an album that reflects not just the change in their band and their personal lives, but also a realisation that your relationship with music can change over time.

“I want to make music that loves its listener,” songwriter Hannah Joy says. “Music that makes people feel seen, seen in the tiny little places that hide away in their hearts. I want people to hear our music, and feel a sense of love. And when I say love, it can be challenging, intense and tough. But it’s in the guts.” It’s an interesting way to describe music’s effects. When that unique connection is struck, a moving piece of music can make you cry, get you through, rile you up, make you intensely happy.

The way Today We’re The Greatest deploys Middle Kids’ sentimentality and romanticism stands out as one of its biggest drawcards. The front end of the album is stacked with moods. The slow burn of album opener ‘Bad Neighbours’ with its stream of consciousness storytelling. The shimmering nature of ‘Cellophane (Brain)’ that punches things into bright indie rock territory. 

Songs like ‘R U 4 Me?’ and ‘Questions’, which revel in the type of emotional upswings that could easily put them on an Arcade Fire record. 

Although all of the above are different in their energy and impact, the boldness that Middle Kids have applied to their production and creation – that we see throughout the rest of the album – shows how they themselves have changed in between albums. Notably, Hannah and bandmate/husband Tim Fitz were preparing to become first-time parents while making the album.

Recorded at the end of 2019, Today We’re The Greatest would be in mixing and post-production for much of 2020. It proved to be a shift of pace for Middle Kids who, before this point, had been living life largely on tour. Now, settled in Sydney with a new life about to come into the world, the band was given the opportunity to look at the way they made music differently. For the first time in a long time, they had the opportunity to breathe.

“We use the word ‘beauty’ in terms of shaping it,” Hannah said, reflecting on the recording process. “I think because we were trying to create more beautiful moments, there’s been a different emphasis [compared to] some of our older stuff. I think there’s beauty in there, but I think it’s been more edgy, empowering…those classic indie pop sounds. This has been about trying to sit in the space a little bit more and seeing what happens.”

Middle Kids’ forthcoming album ‘Today We’re The Greatest,’ out March 19th, 2021.

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Maple Glider’s aka Tori Zietsch striking emotionality is at the centre of her performances, leaning into an intimacy that is achieved by way of deeply personal reflections and velvety melodic compositions. Her vocals melt into layers of plucked acoustic guitar and lulling piano, drawing on the sombre styles of folk contemporaries with a stark tenderness and introspection that assumes the listener is inside her bedroom as she plays for herself. After experiencing falling in and out of love, traveling extensively, writing non-stop, and basking in the lengthy European summer hours, Tori returned to Melbourne late 2019 with a soundcloud account full to capacity of demos. Maple Glider was officially set to take flight.

Tori enlisted Tom Iansek (Big Scary, #1 Dads, The Paper Kites, Lisa Mitchell, Hockey Dad, ) to produce and record some of the many, many songs she was ready to get down. During the shared time spent at our studio BellBird, the wider team (Jo & Tom F. lol) got to fully appreciate the wonderful artistry and beauty of Maple Glider, and welcomed her to the family.
To date Maple Glider has released two gorgeous singles – “As Tradition” and “Good Thing”.

 Both songs’ music videos were made with creative collaborator and housemate Bridgette Winten, in the 5km radius around their Brunswick home (a limit due to COVID lockdown measures). Working with colour and contrast, and shot on Super 8, Maple Glider plays off her surroundings, whether it’s lush creek-beds, neighbourhood rose gardens, or a party for One at home.

We’re also very happy to announce we’ve teamed up with the very passionate Partisan Records (Laura Marling / Fela Kuti / Cigarettes After Sex / John Grant) to release Tori’s music all over the world!

Great songwriting, wonderful arranging and a great voice. electric first moment when you hear a song for the first time that sounds like a classic that’s been part of your soundtrack for years but you know you haven’t it’s just perfectly constructed. a restorative for the soul.

One of those special occasions when a new song becomes an instant classic in the blink of an eye – Triple J Unearthed

Beautiful and devastating… ‘Good Thing’ is a gorgeous indie folk number and a perfect example of that uninhibited, vulnerable quality. – American Songwriter

A series of hairs-on-the-back-of-your-arm moments – For The Rabbits

 ‘Good Thing’ is a delicate ballad, but with all the emotional resonance of a greek tragedy – The Rodeo

Channelling a rich and supple aesthetic throughout, her bold yet tortured voice reigns supreme on this light and airy composition – Mystic Sons

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Middle Kids from Sydney, Australia, will release sophomore album “Today We’re The Greatest” on March 19th via Domino Records. Today the Australian-based trio have released another single from the album with “Stacking Chairs,” which follows previously released singles such as “Questions.”

The band has found this sweet spot between chugging anthemic rock and an undeniable power-pop sound that combines to such a winning degree. The band toes the line between the two sounds so well. ‘Today We’re The Greatest’ is the second studio album from Australian indie-rock trio Middle Kids. Inspired by the marriage and parenthood of two of the band’s members – singer Hannah Joy and instrumentalist Tim Fitz – there’s an exuberance and openness here that was absent on 2018 debut ‘Lost Friends’.

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Written by Hannah Cameron and Timothy Fitzmaurice

Released October 15th, 2020

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Maple Glider is the project of Lismore-born, Melbourne-based songwriter Tori Zietsch, a brand new face on the scene. She’s also a brand new signing to Pieater, the Melbourne record label home to Big Scary, #1 Dads, Airling, and more. 

Zietsch originally rubbed shoulders with the label during their Pie School initiative, where she entered a winning demo and ended up recording a track with label head Tom Iansek and the crew. The single unfortunately never saw the light of day – it was recorded under a two-piece band Zietsch was in at the time which has since folded. The music I create as Maple Glider exists because I write to make sense of my experience, to learn, and because to me, it has always felt like my easiest form of communication. However, it wasn’t to be the end of her story. In 2019 Lansek was enlisted once again to produce and record a series of songs Zietsch had written for her solo project, Maple Glider. “As Tradition” was the first song to be released from that collection of tunes, and you can see why the label wanted to sign her.

My songs centre around the lyrics, exploring intimate themes that are often cathartic to write. I don’t have rules when I make music. I play around, express freely, let go of my expectations, have fun, and stay open

Many of you will know I started working with Pieater last year and it has been the best ever. More recently, I have signed to the incredible Partisan Records to release these songs worldwide. I am so grateful to be working with such a hard working and passionate group of people!!! I want to say a massive Thank You to everyone who has worked on the release of “Good Thing” and supported it thus far. It is a song very close to my heart and I’m damn lucky to be able to do this.