Archive for the ‘MUSIC’ Category

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Melbourne singer Anna Cordell plays tender yet deceptively complex folk music that belies a
childhood spent her childhood learning the piano, guitar and musical theory. Her voice is rich and warm yet lyrically her music is filled with angst and conflict, a emotional impact heightened by her penchant for the minor key.

Next month will see the Melbourne based artist Anna Cordell release her long awaited and much anticipated debut album “Nobody Knows Us”. Having shared its first two singles, the subtle drama of ‘You’ and the spiritual title track late last year, she now shares the earnest and vexed third, ‘Tried So Hard’. Musically, a delicate underlying drift carries the song’s slow burning dynamic forward tracing both its contemplative subject matter and Cordell’s intimate and emotively inflected vocal as it oscillates between the breathily philosophical to the angelically quizzical. She explains the meaning behind of the track thus;

“It’s (about) asking for love in the face of different ways of seeing the world, a song that grapples with the insecurities so many of us have in understanding our capacity to love and be loved.”

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As far as debut album’s go, Nobody Knows Us comes via rather unconventional means. It’s one where Cordell’s lived experiences and long, albeit fragmented, symbiotic relationship with music palpably shines. Few artists releasing their debut album would have a backstory that involved quitting music for a decade, having and raising five children, and forging out a career and successful boutique label in another artistic endeavour — fashion design. At the same time, few artists could end up making a debut this thematically mature and delicately nuanced with such an un-guardedly honest self awareness.

Listen to ‘Tried so Hard’ will be self released on February 14th. the forthcoming album, ‘Nobody Knows Us’, 

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The first line-up announcement for End of The Road 2020! Pixies, King Krule, Angel Olsen, Big Thief, Bright Eyes + loads more.

Featured Track: “Alec Eiffel” by Pixies. Written by Charles Thompson,

Desolation Angels (40th Anniversary)

In the late summer of 1978, Bad Company’s Paul Rodgers, Mick Ralphs, Simon Kirke and Boz Burrell spent several weeks recording songs for the British supergroup’s fifth studio album at Ridge Farm Studio in Surrey, England. “Desolation Angels” – recording their fifth album named after Jack Kerouac’s 1965 novel – was released in March 1979, and became a double-platinum hit, peaking at #3 on the U.S. album charts.

The 1979 album features the single ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Fantasy’ and the new deluxe edition features the 2019 remaster (used for The Swan Song Years box set) along with a bonus disc of previously unreleased versions of album tracks and outtakes.

The collection introduced fan favorites like “Evil Wind” and “Rhythm Machine” and spawned two singles: “Gone, Gone, Gone” and “Rock ’n’ Roll Fantasy,” which took radio by storm and became the best-selling single of the band’s career. The new double-disc “Desolation Angels”: 40th Anniversary Edition boasts 19 unreleased songs taken from the album’s recording sessions, including versions of seven album tracks as well as outtakes “Smokin’ 45” and “Rock Fever.”

THOM YORKE – ” Anima “

Posted: January 19, 2020 in MUSIC

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It shouldn’t surprise anyone that “Anima” is a somewhat abstract, perhaps alienating on some level, but dynamically amazing exercise.

This album is a sea of electronic beats swirling at your ears and yet, “Last I Heard (…He was Circling the Drain)” almost sounds like a morose classical piece with laser-gun whooshes added for effect. “Traffic” is thick with dense, fast drums. It almost works in moody “drum’n’bass” framework. “Dawn Chorus” is some stunning, near spoken-word. “Not the News” sounds like something Four Tet might put on a record, whereas the bass-driven “Impossible Knots” may be the most accessible moment on the record. Really, this album sets a high bar because it captures such a specific mood with the sound it achieves. Twenty years and change from “OK Computer,” and Yorke is still living in the dystopian, resigned mechanical future that “Fitter Happier” promised.

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Soccer Mommy is announcing her sophomore album and follow-up to 2018’s groundbreaking “Clean”. “Color Theory” will arrive February 28th via Loma Vista Recordings, and along with the previously shared “Yellow Is The Color Of Her Eyes,” we’re getting a sunny new track today called “Circle The Drain.” 

Where “Yellow” was defined by overcast reverb, the sound of longing on “Circle The Drain.” feels more playfully nostalgic. “I wanted the experience of listening to Color Theory to feel like finding a dusty old cassette tape that has become messed up over time, because that’s what this album is: an expression of all the things that have slowly degraded me personally,” Allison shared in a press release. “The production warps, the guitar solos occasionally glitch, the melodies can be poppy and deceptively cheerful. To me, it sounds like the music of my childhood distressed and, in some instances, decaying.”

“Circle the Drain” arrives with a video brandishing a dusty-old-cassette aesthetic courtesy of director Atiba Jefferson (you may know him as a character in the Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater universe—or, you know, as a professional photographer).

“Color Theory” is out February 28 on Loma Vista.

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Magnolia Electric Co’s ‘Trials & Errors’ was released 15 years ago today on January 18th, 2005. A live album originally recorded in April 2003 at Club Ancienne Belgique in Brussels, the record is the first to bear the Magnolia Electric Co moniker despite the band having been touring as Songs: Ohia over that period, and was met with comparisons to the live recordings of Neil Young & Crazy Horse.

Recorded only a few months after they had formed, “Trials & Errors” captures Jason Molina’s new band Magnolia Electric Co. on one magical night in Brussels in 2003. It is a scintillating audio document of one of America’s most important contemporary live acts evolving into something really special and doing what it does best – whipping an audience into a frenzy. This set captures Molina & Co right after Molina had retired the Songs: Ohia machine in favor of this powerful new vision of his.

Two years in the planning process, the new project took its name from the last Songs: Ohia full-length album. Composed of a nucleus of four members, this particular show captures the newly christened band on its first tour in its earliest state. Still a four-piece with Pete Schreiner providing the back beat drum pulse, Mike Kapinus on bass and melancholic trumpet, and the two Jason’s dueling over guitar solo space: Molina’s down-tuned guitar matching his now settled tenor voice, and Groth’s Creedence-channeling rhythm guitar and solos filling out the upper register. With Molina as the principal songwriter, the songs are as classic as his fans have come to expect over the course of seven Songs: Ohia full-lengths (all released between ’96 and ’03). With his new band, however, fans can finally enjoy a stable & more-than-able rhythm section that just gets tougher and tougher with each performance. Like a juggernaut that simply chews up everything in its path, on Trials & Errors, the new Magnolia grinds through three old Molina favorites (two from Songs: Ohia’s Didn’t It Rain and one from the Songs: Ohia album Magnolia Electric Co), three songs which will be released on the upcoming Magnolia Electric Co studio album (out Spring 2005) as well as four songs that will only exist on record in their live form as presented here.

Fans may recognize that Trials & Errors comes peppered with an homage or two to Neil Young. One could, in fact, argue that the album is an existential response to Tonight’s the Night. While from the songwriting perspective Molina is often pegged as the perennial downer, this is not, like Young’s, a record born out of a series of sudden tragedies, but rather out of a whole life of growing up & out in the Midwest, surrounded by a small town mentality in a wide open space. The bastard second of three children, the Midwest is a funny place, often patted on the head and doled out placations of “Oh that’s nice – now go run along while the East & West do their business.” It is an album about finally accepting one’s place in this world; about standing ground and owning up to it with confidence. These are familiar themes that run through some of the greatest literary works of our last great century. Join Magnolia Electric Co as they play their part in a long-standing tradition of touring musical artists (Lynyrd Skynyrd, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Bruce Springsteen & the E-Street Band) that capture the spirit of their own homes, traditions and principles and communicate those through the chooglin’ rock of ages on stage for rooms full of empassioned audiences 150 nights a year. This is all about that wandering spirit, and the longing to wrangle it into place every now & again.

In subsequent tours, this core line-up would soon shift to find Mark Rice (the Impossible Shapes, John Wilkes Booze) replace Schreiner on drums, with Schreiner (the Panoply Academy, Scout Niblett, the Coke Dares) moving to bass guitar, and Kapinus (Okkervil River sideman) shifting to keyboards/piano & trumpet while Groth (the Impossible Shapes, John Wilkes Booze, the Coke Dares) and Molina remain constant on guitar.

Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce the release of a newly re-mastered and expanded 50th anniversary edition of the first solo album by the legendary Peter Green.

Peter’s work with Fleetwood Mac needs no introduction. His acclaimed guitar playing and writing graced several albums and a succession of hit singles before he departed the group in 1970. He embarked on the recording of his first solo album only a month after leaving Fleetwood Mac,

The End of the Game would be an entirely instrumental affair, quite different in feel from Green’s work with Fleetwood Mac. Released to very little fanfare, unjustly so as it was an imaginative work with Green’s instantly recog-nisable guitar playing. “The End Of The Game” and it was as much a departure from “The Green Manalishi” as that same track had been from the rest of Fleetwood Mac’s entire output. Through three tracks per side, Green pursued a far looser strand of improvisational rock comprised of wholly instrumental outings that were entirely un-bluesy, extemporaneous free rock borne on the wings of Green’s guitar with its expansive tone evoking the loosest of feels, often drenched with emotional wah-wah pedal use of hair triggered sensitivity. The rhythm section of Bluesbreaker and ex-Anysley Dunbar Retaliation bassist Alex Dmochowski and Geoffrey Maclean on percussion allow Green all the room to explore through distended lines of fragile but strongly poetic counterpoint as the addition of twin keyboardists Zoot Money (grand piano) and future Hot Tuna keyboardist Nick Buck (organ, electric piano) sporadically appear only to colour in a clutch of fine points which Green has left wide open as he is in a constant state of unhurried transit and always onto the next subtly-turned phrase.

The album rises up to a slow fade and into the raucous nine minute wah-wah led jam of “Bottoms Up.” As the title suggests, it’s carried along by a heavy bass line that sallies forth unswervingly to provide Green with a woody and thriving backdrop to begin the odyssey of successive circular wah-wah guitar configurations. Electric piano lines twinkle and fall like stars once Green lets up to recollect before another sweet and extensive wah-wah outpouring and the band is solidly back to stabilise Green’s ever-migrating wah-wah guitar textures. “Timeless Time” passes by silently like a gentle current under the land bridge that links the two jamming continents of side one together. The elongated “Descending Scale” opens with jumpy off-beats of piano clusters and busy though sensitively played drums like a send up of a jazzbo warm up until Green throws the whole discordant array into a high pitched wah-wah crescendo that reverberates into another unresolved conclusion that soon all but quietly slips away but for the accompanying half-erased instrumentation.

Side two begins with “Burnt Foot” and Dmochowski’s over-recorded, punctuation bass pummeling over the taking care of bizniz jazz drums that cascade all around Green’s riffing quietly traipsing in the background until it breaks down into a drum solo of sizzling cymbals with no drum skin spared from a multitude of lightning quick flourishes. Dmochowski’s bass returns to erratically shift gear into a gritty jam with Green’s churning wah-wah fanning out into a 359 degree arc of groove before its premature breakdown and subsequent fade. “Hidden Depth” opens with strategically played and watery-echoed wah-wah, with the returning piano and organ choppy in the intro and then straightening out with interplaying tones as emotions and riffs that suggest the breaking of a new dawn. Nick Buck’s organ colourations take on the same role of melancholy as Rick Wright’s from “Mudmen” or Tom Constanten’s emerging springtime renewal in “Quadlibet For Tenderfeet” off side one of “Anthem Of The Sun.” And all the while, Green’s restrained guitar of reversed pick-ups rings out truly unheard of tones with a natural delight for spaciousness and innuendo. All is peaceful until broken by a quick cut into the screeching wah-wah opening of the title track, ”The End Of The Game” which closes the album aggressively hectic and free form — loosely strung together not by rhythms but phrasing and a requited, unspoken understanding between the players.

The following year saw the release of a single ‘Heavy Heart’ b/w ‘No Way Out’, which received some airplay and saw Green perform ‘Heavy Heart’ on Top of the Pops. A collaboration with Nigel Watson followed early in 1972 for Green’s final single for Reprise Records, ‘Beasts of Burden’ b/w ‘Uganda Woman’.

This new and expanded Esoteric Recordings edition has been newly remastered from the original Reprise master tapes, features four bonus tracks (drawn from the two non-album singles) which appear on CD for the first time. It also features a booklet with new essay and an exclusive interview with Zoot Money on the making of the album.

Pinegrove

This month the New Jersey alt-country outfit Pinegrove will share “Marigold”, the group’s debut on their new label, Rough Trade Records, and the announcement arrived with a single and video for one of its tracks, “Phase.” “Phase” feels like a return to the Pinegrove’ former sound on their acclaimed record, Cardinal. In it, there’s a driving drum beat and palm-muted guitar setting the stage for frontman Evan Stephens Hall’s ardent yelps. The restrained verse builds to a chorus where everything comes to a crescendo at Hall’s cry of “I’m torn right through / Divided right in two.” There’s some fantastic slide guitar fills within, giving the track Pinegrove’s signature almost-country feeling. Pinegrove took a year-long hiatus after Hall issued a statement in response to an allegation of “sexual coercion” made against him in 2017. Since then, their self-release of Skylight in 2018 and new record deal with Rough Trade have shown the group attempting to put those events behind them.

Taken from Pinegrove’s new album ‘Marigold’, coming January 17, 2020 on Rough Trade Records.

AGNES OBEL – ” Myopia “

Posted: January 18, 2020 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Danish singer-songwriter Agnes Obel specialises in otherworldly folk, the kind best suited to solo journeys and hours spent alone, creating a fort and shutting the curtains. It’s apt, then, that her next album should be titled ‘Myopia’, meaning nearsightedness. “The albums I’ve worked on have all required that I build a bubble of some kind, in which everything becomes about the album,” she says.“I need to create my own myopia to make music,” Obel adds of an album that sees the avant-folk performer experimenting with obscure instrumentation (cello pizzicato, celesta, luthéal piano) and different production techniques.

“For me ‘Myopia’ is an album about trust and doubt. Can you trust yourself or not? Can you trust your own judgments? Can you trust that you will do the right thing? Can you trust your instincts and what you are feeling? Or are your feelings skewed?”

Although Obel’s music can often curate a monologue of modern-day dystopian-esque news stories that we are all now subject to, the contents of Island Of Doom are much more personal, as she explains: “The song is made up of pitched-down piano and cello pizzicato and vocals, all choirs are pitched down and up… In my experience when someone close to you dies it is simply impossible to comprehend that you can’t ever talk to them or reach them somehow ever again. They are in many ways still alive because in your consciousness nothing has changed, they’re still there with everyone else you know.”

Agnes Obel’s single ‘Island Of Doom’ taken from her album ‘Myopia’. the new album now ahead of it’s release on February 21st 2020

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The post-punk legends Wire announced a new album, “Mind Hive”, and shared its first single, “Cactused.” They also announced some tour dates. Mind Hive is due out January 24th, 2020 via the band’s own pinkflag label.

Mind Hive is the band’s seventeenth studio album and the follow-up to 2017’s Silver/Lead. Wire’s line-up consists of founding members Colin Newman (vocals/guitar), Robert Grey (drums), and Graham Lewis (bass guitar, vocals), as well as guitarist Matthew Simms, who has been with the band since 2010.

Wire exhibit little inclination to look back – rather they remain resolutely focused on producing music which is smart, vital and defiantly modern.

“Mind Hive” is the group’s first newly recorded material since 2017’s “Silver/Lead”. that album garnered rave reviews and career best sales. yet, if “Silver/Lead” set the bar pretty high, “Mind Hive” seems to have no problem vaulting over it. be like them is a super-angular composition, utilizing a recently rediscovered Wire lyric from 1977. Colin Newman and Matthew Simms’ guitars constantly mesh and diverge, whilst the rhythm section ensures the song prowls forward with an unstoppable menace. cactused is the first of Mind Hive’s pop moments. the vocal is wide eyed and wired, with effects-heavy guitar work creating a bright web of noise, with the song’s stop/start moments providing a series of precise energy bursts. primed and ready rides out on a tightly pulsing synth sequence punctuated by icy slivers of guitar.

This is Wire at their most compressed yet propulsive. “Off the Beach” is another prime pop song. with its breezy, optimistic melody, and blend of electric and acoustic guitars, the song initially sees the group seemingly celebrating the joys of everyday life but things are destined to turn a shade stranger. unrepentant explores the kind of bucolic soundscape early Floyd would have been proud to call their own. boasting one of the album’s finest texts, the song radiates out into a shimmering sonic heat haze. “Shadows” pulls the classic Wire trick of placing a dark and cruel lyric in a musical setting of tender beauty. never has the recounting of atrocity been so seductively pitched. “Oklahoma” is the muscular and dramatic joker in the pack. Lewis’ dark vocal swims through a rich compound of guitar textures and synth tones, building into a masterclass of tension and release. hung is the album’s centrepiece. this 8-minute excursion matches a brief but evocative lyric with a dense, mesmeric guitar grind. Simms and Newman’s keyboards add a plaintive note, as the song moves through a series of sections, each with its own distinct atmosphere. humming is a beatless autumnal drift fashioned from delicate keyboard textures and rich soaring guitar tones. Newman delivers a state of the world lyric with a touching sense of innocence, whilst the piece ends with Lewis’ husky baritone listing locations and their difficult associations. an elegiac end to a supremely confident album. Mind Hive arrives at a time when wire are being cited as an influence by yet another generation of bands. a career spanning feature documentary called people in a film is due for release late 2020. quite how a group that has been operating for such a long period is still able to produce such exciting and essential work is difficult to understand. and yet here we are

“MIND HIVE” – release date 24.01.20