Posts Tagged ‘Josh Salter’

We’ve already shared the excellent “Mark Zuckerberg” single from Nap Eyes, and now we have the latest track from their upcoming album “Snapshot of a Beginner”, which is out on the 27th March via Jagjaguwar Records.

“So Tired” is a change of pace from the irrepressible catchiness of the last single, a more mournful, resigned slice of slacker rock that just begs for a hot water bottle and a blanket.

The process of arranging this with Nap Eyes and ultimately recording it at Long Pond Studio with producers James Elkington and Jon Low was also a great experience. James added his characteristic insight as well as some beautiful lap steel playing to the arrangement, and Jon captured and chiselled out a performance from the band that still reflects our straightforward roots, while giving the recording a depth and shimmer that constitute new territory for us. It was pretty unreal working with those two in that studio, which is a beautiful, high-ceiling’d, converted barn that feels and sounds very good to be in. I’ll conclude by saying, I feel very grateful we got to journey with this simple song from its rough inception all the way through to the version you can hear on Snapshot of a Beginner today.”

“This song was written, I’m estimating here, sometime in the winter or spring of 2017 in my home city of Halifax, Nova Scotia. It came about as part of a song writing club comprised of myself and my friends Caleb Glasser (Fake Buildings) and Danika Vandersteen (Old & Weird). Incidentally, Caleb also wrote the lyrics for the Nap Eyes song “Mark Zuckerberg” as part of this club, which I subsequently put to music. Anyway, this particular song came about in a typical way on a sunny afternoon, as I was strumming a few chords in my bedroom, trying out lyrical ideas. Generally speaking, I do not know what I’m going to sing or write about when I sit down and start to say or sing phrases, and this song was no exception. I remember liking the sound of the verse chord progression— E, B, F#min, A, which suggested a basic melody. Four-chord progressions like this often remind me of Green Day, who have remained one of my favourite bands since I first heard them as a 10 or 11 year old kid. And I think there is usually some of that old mood-energy influence that comes through in my song writing at times like this.

With all this being said, the lyrics of ‘Even Though I Can’t Read Your Mind’ address some of the social and psychological challenges that tend to come up when human beings interact. As a fairly shy and introverted person myself, a lot of what I think and feel in any given social situation tends to remain unsaid. At the same time, when it comes to the minds of other people, it’s often necessary for me to remind myself that I have no clear view of what they are thinking and feeling, to say nothing of any judgments they might be forming about me. In this sense, singing the song acts as a kind of balancing or calibrating device for my social brain: on the one hand I’m reminded that, even when I think I know what others are thinking, I really don’t. And on the other, I’m able to affirm the social signs I do see, even discordant ones, and this helps me to adapt to challenging situations while protecting the integrity of my self-concept—what in psychoanalysis is called ego strength.

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Nap Eyes are releasing a new album, Snapshot of a Beginner, on Jagjaguwar/Royal Mountain in partnership with Paradise of Bachelors. On Tuesday they shared another song from the album, “So Tired,” via a lyric video. It features a sublime guitar solo towards the end.

In a press release frontman Nigel Chapman had this to say about “So Tired”: “The ‘So Tired’ refrain marks a slight shift in perspective and its meaning is twofold. For one, I get frustrated sometimes by what the world seems to require for success at a given task (for example, polished songwriting, coherent and understandable communication), so part of this is just me venting on this subject. Sometimes I would rather flow with free writing than try to box songs into rehearsed, many-times-repeated containers.

“Second, at times I find myself wishing people would not hold so many preconceptions about the things in this world a given person might try to communicate. Most of us, myself included, usually assume we already know a lot – even about things we’ve spent very little time thinking about – and because of this attitude, people are often predisposed to misunderstand new ideas, even when they’re communicated in straightforward and coherent ways. But there’s no doubt, an idea won’t ever get through until there’s someone around to listen to it.”

Previously Nap Eyes shared Snapshot of a Beginner’s first single, “Mark Zuckerberg,” via a video for the song (which of course tackles the founder of Facebook).

Nap Eyes features frontman Nigel Chapman, drummer Seamus Dalton, bassist Josh Salter, and guitarist Brad Loughead. Jonathan Low (Big Red Machine, The National) and James Elkington (Steve Gunn, Joan Shelley) produced Snapshot of a Beginner, which was recorded at The National’s Upstate New York Long Pond Studio.

Releases March 27th, 2020

Nap Eyes will release their new album, “Snapshot of a Beginner”, their most concentrated and hi-fi effort to date, on March 27th via Jagjaguwar / Royal Mountain, in partnership with Paradise of Bachelors. Throughout the album, there’s an immediately noticeable leap in arrangement and muscle, one that still holds the raw, nervous energy and the earnest, self-deprecating poetry that make Nap Eyes an enduring cult favorite. The music still brings to mind the bucolic ennui of the Silver Jews and Daniel Johnston’s jittery naïveté, but the new sheen and maturity also now brings to mind the wide-angle appeal of The Jayhawks and the addictive brightness of Green Day’s Kerplunk!.

Lead single “Mark Zuckerberg” is a hi-fi jangle-pop earworm that, at its outset, sounds like it could be the theme song from Party of Five. Less a takedown of any one specific, capitalist tech fascist than it is a poem about the confounding and beautiful swirl of modern life, it is their thoughtful, incisive Hit for The People. “Transcendence is all around us,” Chapman repeats, a freeing incantation and a gift to us all as the coda slows and expands.

On the video, the band notes: “People are scared of Mark Zuckerberg. You look at him before Congress and think, ‘Is this the bogeyman? Is he a CIA plant? Can he read my mind with some sort of God-mode search feature in all my chat transcripts?’ This video leads us to believe that Mark wants to enjoy and surveil whatever world he inhabits, whether it’s starting a band with ghastly apparitions in the spirit realm or changing size according to his whim while observing natural and urban landscapes with equal awe. He wants you to accept his friend request and let him watch over you. ‘When there was only one set of footprints in the sand…’”

Almost all the songs of Nap Eyes are whittled into their final form from frontman Nigel Chapman’s unspooling, 20-minute voice-and-guitar free-writing sessions. Each member — drummer Seamus Dalton, bassist Josh Salter and guitarist Brad Loughead — then plays a crucial role in song development, composing around the idiosyncratic structures and directing the overall sound and feel of the songs.

‘Mark Zuckerberg’ from ’Snapshot of a Beginner’ by Nap Eyes, available March 27th, 2020 on Jagjaguwar

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Nap Eyes are a remarkably consistent band. Their 2015 debut, Whine of the Mystic, contains nine tracks of breezy, itinerant indie rock that only occasionally rambles on too long. The follow-up, 2016’s Thought Rock Fish Scale, does more or less the same thing. So the question for these Canadian crypto-jammers is: mix it up on LP3 or nah? I’m Bad Now is another reliable work of songs from Nap Eyes, with stronger melodies and more consistency across the board.

Nap Eyes are a remarkably consistent band. Their 2015 debut, Whine of the Mystic, contains nine tracks of breezy, itinerant indie rock that only occasionally rambles on too long. The follow-up, 2016’s Thought Rock Fish Scale, does more or less the same thing. So the question for these Canadian crypto-jammers is: mix it up on LP3 or nah? I’m Bad Now is another reliable slab from Nap Eyes, with stronger melodies and more consistency across the board.

Band Members
Nigel Chapman, Seamus Dalton, Josh Salter, Brad “Bronson” Loughead,

Nap Eyes ‘I’m Bad Now’, out March 9th, 2018 on Paradise of Bachelors / You’ve Changed / Jagjaguwar’