Archive for the ‘MUSIC’ Category

Lookman Adekunle Salami -aka ‘L.A. Salami’ – is a rare breed of musician that the world has been craving since the height of storytelling legends like Joni Mitchell, Paul Simon and Neil Young. Not quite folk, not quite indy, not quite common and certainly not boring, L.A. Salami’s lyricism and voice are hypnotic, His new album ‘The Cause of Doubt & A Reason To Have Faith’ is out now,

The LP  sees Lookman explore experimental ground, touching on a bit of everything from rap to psychedelic folk, and sultry grooves which venture into extended hypnotic jams. This isn’t the music of a virtuoso: it’s explorative, daring, meditative and wild.  Lookman describes the inspiration behind his new album,  “I love the deliberateness, cleanness and colour of modern music, but I also miss the complete chaos of old, like some Captain Beefheart and Velvet Underground records, or even 90s HipHop records with the peaking 808s and static compressed vocals al la Wu Tang, or blues records like Robert Johnson’s. Somewhere in there is the carnival I’ve been searching for. This entire album could very well be a love letter to Lou Reed and The Velvet Underground.”

Lookman began writing poetry at a very early age, which then evolved into writing lyrics and he taught himself the guitar aged 21. Fostered from birth, Lookman was periodically re-united with his birth mother from the age of 5, which he describes as being emotionally confusing, “I find it rears its ugly head consistently in my life, and music became one of the easiest ways to release that pressure valve every so often.”

L.A. Salami’s two albums to date, ‘Dancing With Bad Grammar’ (2016) and ‘The City of Bootmakers’ (2018), have seen the London-based artist present a singular vision. His evocative, poetic lyrics span everything from grand existential questions to vignettes of everyday life as well as the affairs and anxieties of modern Britain.

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Released July 17th, 2020

This may need a little explaining… so back when everything first started with the pandemic, I was wrapping up the tracking of what would be my 4th album. It’s a pretty groovy spin, maybe some of my best yet? That record is done and I’m very excited for you to hear it, but that IS NOT this record. This is Sugar Water... an odd little collection of songs that will be out in early September. Songs about witches, Greyhounds, real hounds, the best singer in Abilene (also a hound), evil motorcycle riding grandmothers, and the best Hummingbird nectar on the market.

Typically when announcing an album, you have a track list and it’s all finished; however, that isn’t the case here. Right now, there are 7 songs. My hope is to write and record 3 more between now and September. Here’s the first single! It’s called Rising Sign and it isn’t anything at all about the subject matter I mentioned earlier… Cheers Sugar Water... my 5th album… out before the 4th one.

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This song is the first single for Sugar Water… An album that will likely be out in early September.
Released August 7th, 2020

Frank Zappa documentary

A new documentary will offer an in-depth look at the singular life and work of pioneering artist, Frank Zappa. Directed by Bill & Ted star Alex Winter (The Panama Papers, Downloaded), Zappa is set for release over Thanksgiving Weekend, via Magnolia Pictures. the film has been described as “an intimate and expansive look into the innovative life of the iconic – and iconoclastic – musician and artist.” Deadline also confirmed that the film will delve into “the private life behind the musical career that never shied away from the political turbulence of its time,” thanks to a trove of archival content.

Fans can also expect new and archival interviews from a variety of friends, family members, and collaborators, including the musician’s late widow, Gail Zappa, as well as from Mothers of Invention multi-instrumentalist Ian Underwood; guitar virtuoso Steve Vai; author, musician, actress, and Zappa-family-nanny, Pamela Des Barre; Kronos Quartet founder David Harrington; bassist Scott Thunes, and many others. The excellence of Frank Zappa with magnificent sound recorded at various venues on the 1981 tour (except for 3 tracks from Fall 1980) with some studio overdubs added at Zappa’s home recording studio.
To my information tracks from this that appear on official albums have extensive overdubs and different mixes.

“Alex Winter has created an amazing documentary,” said Magnolia President Eamonn Bowles in a statement. “Zappa is an incredibly nuanced and compelling look at the visionary iconoclast and the environment that formed him.” Winter added, “This is the most ambitious project I’ve ever worked on, with a couple years of archival preservation in addition to several years to make the film itself. This isn’t your typical music doc but rather a multi-faceted narrative that aims to bring this complex artist to life.”

More recently, Zappa’s work with his band The Mothers was celebrated in a new 4CD and digital collection of 70 unreleased live and studio recordings engineered by the then-unknown producer Roy Thomas Baker, which make up the box set’s first disc. Overseen by the Zappa Trust and produced by Ahmet Zappa and Zappa Vaultmeister, Joe Travers, The Mothers 1970 collects together more than four hours of previously unreleased performances by the heralded line-up which lasted roughly seven months in 1970.

Dawes press photo 2020

Dawes have released “St. Augustine At Night” as another preview of their first album for Rounder Records, and seventh studio release overall, “Good Luck With Whatever,” which is due on October 2nd. Says Goldsmith: “‘St. Augustine at Night’ is a song about one’s relationship to their hometown, but also is a song about the varying degrees in which we all watch our lives pass us by.”  The five-minute track strikes a confessional, reflective air, with simple accompaniment to frontman Taylor Goldsmith’s vocals by acoustic guitar and piano. The band, also featuring Griffin Goldsmith (drums), Wylie Gelber (bass) and Lee Pardini (keys), introduced “St. Augustine At Night” at some of their shows on their 2019 tour.

It’s been 11 years (next month) since L.A. rockers Dawes launched dual residencies that fueled the success of their debut album “North Hills” and cemented them as Southern California favourites. Six albums later, their take on Everyman classic rock has aged well — familiar, earnest, relatable music that wears like denim.

The quartet — Taylor and Griffin Goldsmith, Wylie Gerber and Lee Pardini — today announced that their seventh album, “Good Luck With Whatever,” will be out October. 2nd. It’s their first release for Rounder Records.

“In the past, I’ve definitely been more precious about the way I wanted the songs to sound, but that’s never as fun,” Taylor Goldsmith says of the album. “The music we make is everyone’s mode of expression, and the other guys all have chops that I don’t have and never will. The fact that we’re able to lean on each other and celebrate each other as individuals just makes us so much more excited about getting to play together in this band.”

The first single “Who Do you Think You’re Talking To?” is a saxophone short of a blue-jeaned Springsteen, the kind of tune you blare on the open road. “This song is about the way we bring our baggage with us as we move away from traumatic experiences and relationships,” Goldsmith says. “And the irony of sometimes our newer partners needing to be part of the processing more so than the folks who caused the trouble in the first place. It’s also about the other side of that coin — trying to assess a situation but knowing when not to take it personally and also finding a way to avoid over-analyzing.

“As a band, it was the first time we’ve ventured into certain grooves/arrangements for our tunes, so it was fun to push ourselves, see what felt natural and what we could get away with.”

The album was produced by six-time Grammy winner Dave Cobb (Chris Stapleton, Brandi Carlile, Jason Isbell) at Nashville’s RCA Studio A. Caitlin Gerard directs the video.

In June, Dawes released “Live From Richmond, VA,” a digital album with proceeds going to Reform Jails LA and Black Lives Matter LA.  In the midst of all this changing and learning and growing we have decided to release ‘Live From Richmond’ as a digital download on @bandcamp with 100% of our proceeds being split 50/50 between @reformlajails and @blmlosangeles. Please check out both organizations if you have the chance.
Yesterday someone I admire told me that this is the first time they have felt hopeful in years. I’ve got a lot of work to do and this is barely just the beginning….but I feel hopeful too. And that feels so good. I hope you enjoy the music. Link in the bio. – TG The band’s last studio album was 2018’s Passwords, the last of three on HUB Records. 

Band Members:
Wylie Gelber,
Taylor Goldsmith,
Griffin Goldsmith,
Lee Pardini,

The-Beatles-Revolver

(It was 50 years ago today! August. 5th in 1966: The Beatles ‘Revolver’ album was released in the UK (August. 8th in the US); it was the band’s 7th studio release featured the likes of “Taxman”, “Eleanor Rigby”, “I’m Only Sleeping”, “Here, There & Everywhere”, “She Said She Said”, “And Your Bird Can Sing” & “Tomorrow Never Knows”; it reached #1 on both the UK (seven weeks) & US (six weeks) charts; in a 1967 article for ‘Esquire’, music journalist Robert Christgau called the album “twice as good & four times as startling as ‘Rubber Soul’, with sound effects, Oriental drones, jazz bands, transcendentalist lyrics, all kinds of rhythmic & harmonic surprises, & a filter that made John Lennon sound like God singing through a foghorn”; Rolling Stone ranked it #3 on their list of ‘The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time’…

“Revolver” is the seventh studio album by the English rock band The Beatles, released on the Parlophone label and produced by George Martin. Many of the tracks on Revolver are marked by an electric guitar-rock sound, in contrast with their previous LP, the folk rock inspired Rubber Soul (1965). In Britain, the fourteen tracks from Revolver were released to radio stations throughout July 1966, “building anticipation for what would clearly be a radical new phase in the group’s recording career”. The album was remastered 9th September 2009 for the first time since its 1987 digital compact disc release. the album is often regarded as one of the greatest achievements in music history and one of The Beatles’ greatest studio achievements.

We’d had acid on Revolver. Everyone is under this illusion… even George Martin saying ‘Pepper was their acid album,’ but we’d had acid, including Paul, by the time Revolver was finished. … Rubber Soul was our pot album, and Revolver was acid.  John Lennon, Sept 1971, St. Regis Hotel, NYC

Unlike our previous LPs, this one is intended to show our versatility rather than a haphazard collection of songs. We use trumpets, violins and cellos to achieve new effects. George has written three of the tracks. On past LPs he never did more than two and Ringo sings, or rather talks, a children’s song. This is all part of our idea of being up-to-date and including something for everybody. We don’t intend to go back and revive ideas of twenty years ago. Paul McCartney, 1966

The Beatles had initiated a second pop revolution – one which while galvanising their existing rivals and inspiring many new ones, left all of them far behind.
~Ian MacDonald (Revolution in the Head: The Beatles’ Records and the Sixties) ….. Either way, its daring sonic adventures and consistently stunning songcraft set the standard for what pop/rock could achieve. Even after Sgt. Pepper, Revolver stands as the ultimate modern pop album and it’s still as emulated as it was upon its original release.
~Stephen Thomas Erlewine (allmusic.com)

Recorded on 6th April – 21st June 1966, at EMI Studios, London

All the rules fell by the wayside with Revolver, as the Beatles began exploring new sonic territory, lyrical subjects, and styles of composition. It wasn’t just Lennon and McCartney, either — Harrison staked out his own dark territory with the tightly wound, cynical rocker “Taxman”; the jaunty yet dissonant “I Want to Tell You”; and “Love You To,” George’s first and best foray into Indian music. Such explorations were bold, yet they were eclipsed by Lennon’s trippy kaleidoscopes of sound. His most straightforward number was “Doctor Robert,” an ode to his dealer, and things just got stranger from there as he buried “And Your Bird Can Sing” in a maze of multi-tracked guitars, gave Ringo a charmingly hallucinogenic slice of childhood whimsy in “Yellow Submarine,” and then capped it off with a triptych of bad trips: the spiraling “She Said She Said”; the crawling, druggy “I’m Only Sleeping”; and “Tomorrow Never Knows,” a pure nightmare where John sang portions of the Tibetan Book of the Dead into a suspended microphone over Ringo’s thundering, menacing drumbeats and layers of overdubbed, phased guitars and tape loops…

It may seem like an odd introduction to one of the Beatles’ more important and experimental albums. Written as a children’s song, “Yellow Submarine” made an impression at the time, but my fondness for Revolver only grew as I did and learned about what it really meant, about the impact it had for the band and for music. Now that I’m a music writer and proudly own their albums—on vinyl, Revolver offers an entirely different listening experience. Hearing it now, “Yellow Submarine” doesn’t quite fit, and yet it somehow does. Revolver is an amalgamation of different styles and genres, and the Beatles excelled at all of them.

The band was heavily involved with drugs at the time—the most mild being marijuana with Lennon becoming more interested in LSD—and questioning their musical identities among other more existential inquisitions. Pair that metaphysical exploration with three months in the studio after they retired from touring and the result is an album that defies the limits often ascribed to music genres.

If one thing in particular defines Revolver, it’s the fact that it evades the Western notion of meaning; of a definitive beginning, middle and end. “Tomorrow Never Knows,” the first song the Beatles recorded for the album and the final track on it, served not as the period to a complete sentence but as a pathway back to the start again. As Ian MacDonald noted in his book Revolution in the Head, part of the song’s instrumental break contains Paul McCartney’s guitar solo (chopped up and played backwards) from “Taxman,” the album’s opening track.  However minutely, the album’s last song references its first, and in doing so presents something closer to a cyclical chant that’s meant to go on and on and on.

Even Revolver’s title referred to a continual loop, but with a keener self-referential touch. McCartney observed that albums “revolved,” so Revolver became an album about albums—about making them and defying what that typically entailed. The now oft-quoted lyric from “Tomorrow Never Knows,” “Turn off your mind, relax and float downstream,” which John Lennon pulled from Timothy Leary’s LSD drug manual The Psychedelic Experience (which itself is an adaptation of The Book of the Dead), presents a challenge to listeners used to albums being a certain way. Are you willing to let go of any preconceptions you have of pop music? Are you willing to do away with any clear categorized notion of “the Beatles?”

How influential was “Tomorrow Never Knows” exactly? It’s always celebrated by rock and pop magazines, but even dance music magazine Muzik ranked it as one of the most influential records of all time, saying “Every idea ever used in dance music exists in this song. ” Again, this is on the same album with “Yellow Submarine,” the string octet of “Eleanor Rigby” and the garage rock of “Taxman.”

By the time of Revolver, Paul McCartney had developed an interest in more classical sounds, which arise in the French horn on “For No One” and the orchestration in “Eleanor Rigby.” But George Harrison went in a different direction. He preferred sounds that lay farther East. “Love You To” integrates Hidustani classical instrumentation and juxtaposes McCartney’s sound at the time as well as the other two songs Harrison contributed to Revolver, “Taxman” and “I Want to Tell You.” Harrison said in 1980, “’Norwegian Wood’ was an accident as far as the sitar part was concerned, but [‘Love You To’] was the first song where I consciously tried to use the sitar and tabla on the basic track.”

That the world’s most popular pop band could explore such varying and digressive ideas in one album signalled the possibilities involved in letting loose rather than keeping an album to one strict idea, be it thematic or melodic. Songs like “Doctor Robert” and “Got to Get You Into My Life” seemed like the natural progression from Rubber Soul, but paired next to such strange and singular songs as “I’m Only Sleeping” and even “Yellow Submarine,” Revolver showed what the Beatles could really do when someone loosened the reigns a little. “We were really starting to find ourselves in the studio,” Starr said of their recording sessions, according to biographer Bob Spitz.

Even though McCartney’s “For No One” feels closer to the typical pop structure the Beatles had followed up to Revolver, it too is an exercise in meditation a la “Tomorrow Never Knows.” At two minutes, it’s the briefest of thoughts with a French horn serving as the harmony John and George would’ve normally provided. Their absence allows McCartney to weave his narrative, but he isn’t concerned with an ending. “And in her eyes, you see nothing/ No sign of love behind the tears, cried for no one/ A love that should have lasted years,” he sings before the horn ends the song. It would make more sense to include an ellipses at the end of his last line, because the fade away is so sudden. There is no grand finale, no punctuative moment that marks its finish. The song merely ends before a silent beat stars the next track and listeners are on to “Doctor Robert.”

For Beatles fans across the globe, “What’s your favourite album?” serves as the ultimate litmus test. No matter the answer, Revolver can’t be ignored, even if, like me, your appreciation for it started off far differently than  it did for a Beatles fan in 1966. It changed the game quite literally for the Beatles and for pop music, and continues to resonate to this day, gaining new fans every year, myself included.

Perhaps if my second grade teacher had played “Taxman” or “Tomorrow Never Knows” (the latter probably would have gotten her in trouble), I wouldn’t have been drawn in at such an early age. And maybe that’s the genius of “Yellow Submarine”: it was an invitation to children, then and now, to enter a world that they would love for the rest of their lives.

Voormann’s history with the Beatles dates to Hamburg, and later living with George Harrison and Ringo Starr in the band’s flat after Lennon and McCartney moved out to be with their ladies.. Voormann who divided his time between graphic arts and playing bass, provided Manfred Mann with a bottom in in the late ’60s, worked as a session musician for Lou Reed, James Taylor and others, and on the Beatles’ Lennon, Harrison and Starr’s solo work. As a graphic artist, he designed a host of album covers for a variety of artists and was enlisted by Lennon to create the cover for the Beatles’ 1966 classic “Revolver.” This is one of the many variations before the final version evolved. His black and white collage style was the perfect complement to the Beatles‘ zany style at the time. Voormann left a lasting mark on the graphic arts and is still busy as he approaches 82. Most people who know his work will forever associate him with his classic “Revolver,” album design.

In the long spectrum of the Beatles’ work, Revolver serves as the dividing line. It marked the boundary between the light-hearted fare that helped the band rise to worldwide fame, and the more serious song writing and experimentation that would define the latter half of their career. Released on August 5th, 1966 in the UK (with the U.S. release following three days later), Revolver signified a meditative moment that would not only change the face of pop music, but continues to impact listeners as powerfully as it did upon its arrival 50 years ago.

The Beatles
John Lennon – lead, acoustic and rhythm guitars, lead, harmony and backing vocals, piano, Hammond organ and harmonium, tape loops and sound effects, cowbell, tambourine, maracas, handclaps, finger snaps
Paul McCartney – lead, acoustic and bass guitars, lead, harmony and backing vocals, piano, clavichord, tape loops, sound effects, handclaps, finger snaps
George Harrison – lead, acoustic and rhythm guitars, bass, lead, harmony and backing vocals, sitar, tamboura, sound effects, maracas, tambourine, handclaps, finger snaps
Ringo Starr – drums, tambourine, maracas, handclaps, finger snaps, lead vocals on “Yellow Submarine”

The-Beatles-Revolver back

Track Listing:

Side one
1. “Taxman” (Harrison)
2. “Eleanor Rigby”
3. “I’m Only Sleeping”
4. “Love You To” (Harrison)
5. “Here, There and Everywhere”
6. “Yellow Submarine”
7. “She Said She Said”

Side two
1. “Good Day Sunshine”
2. “And Your Bird Can Sing”
3. “For No One”
4. “Doctor Robert”
5. “I Want to Tell You” (Harrison)
6. “Got to Get You into My Life”
7. “Tomorrow Never Knows”

Bitch Falcon; a name you won’t forget and a band who won’t let you forget them. This trio from the vibrant, much-hyped music scene of Dublin was formed by front-woman Lizzie Fitzpatrick with her friends in a small kitchen in the city in 2014. Since these freshman days, the line-up has galvanised around the rhythm section of Barry O’Sullivan on Bass and Nigel Kenny on Drums, Here’s some behind the scenes footage of the making of Gaslight. It was shot in Dublin over the course of a very quick day at Mill Studio, Dublin 8.

Dublin alt-rock trio Bitch Falcon exploded onto the Irish music scene in 2014. They quickly established themselves on the live circuit through the intensity of their performances, with the snarling vocals and pulsating riffs of lead singer and guitarist Lizzie Fitzpatrick announcing a new sound in Irish rock. Hard-hitting debut single ‘Wolfstooth’ encapsulated the raw energy of their live shows and brought the band to a wider national audience. During 2015 and 2016 Bitch Falcon’s evolving sound fused together the strongest elements of rock, grunge, metal, hardcore and melodic electro-pop. Follow-up singles ‘Syncope’, ‘TMJ’, ‘Clutch’ and ‘Of Heart’ registered this development and garnered increasing critical acclaim for the band in Ireland and the UK.

Bitch Falcon have honed the frenzy of their live show over the past few years, completing several headline Irish tours along with performing at all the major Irish festivals including Electric Picnic, Other Voices, Body&Soul, Castlepalooza, and Sea Sessions. The trio have shared the stage with an impressive array of international acts including Fucked Up, Torche, Girl Band, Sleeping With Sirens, The ZZZ’s, Glen Hansard, Fontaines D.C. and Les Butcherettes. Their increasing popularity meanwhile has seen them begin to make an impact in North America, with the band recently packing rooms in Toronto, Montreal and Los Angeles but it is the UK that has developed a serious appetite for the band. They have travelled the length and breadth of the country and most recently have begun their assault on UK festivals such as The Great Escape, Y Not, Teddy Rocks and 2000 Trees.

Releases November 4th, 2020
Band members:
Vox/Guitar – Lizzie Fitzpatrick Bass –  Drums – Nigel Kenny

It’s been a while. We are very happy to announce that our 3rd LP It’s Never Going To Happen And This Is Why will be released on Hallow’s Eve Eve, via our new DARK HABITS imprint. It will have been three and a half years since “Condition” and it really has felt a lot longer…but let’s save all that for another time and cut to the chase. Spectres return with ‘It’s Never Going To Happen And This Is Why’, their bluntest, most bludgeoning LP yet. The oft sprawling and trance-inducing explorations of feedback and terror featured on their previous two critically acclaimed albums ‘Dying’ (2015) and ‘Condition’ (2017) have been supplanted by a rifle chamber of condensed noise nuggets firing in at three minutes or less. Spectres have gone pop.

Recorded by Alex Greaves at The Nave, a 19th century Methodist church in Leeds, and released on their own new Dark Habits imprint in Europe / Little Cloud Records in the USA, the mischievously titled album sees Spectres at their most radical and playful, splattered with guest spots from experimental artists Klein, Elvin Brandhi, Ben Vince and French Margot.

The video for the initial taster, An Annihilation Of The Self, can be seen from 10am on Friday by clicking on the still below.

The video is a collaboration between Joe and Adrian from the band. Joe in the fix of his own Blair Witch and Adrian bringing the words to illustrative strife with inimitably grim effect.

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Slightly indulgent but something we have been wanting to do for a while. A square 12″ wooden box that will contain a test pressing of the album, all artwork from the album as a 12″ printed booklet, a copy of Dark Habits zine, signed one off original artwork and a few surprise extras plus hand painted lid. We’ll be hand building these so expect a few exciting defects, and they may well come nailed shut, like a real coffin. Limited to 10.

 

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Long-time misery botherer and harbinger of melancholy Josienne Clarke brings you a new collection of rare early demos and song-writing sketches. It contains fragments and songs previously unreleased and entirely unheard by ears other than Josienne’s, alongside some early originals of well-known Clarke Classics.

A real collector’s collection, or “the contents of a folder that should have gone directly into a f**king skip” as the artist herself explains. “It’s the audio sketchbook for most of the stuff I’ve ever made. I record song ideas and sketch arrangement/production ideas, either sung in or attempted on the instruments I have to hand, before showing them to anyone. If I’m selling these off, then things have got pretty bad or I’ve gone f**king mental.”

Spanning the many years of her career, it starts with a recovered low-grade recording of the artist aged 3 doing an early cover version then wends its way non-chronologically through the various years’ releases and unreleased compositions in a double volume of 53 tiny songs at a total running time of 85 minutes.

Tracks such as ‘i never learned french – original demo’ expose the roots of Josienne’s production ideas and choices, such as the hummed string lines and mouth trumpet solo, that would later appear re-packaged on the 2015 release ‘Nothing Can Bring Back The Hour’. A treasure-trove of original ideas, a burgeoning song-writing talent, brimming with Clarke’s irrepressible originality.

This is the artist alone in her bedroom-studio-office, it’s where the magic lives, the bits you don’t normally get to hear, that first spark of an idea as it appears, complete with missteps and mistakes and the frisson with which such creativity is charged. It hisses and crackles with pure, imperfect, creative endeavour, the nearest you’ll get to seeing how it’s really done. Take a peak over the fourth wall, behind the stage curtain, way beyond the dressing room and into her home to take a seat with a view over her shoulder as she pens some of the finest songs in her catalogue, a catalogue which is among the finest original song-writing this country has to offer.

“It is a candid and exhausted documentation of a whole life spent in song and how utterly, beautifully pointless that is.” says Josienne.

The cover of Historical Record Vol 1 & 2 was designed by photographer & videographer Alec Bowman, using a photograph taken of Josienne in 2009 during a shoot for her debut album ‘One Light Is Gone’. Alec explains “Josienne is almost lost in a fog of digital degradation, but not quite; she’s standing, still, defiant in the face of all the noise. I used a hex editor to violate the integrity of the file & create the impression of a slow data collapse out of which Josienne appears, a quiet ghost in a static roar.’

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Historical Record vol. 1 & 2 will be released on Corduroy Punk Records on 15th May 2020. It will only be available as a digital download & only on Bandcamp. “It will not be available on any streaming services, I’m sick of other people making more money from my creative endeavour than I do…”

All songs written, composed, arranged & recorded by Josienne Clarke
Vocals – Guitar – Recorders – Clarinet – Josienne Clarke

Released May 15th, 2020

One of the nicest collector’s albums of recent months comes from Tulsa, the second largest city in the American state of Oklahoma. At the beginning of February 2020, the idea arose to bring about twenty musicians from Tulsa and the surrounding area together in the “Paradise Studio” in Grand Lake, Oklahoma. That studio was owned for decades by the musician and songwriter Leon Russell, who died in November 2016, who had frequented almost all music genres such as pop, country, rock, gospel, bluegrass, R&B and blues during his own musical career of 60 years. other artists had produced.

However, in that “Paradise Studio” where Leon Russell, Bob Seger and Freddie King had recorded their success albums, no record had been recorded since 1978. But the legendary studio has been lovingly maintained and honoured for the last thirty years by Rick Huskey, a true Tulsaan who has always recognized the historical value of the music building. songs that got a new lease of life included “If The Shoe Fits” by Leon Russell brought here by John Fullbright, “I Yike It” from ‘The Gap Band’ covered by Charlie Redd & Briana Wright, in addition to “ Rock’n’Roll Gypsies ”from ‘Gypsy Trips’ and “Tulsa County” from Jesse Ed Davis of which Jesse Aycock brings two beautiful cover versions. Also the song “Blind Man” from “The Great Divide” from their 2001 released album “Dirt And Spirit” gets a very nice new look here adapted by Dustin Pittsley.

“Back to Paradise: A Tulsa Tribute to Okie Music” is due out 28th August via Horton Records. The sprawling collection gathers some of the finest music written by Tulsa musicians, ranging from JJ Cale to the Gap Band and Leon Russell. Oklahoma musicians John Fullbright, Jesse Aycock, and several others gathered at Leon Russell’s now-defunct Paradise Studio in Grand Lake, Oklahoma, to track material over four days in early 2020. The result is a deeply memorable, often soulful examination of the music that made the place.

John Fullbright’s take on Russell’s “If The Shoe Fits” is deeply funny and a fitting tribute to a man who pioneered a sound and a scene. “I think it’s funny, tongue-in-cheek,” says Fullbright. “The handful of us have done this long enough to get a kick out of the song.”

Jesse Aycock had made a super cool playlist called “Oklahomage”, recognizing some of his favourite Oklahoma-connected songs. He noted that there are a number of fantastic Oklahoma-connected songs that are not on streaming platforms. 10 of these 17 tracks on the Back to Paradise: A Tulsa Tribute to Okie Music album.

John Fullbright – “If The Shoe Fits (Leon Russell)” from the album . This song was written by Leon Russell. Released in 1972 on the album Carney on Shelter Records. “Carney” was partly recorded at Paradise Studios, Grand Lake of the Cherokees, Tia Juana, Oklahoma. The song is included in director Les Blank’s Leon Russell documentary, A Poem Is A Naked Person, and seemed to be a perfect fit for inclusion on this album.

In February 2020, a group of Tulsa musicians travelled to Leon Russell’s famed Paradise Studio at Grand Lake to record the first album tracked there since 1978. Tulsan Rick Huskey has spent the last 30 years preserving and restoring the space, honouring its history while preparing for a new chapter. The narrow, winding road one must travel to reach the compound provided time for reflection.

John R. Fullbright – acoustic guitar/vocals, Paul Benjaman – guitar, Jesse Aycock – lap steel/pedal steel, Paddy Ryan – drums, Aaron Boehler – bass. Video by Jeremy Charles and FireThief Productions. Shot in Tulsa, OK, including footage at Mercury Lounge Tulsa. Thanks to Dylan Golden Aycock for the space and vehicles and Hideaway Pizza for the hospitality.

Some of the biggest names in the history of music travelled the same path years before. That realization was both inspiring and daunting. Entering the studio for the first time, the musicians were awestruck. Decades later, the vibe is still alive. Seventeen tracks were recorded over the course of four days – mostly live, with very few overdubs. While there was a core group of players throughout the session, a grand total of 20 Tulsa musicians participated in the recording. The Oklahoma songs were chosen for the album represent the famous to the obscure, and everything in-between. This recording honours those who came before and made it possible for Tulsa musicians to have an identity and a music scene today. Thank you to Leon for blazing a trail and building this lake palace. Thank you to all of the Oklahoma musicians over the years who have been role models through their authenticity and spirit of community. This record is dedicated to them. Back To Paradise: A Tulsa Tribute to Okie Music.

This song was written by JJ Cale and was originally released in 1979 on the album “5” on Shelter Records. “5” was the first album to feature Cale’s wife, Christine Lakeland. Eric Clapton also recorded this song on his album “Backless”. The definition of cool, Cale is one of the most influential Tulsa musicians to have ever lived. His music continues to inspire musicians and fans alike.

Paul Benjaman“I’ll Make Love To You Anytime (JJ Cale)” – Official Video from the album Back To Paradise: A Tulsa Tribute to Okie Music. Release date 08.28.20 on Horton Records. Paul Benjaman – guitar/vocals, Jesse Aycock – guitar/lap steel, Paddy Ryan – drums, Aaron Boehler – bass.

Release date 08.28.20 on Horton Records

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“I’m prepared to tell everybody everything.” This statement from Cub Sport frontman and songwriter Tim Nelson, so clear-eyed and headstrong in its intent, is at the heart of the beloved Brisbane four-piece’s new album. “Like Nirvana”, is the band’s fourth record, embraces every side of Nelson: the angelic lightness as wellas the multiplicitious, haunted darkness. It recasts them and their bandmatesmulti-instrumentalists Zoe Davis, Sam Netterfield, and Dan Puusaarias fearless innovators, experimentalists willing to blow up everything about the Cub Sport of old in order to create this dazzling and daring new chapter.

Described by Nelson as more of a holistic release from Cub Sport in contrast to their largely linearearly records, This is a glistening, tightly-woven exploration of religious reckoning, oppressive structures of masculinity, and feelings of inadequacy. Dovetailing with a shift in Nelson’s gender expression they now identify as ‘free’, and use both neutral and male pronouns the record is impressionistic and abstract, pushing aside the brightly coloured realism of 2019’s self-titled record in favour of gauzy lucid dreams. Nelson’s embrace of raw emotion has pushed them and their bandmates, to create a record more fiercely emotive than ever.

The wonderful new Cub Sport video for their latest single ‘Be Your Man’ is an absolute must watch. Inspired by reigning queen Kate Bush’s ‘Wuthering Heights’, the ‘Be Your Man’ visual is dramatic and beautiful, a middle finger to any binary societal norms about what it is to ‘be a man’. If you liked what you heard in ‘Be Your Man’ then fear not, as the band have a whole bag of new tracks for you, in what we like to call an album. ‘Like Nirvana’ came out at the end of last month and is, in the words of NME ‘their most stunning album yet’.

“Be Your Man” is taken from our fourth album “Like Nirvana”, out July 24th.