Posts Tagged ‘Australia’

Gang Of Youths (pic by Ed Cooke)

Aussie indie legends Gang Of Youths have announced their long-awaited third album – along with a massive nationwide tour to celebrate. Inspired by the passing of singer David Le’aupepe‘s father and his love of horticulture, “Angel In Realtime” is a love letter to family and the sacrifices people make along the way for the ones they love.

“My dad was a gifted and passionate gardener. It’s where he funnelled a lot of his energy and sensitivity, and despite our humble economic status, we were always surrounded by beauty,” the singer explained.

“The journey he made from Samoa to NZ to Australia was a difficult and inspiring one, but also fraught with mistakes, regret and terrible choices. I like to think he was building something beautiful,  and pondering what life had given him in spite of his mistakes and concealment. We never knew his story until after he died, so this is the most poetic interpretation of his affinity for gardening that I could think of.”

Le’aupepe added, “I hope the record stands as a monument to the man my father was and remains long after I’m gone myself. He deserved it.”

“Angel In Realtime” is slated for release 25th February 2022, check out their new single Tend The Garden 

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At this point, there’s no telling the heights Gang of Youths are set to climb. But as they continue to rise, their music is firmly rooted in where they’ve been. The Australian-born, London-based rock band seem to be filling an interesting void between pop-rock and indie, and after dropping the total serene EP earlier this year, are back with another lower-case, bigger-sound single called “the man himself.”

The track finds Gang of Youths singer Dave Le’aupepe meditating on the loss of his father, using his memory as a foundation to power forward and heal. “the man himself” is about grieving and loss, but also provides a compass on how to reflect the past in our future. “If I ever have kids,” Le’aupepe says, “I’m not really sure how to raise them without my dad helping me out.”

This anthemic, almost-hymnal track is a pretty good start. here is ‘the man himself’, a tune from our upcoming record. we love this track. listen out for ‘Imenetuki Mangaia’ at the song’s core, recorded by the wonderful David Fanshawe on the island of Mangaia a lifetime ago. the magnificent indigenous performers are the stars of the song, we can’t thank them enough

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Spacey Jane new single Lunchtime interview second album

Fremantle four-piece Spacey Jane have released their second single for the year, ‘Lunchtime’. Written at a time when frontman Caleb Harper was experiencing “severe hangover anxiety”, ‘Lunchtime’ is a quick-starting rock track that boasts in-your-face electric guitar riffs from Ashton Hardman-LeCornu. The single arrives with an accompanying music video from Matt Sav and Julia Jacklin collaborator Nick McKinlay. In the video, Harper leaves and returns to a formal lunch with his bandmates, getting battered and bruised in the process.

Following ‘Lots Of Nothing’, ‘Lunchtime’ is the band’s second new song since the June 2020 release of their debut album ‘Sunlight’. With four songs landing on triple j’s Hottest 100 last year – including ‘Booster Seat’ at Number Two – ‘Sunlight’ will be a hard act to follow. Spacey Jane haven’t let that put them off, though: their second album has already been recorded.

Speaking from his home in Fremantle, Harper explains the inspiration behind ‘Lunchtime’ and its music video, and how the track sits alongside Spacey Jane’s future musical plans.

 ‘Lunchtime’ is a very fun song for us. And it’s weird writing a really fast song. For me, I sort of do it intentionally, like: let’s do something fast and fun because it’s so good to play live. You really just get to rock around and the effect on the listener is quite immediate.

But the rest of the record is actually not really that fast, there’s a lot of slower stuff in there. This is definitely the most guitar-driven song on the album, I’d say. It feels like a more youthful, fun version of the kind of music that we make and we like it for that reason. We wanted to have it as a single just because we felt like it was like an outlier in some ways to what the rest of the record might end up being.

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Melbourne lo-fi rock duo Good Morning have built quite an impressive resume for themselves despite flying largely under the radar for much of their career. Melbourne’s slacker jangle pop outfit Good Morning join the Dinked series with their latest landing on exclusive wax with a poster insert.

The two high school friends have been making bright and breezy tunes together for almost a decade now, and ‘Barnyard’ hears them at their most melodic and attentive to the outside world. The pair recorded the album at Wilco’s Loft studio following a US tour, and is set for release in October.

They’ve had a consistent output of short albums, EPs and singles over the years, their song “Warned You” has become a veritable indie hit, and A$AP Rocky even sampled their song “Don’t Come Home Today” on his last album Testing. The duo’s new album “The Option” is largely devoid of the hazy psych trappings of their past, but it’s also their most sprawling and fully realized record to date.

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‘Barnyard’ sees Australian lo-fi slacker-indie duo Good Morning firmly settling into the laidback sound they brought us on 2019’s ‘Basketball Breakups’. This is an LP of off-kilter, gently strummed melodies and jangling lead guitar lines. Their influences come from the likes of SmogSebadohPavement and the Flying Nun roster.
“The Option” includes 8 new rock songs by the band Good Morning.
Good Morning are played this time by Stefan Blair, John Considine, James Macleod & Liam Parsons.
released April 5th, 2019

based off the short film ‘cornerstone’ (2009) by Richard Ayoade taken from the album ‘The Option’ out now

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After Re-emerging recently, Gang of Youths have officially released ‘The Angel of 8th Ave’.

Self-produced and recorded in their own studio in Hackney, the single arrives with a Joel Barney-directed music video filmed in the Aussie band’s adopted town of Angel, Islington North London and meets all your charismatic, dancing Dave Le’aupepe needs. 

Built on a surging tempo and gritty bassline ornamented with shiny acoustic strums, Le’aupepe says ‘The Angel of 8th Ave’ was inspired by “falling in love, and finding a new life in a new city together.”

It’s at once an ode to the frontman’s wife and to the band’ relocation to the U.K after 2017 album Go Farther In Lightness made them one of Australia’s most celebrated bands. The track has the same electric indie rock grandiosity of that record, right down to the familiar way Le’aupepe stakes his romance in big poetics:  

You called each of my sorrows by name, and a tide of tender mercies shook my body from the grave in the festival years of our makeshift parade, Through perpetual fall and immeasurable rain.

As far as comebacks go, ‘The Angel of 8th Ave’ plays it relatively safe. But don’t expect that to be entirely the case for Gang Of Youths’ next body of work.

“This is probably the only song that sounds anything like what we used to do, if I’m honest,” Dave Le’aupepe tells us

He confirms that a new project is coming “at some point in the next year or so” and that ‘The Angel of 8th Ave’ was written a few years ago and underwent “15 versions” before landing on what is “about as close to what people would have Gang of Youths as in 2017, when we did our last anything…”

“That’s probably by design. I think easing people who love what you’ve done into something that’s extremely different or could potentially polarise people is what we wanted to do with this track.”

The Murlocs fifth studio album, Bittersweet Demons is dropping June 25th! On the band’s most personal and boldly confident work yet, The Murlocs share a collection of songs reflecting on the people who leave a profound imprint on our lives, the saviours and hell-raisers and assorted other mystifying characters. Pre-order the Blue-Eyed Runner vinyl now in the ATO shop, shipping June 18th.

‘Eating At You’ is OUT NOW!! John Angus Stewart.Here’s a couple words for you about the meaning behind it all. “ It’s an ode to all the loveable train wrecks out there that have gone off the rails and keep going back for more. The never-ending vortex cycle. Some seem to never learn their lesson even when it smacks them right in the face constantly. It’s important to address these issues before disaster strikes and it’s too late. Never give up on your loved ones when they’re in need of a helping hand.”

“On their fifth album “Bittersweet Demons“, The Murlocs share a collection of songs reflecting on the people who leave a profound imprint on our lives: The saviours and hellraisers and assorted other mystifying characters. From the 11 infectious tracks emerges a beautifully complex body of work, one that shines a light on the fragilities of human nature while inducing the glorious head rush that accompanies any Murlocs outing.”

From The Murlocs new album “Bittersweet Demons” out June 25, 2021

Come on a journey of kaleidoscopic and sinister whimsy with the new album from Australia’s Dom & The Wizards. Catchily titled The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale, we have album opener Cellophane Aeroplane for your listening pleasure. Following from the frantic slur of the Ana’s Little City 7″ and the paranoid mysticism of the vinyl-only release ‘The Ongoing Adventures’ LP, comes Dom & the Wizards’ latest inter dimensional translation – The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale. Band leader Dom Trimboli, of renowned Adelaide / Kaurna Country based group Wireheads, takes the listener on a staggered journey through tales of sinister whimsy, as though playing to an audience of sedated accountants, standing hand in hand humming nonchalantly as the world burns around them. The Wizards retreat from the world of increased chaos and the mathematicians that attempt to bring it to order, to unearth the simple pleasures of colourful, irreverent narrative. Trimboli takes us back to a world of fanciful tales, mystical heroes and kaleidoscopic exaggerations.

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On The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale, the Wizards’ playbook takes iconic form, becoming a clearer patchwork quilt of myth, literature, theology and anecdote, resembling a psychedelic late-night Wikipedia hole. Yearning for the times of the high renaissance, the molasses like glue of the album urges its listener to park their cars and write love letters to their neighbours they have never spoken to. Recorded in the grape vine dressed Adelaide Hills on Peramangk country at Milestone Studios by engineer Tom Spall.

“Cellophane Aeroplane” from Dom & The Wizards · Domenic Trimboli “The Australian Cyclone Intensity Scale”  Tenth Court Records

Released April 2nd, 2021

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On May 28th, Melbourne-via-Tasmania jangle-pop quartet Quivers will release “Golden Doubt”, their second album (and first on Ba Da Bing Records), and the follow-up to their 2018 debut We’ll Go Riding on the Hearses and 2021 full-length cover of R.E.M.’s Out of Time. Lead single and Golden Doubt opener “Gutters of Love” begins simply with singer Sam Nicholson’s voice and a three-chord progression, building patiently to an achingly anthemic climax. Gleaming guitar work, vocal harmonies from Quivers members Holly Thomas and Bella Quinlan, and keen production courtesy of Matthew Redlich (Holy Holy, Husky, Ainslie Wills) all elevate the song into a bruised, yet beautiful rock anthem that makes its home in the fleeting space between joy and pain. “‘Gutters of Love’ is a song about serotonin levels but mostly about love.

We wanted a guitar song that was in love with love, but also knows a comedown is coming and you might need your friends to help you get through it,” Nicholson says in a statement. “That’s why the song is all Holly and Bella harmonies, big guitars, broken Farfisa organ, piano, and a shouty choir. It will be OK.”

Coming from Australia and the strong indie rock area of Melbourne music scene, Quivers have been releasing music for half-a-decade, since their initially self-released debut, “We’ll Go Riding On The Hearses”. After last year’s R.E.M covers of “Out Of Time”, the band are about to release their third record, “Golden Doubt”, due out in June as a co-release between an impressive collaboration between a trio of wonderful labels. Ahead of that release, this week the band have shared a brand-new track, “Gutters Of Love”.

Described by the band as, “a song about serotonin levels but mostly about love”, “Gutters Of Love” muses on the amount of time we all spend talking and thinking about love, whether we’re shouting across dance-floors or sitting on bedroom floors trying to make sense of it all. The track comes in on a muted chord-sequence, slowly morphing into something altogether more melodic, as an abundance of vocals and a wavering Farfisa organ lift it to a scream-along crescendo as a make-shift choir ask as one, “after the serotonin’s gone, could you ever fall in love?” 

Filmclip directed by the band from super 8 footage collected in late 2020 in Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia. Edited by Michael Panton. Thanks to our friends who appeared here & also Louie the dog and all the chickens.

Quivers have described Golden Doubt as a record about grief and what puts us back together; how with friends, music and a sense of humour, we somehow manage to find a way to keep-on-keeping-on.

Golden Doubt is out June 11th via Ba Da Bing Records (UK/North America), Bobo Integral (Europe).

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The three members of Australian trio The Goon Sax are keen to talk about the band’s second album, a meditative romp about breaking up and moving on called “We’re Not Talking”. for Louis Forster, Riley Jones, and James Harrison, a Goon Sax song speaks for all of them. “We really like honest music, and so being sincere and honest is something we wanted to do,” Forster explains. “If nothing else, that was achieved. Sometimes I don’t know whether the other things we wanted [the album] to be [happened], but we got there on the honesty.”

The members of the Goon Sax were only 17 when their first album, “Up to Anything”, was released — it positively ached with growing pains and almost every song was cringingly real as if it was cribbed from a diary and set to sparsely hooky guitar pop. After time spent touring the world, gaining experience, and graduating high school, the band set out to make a more mature second record. For 2018’s We’re Not Talking, they hired Cameron Bird and James Cecil of Architecture in Helsinki to produce, brought in some string players, and paid far more attention to the arrangements of the songs. They wanted the record to hew closely to their idea of what a pop record should sound like and despite some clashes with Bird and Cecil, who have different ideas about the concept of pop, this is a wonderfully poppy record in the best sense of the word. The songs are bright and bold, the strings swoop in occasionally to lift the songs into the skies, and there’s a refreshing lightness to everything that makes the still-somewhat-difficult nature of the subject matter go down more easily. They managed to build up and expand up their sound without losing the core of what made them special. Another change was adding drummer Riley Jones to the song writing roster to join Louis Forster and James Harrison. She also steps up to the mike to sing lead vocals on “Strange Light,” one of the album’s quieter moments.

For a band with high expectations, the three share a healthy level of modesty. “Natural selection’s going to get [our band],” says Forster, even though industry heads have kept tabs on him for the past four years as the son of Robert Forster from The Go-Betweens. His mate Harrison, who penned some of the most humbling moments on the album, still doubts his own humility.

Still, there’s lots of hard work in We’re Not Talking that the band can take pride in. The nuanced layers of strings and percussion interwoven across this album took almost two years to stitch together; and even then, the band spent another three weeks threading out the extra fluff. Forster plays this down at first-“We sucked out all the fun,” he quips-but Jones insists that they’ve shaped the record into a “rocket.”

They can also all agree that the old wounds confessed in the lyrics still fester. Forster wasn’t fibbing on “We Can’t Win,” where the protagonist cries as the bus drives past his girlfriend’s house. “The day that song came out, I was having a walk,” he says. “I don’t really walk that often, [and I was] right exactly where I was walking when I wrote those lyrics. It pretty much felt terrible as well. I felt terrible again, three years after that.

Both Forster and Harrison sound more confident as vocalists, especially Harrison. He sometimes sounded like he was hiding behind artifice on their debut, which made his songs less effective. The improvement in his vocals give his songs a boost, and they’ve gone from being skippable to some of the highlights. The rumbling folk-pop of “Love Lost” is a brilliant sketch of loneliness and confusion, “A Few Too Many” is a wonderfully breezy tune, and his duet with Jones on “Til the End” is a perfect balance of his tartness and her sweetness. Once again, Forster’s songs are the biggest and most immediate. “Make Time 4 Love” is the kind of expansive indie pop Belle and Sebastian forgot how to make years ago, “Sleep EZ” channels the early Go-Betweens and adds a giant hook, and “Get Out” is a wound-up rocker that shows the band has a tougher side.

Throughout the record, the production team of Bird and Cecil give the songs some depth and greater scope, adding nice touches like cowbell and keyboards that make the songs leap out of the speakers. It’s a great combination of sound and songs that makes good on the promise the band showed on their debut, and shows them navigating the numerous pitfalls of growing up as a band in fine fashion.

Over the course of three albums Australian psych band Babe Rainbow have built an enthusiastic fanbase with their neo-hippie psych pop style. They’ve lately found an unexpected fan in actor, activist, and musician Jaden Smith. After hearing “Us and the Rainbow” from the band’s 2019 album “Today”, Smith connected with the band over Instagram and one of the year’s most unexpected pairing was born.

Though the track may initially seem like an oddball pairing, Jaden fits seamlessly into Babe Rainbow’s world of languid melodies and dreamlike instrumentals. As usual with Babe Rainbow, the new track is a gentle psych pop daydream, with the band and Smith guiding listeners through a wonderland of velvety atmosphere and euphoric summer haze. 

Along with the new single, the band have also announced details of their forthcoming fourth studio album, Changing Colours. The band decamped to Topanga Canyon last year to record with producer Kyle Mullarky before returning to The Music Farm studio in Byron Bay, Australia to finish the record with Wayne Connelly (The Vines, Neil Finn, You Am I). Together the band honed a psych sound informed by California beaches, easy going Laurel Canyon pop, and a trippy haze of melody, all coming together on Changing Colours, coming May 14th via Eureka Records through AWAL on digital and Flightless Records on vinyl.

Babe Rainbow’s new album ‘Changing Colours’ will be released 14th May 2021.