Ola's Kool Kitchen 362

Ola’s Kool Kitchen is a show on KCLA 99.3 FM in Los Angeles, 107.5 andhow.FM, Rock Velvet Radio, Maximum Threshold Radio, Rock Radio UK, Sword Radio UK, Jammerstream One, Kor Radio, Firebrand Radio , Bombshell Radio and Hank’s Alternative Radio and you can hear more shows here https://hearthis.at/olaskoolkitchen/
Show 362

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1. The Apples in Stereo-Signal in The Sky
2. Say Sue Me-Old Town
3. Cuesta Loeb – Out Of
4. Hollow Hand-Blackberry Wine
5. Carter Vail – Melatonin
6. The Lords of Altamont- I Said Hey
7. Cruel Summer -Skyless- Typical Girls Volume Four LP-Emotional Response
8. The Beat Escape-Moon In Aquarius-Life Is Short, The Answer’s Long-Bella Union
9. Mama Kokomo – Primavera Feel-single-self release
10. The Chocolate Watchband-Are You Gonna Be There (At the Love-In)-Single-Tower
11. Blue Magoos-Tobacco Road- Psychedelic Lollipop-Mercury Records
12. Connie Clark-My Sugar Baby-single-Joker Records
13. Ben Howard-There’s Your Man-Noonday Dream-Island

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Ryan Adams has raised the hopes of the vast majority of his fan base, by teasing the release of a number of past projects, including his famously unreleased album, Blackhole.

Just a week after Ryan Adams tried his hand at reporting the weather thanks to a US television station, the musician took to Twitter today to test the waters in regards to the release of some of his long-awaited projects.

“I wrote this album. I have 17 new songs,” Adams wrote on Twitter, alongside an image of his debut solo album, Heartbreaker. “I have 4 records on a shelf. Does anyone want to hear Prisoner 2 & 3, Black Hole? Live at Capitol Theater w The Infamous Stringdusters, Exile on Main Street cover live & rehearsals ?”

He continued: “I’m just asking to see if maybe I’m crazy & no one does.” The two live albums he mentioned in the message referred to a show recorded in Port Chester, New York in July 2016 with The Infamous Stringdusters, and his Rolling Stones tribute from New Orleans Jazz Fest last month respectively.

“I’m just asking to see if maybe I’m crazy & no one does.”

This is a lot of unreleased material, but let’s start taking a look at what’s on offer.

As it stands, Ryan Adams’ last album, Prisoner, was released in 2017, becoming his most successful record to date, . While a new album would already be brilliant, a sequel (or two) to the record would definitely be well received by his fans. However, it’s not quite clear whether his “17 new songs” constitute what he calls to be Prisoner 2 & 3 or if is a totally different project altogether.

One of the live projects mentioned by Adams is his performance at The Capitol Theater with The Infamous Stringdusters back in 2016. This performance is rather famous among his fans for the hugely collaborative nature of the performance, in addition to featuring covers of Slayer’s ‘South Of Heaven’ and Black Sabbath’s ‘The Wizard’.

Likewise, the most recent of these live records is that of Adams’ recent Exile On Main Street concert, which saw him cover The Rolling Stones’ legendary album (almost) in full just last month.

In March, Adams said he had 11 new tracks recorded from sessions in his Pax-Am Studios. “Records are funny creatures sometimes,” he tweeted. “They wake you up like they can’t wait to just get born.”

Featuring the likes of Todd Wisenbaker on guitar, Cyril Neville of the Neville Brothers on percussion, Medeski Martin & Wood’s John Medeski on piano, and Don Was on bass duties, a professionally recorded version of this gig (and its rehearsal) would indeed be a massive addition to any record collection.

However, the most important of these potentially-forthcoming albums has to be that of Blackhole, an album supposedly recorded sometime last decade during the final stages of Adams’ severe drug addiction.

“There’s two versions of that record,” Adams explained in 2014 while considering releasing the album for Record Store Day. “There’s one where the vocals and the performances are really fucked-up.”

“Then there’s a second version, which was the last thing I did when I was still messed up. Bits and pieces of that had to be stitched together to make the final product like a patchwork quilt, because some of its vocal takes are too fucked-up to release. But it’s really cool and the end result made me very happy.”

While the record was never released for Record Store Day 2015, Adams stated that he was still unsure as to how he should release the record, and which version should see the light of day. We might not know what sort of plans he up his sleeve for this legendary unheard record, but we’d be keen to receive in any way he wishes to give it to us.

At this stage, it seems fans are pretty keen to hear all these unreleased projects, so hold tight, because you might have a lot of Ryan Adams coming your way soon!

Picture yourself in front of your record collection, deciding which one you’ll listen to next. You finally choose Kilimanjaro by Teardrop Explodes; you haven’t listened to it for a long time. In that moment, you notice that your partner placed your Face to Face copy in an incorrect slot. It goes with you to the record player too. A few minutes later, you corroborate that both Cope and Davies made prevailing, lucid and brilliant records. And you dream thinking how would they sound together, in an hypotetic alloy that feels almost impossible straight away. There are only fourteen years away from one record to
the other, but they seem made in different centuries, different planets. We find the answer at the Electric Duck studios in San Francisco, Kelley Stoltz’s base of operations. A Detroit-native, Kelley was an adolescent moved by post-punk and English new-age, and became an adult falling in love with the extensive pop legacy from the 60s.

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Both references define one of the strongest, most talented
discographies of the last years. Filtering and tying those sounds together with freshness and distinction is what makes Kelley an unique composer. Stoltz gets ostentation and histrionics out of the best 80s pop and supplies it with outstanding melodies and sense of humour. What Brian Wilson doing a cover by Wire’s The 15th would feel like.

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Limited to 500 Copies (250 on Yellow and 250 on Red). Allie Hanlon’s Peach Kelli Pop returns after 2 years with a 6 song EP. In December 2017, Hanlon spent a week in her hometown of Ottawa, Canada. She recorded the EP in just four days, utilizing the dust-coated equipment left in her bedroom after she emigrated to the United States in 2013. “I really benefited from being in the specific home, and even room where I learned to play music when I was growing. Upon first listen, a new level of vulnerability is instantly detectable, effectively separating this release from any of the bands previous creations. This new intimacy is due to the predominantly autobiographical lyrics: songs about isolation, depression and feeling like an outsider in Hanlon’s current home of Los Angeles. Which Witch is akin to the Red Cross’ Posh Boy EP – both have 6 songs, each close to a minute long.

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All 4 members of Peach Kelli Pop are outspoken Redd Kross fans; which comes as no surprise: the band is named after a Redd Kross song. On earlier material, Hanlon’s voice was passive, frequently inaudible and blanketed in reverb. Those days are gone; She now sings with confidence and clarity, demonstrating a refreshing assertiveness not seen before in her work. Which Witch holds the first glimpse of an evolution, a new stage in which Hanlon is finally no longer holding back.

When you’ve got riffs like these and a voice like hers, you’re pretty much golden. The riffs in question are the spindly, expansive, geometrically unusual building blocks of Forth Wanderers’ sound, arching guitar architecture that turns the band’s big Sub Pop spotlight moment into a monument. The voice belongs to Ava Trilling, who applies her deadpan soprano to lyrics like, “He says he likes my taste/ But I bite his tongue, you know, just in case.” Consider them Built To Spill built for 2018 indie rock, trading awestruck twee visions for frank ruminations on the politics of collegiate social life.

Forth Wanderers employ a tin-can-telephone style of composition which they use even when living in the same area code. Since first collaborating in 2013 as Montclair, New Jersey high schoolers, guitarist and songwriter Ben Guterl and vocalist Ava Trilling have passed songs back and forth like pen pals. Guterl will devise an instrumental skeleton before sending it to vocalist Ava Trilling who pens the lyrics based off the melody. The duo then gather alongside guitarist Duke Greene, bassist Noah Schifrin, and drummer Zach Lorelli to expand upon the demo. It’s a patient and practiced writing system that has carried the quintet through two EPs (2013’s Mahogany and 2016’s Slop) and one LP (2014’s Tough Love). Forth Wanderers, the group’s sophomore record and Sub Pop Records debut, is the group’s most comprehensive and assured statement yet.

Now living in Ohio and New York respectively, Guterl and Trilling have evolved their separate but collaborative writing process. “The only way I can really write is by myself in my room with a notebook, listening to the song over and over again,” Trilling says. “I’ve never sat down to write a story, I write the song as it unfolds.” Since her lyrics are often embedded with intimate truths from her life, the private writing experience often leads to intense self-reflection.

On Forth Wanderers these introspections include meditations on relationships, discovery, and finding oneself adrift. Despite the inherent heaviness of those themes, Forth Wanderers feels joyous, a rock record bursting with heart. Take “Not for Me,” a romping track about “the ambivalence of love.” Trilling’s confession of “I can’t feel the earth beneath my feet/Flowers bloom but not for me” resists feeling like a dreary, pitying complaint; instead, as her bandmates bolster her melancholy with interlocking harmonic intricacies, she soars with self-actualization. Opener “Nevermine,” is a surge of confidence inspired by an ex-lover who is still captivated by her image. “I don’t think I know who you are anymore/And I think I knew who I was before,” she jabs with relish. On “Ages Ago” Trilling paints the image of a constantly-shifting enigmatic lover. “I wasn’t sure who they were, they changed constantly (hence the metaphor describing the “grey coat” and cutting their hair just to “stay afloat”),” she says. “I wasn’t going to wait any longer to find out.”

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Recorded over five days by friend and audio engineer Cameron Konner at his Philadelphia home studio, Forth Wanderers amplifies the heartfelt sentiments of their earlier works into massive anthems. Guterl and Greene’s guitars have never sounded sharper, Schifrin and Lorelli’s terse rhythm section is restless, and Trilling sounds more self-assured than ever. These are exuberant, profound songs driven by tightly bound melodies and a loving attention to detail.

Released April 27th, 2018

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Formed in New Brunswick, NJ in 2005, Screaming Females are Marissa Paternoster (guitar, vox), Mike Abbate (bass), and Jarrett Dougherty (drums). Over six albums and more than a decade of music making, the band has remained deeply individual and steadfastly DIY. They have also grown into one of the most dynamic and devastating touring bands going today.

Marissa Paternoster’s voice is the relentless force and central instrument that drives Screaming Females’ All At Once. Her howling vibrato doesn’t necessarily outshine the fired-up shredding or evocative lyricism. Rather, it makes those elements feel that much grander. The expression “I’ll make you sorry” never sounded as sly and, frankly, believable as it does coming out of Paternoster’s mouth. A sense of restless intensity translates stylistically, too. All At Once is a feverish rock n’ roll album, pieced together with power-pop grooves, punk progressions, indie-rock melodies, and even a hint of ska. But as ever, Paternoster is the star. When she sings, “The sun destroys me,” on “Agnes Martin,” it doesn’t sound hyperbolic; it sounds as if she’s on the verge of melting.

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Out February 23rd, All At Once, is the trio’s most expansive and imaginative work to date — a double LP that swings between surreal miniatures and and solo-heavy sprawl. Concision takes a backseat to experimentation, with arrangements meant to evoke the energy and spontaneity of their live shows. It’s music built across a timeline that’s longer than our internet-enhanced moment typically tolerates and a testament to the band’s dedication and perseverance.

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Songwriter Katy Davidson they/them revived the band Dear Nora in January 2017 when Orindal Records reissued the thirteen-year-old album Mountain Rock on vinyl. The reissue received great acclaim and the band toured the west and east coasts last year. Spurred by the momentum, Davidson decided to create the first album of new Dear Nora material in a decade, Skulls Example.

Katy explains:  I wrote the songs on Skulls Example between 2009 and 2017, and recorded most of them during the latter half of 2017. “Skulls Example” is a name I once chose for myself during a party by closing my eyes and picking two words at random from a book of magic.

I tracked most of the basic instruments for each song with my bandmates Zach Burba (bass/synth), Greg Campanile (drums), and Jessica Jones (guitar) at a studio in Portland, Oregon. We used nice microphones, ran audio into a Mackie mixer, then ran stereo audio out of the mixer to a Tascam 4-track cassette recorder. Then I bounced the individual instrument tracks from cassette to Ableton Live on my laptop. Zach overdubbed a lot of the bass and synth tracks remotely from his house in Seattle. I tracked all the vocals and recorded some guitar overdubs in a reverberant empty bedroom  in my house in Portland. Engineer Tim Shrout expertly mixed the album on ProTools while I micromanaged.

It has been a decade since I have released new material under the name Dear Nora. The last time I released an album of new material was in 2011 – that was called California Lite and it was under the band name Key Losers. Thematically, California Lite makes sense as an early warm-up to Skulls Example. It’s about freeways, the internet, human connections (and broken connections), and wilderness.

Skulls Example is about how our weird, techno-futuristic present (VR, self-driving cars, drones, Tinder dates, reality TV show government, Starbucks ubiquity, iPhone as extension of human body, Blade Runner -esque income inequality, cryptocurrency “utopias”, etc.) juxtaposes so absurdly against the never-ending backdrop of inexorable, ancient elements (fire, ice, wind, storms, mountains, rocks, human instinct, etc) . It’s like we live in multiple realities at once: Now Reality layered upon Ancient Reality, Virtual Reality layered upon Now Reality. The palimpsest creates the illusion of collapsed time.

The album is specifically about humanity. Our capacities and feats are so incredible – we’re godlike – and yet we’re scrounging for happiness and basic survival, we’re heavily addicted, we just want love, we want family. We’re simultaneously so brilliant and so basic. To me, this feels like the worst and best time to be alive. I experience some level of horror and bliss on a daily basis.

One of the reasons I “retired” Dear Nora ten years ago was because I couldn’t figure out how to navigate financial stability as a full-time songwriter and touring musician. And for the last three years, I’ve worked as a commercial music producer. I enjoy my work, but I constantly think about how I’m contributing to the Massive Capitalistic Garbage Dump of Life. When Trump got elected, I knew it was time to make a new album.

I derived a ton of lyrical inspiration from several recent visits to Oaxaca and Mexico City. I’m fairly obsessed with Mexico’s culture, music, and attitude towards death. I also derived inspiration from the Mojave desert and Oregon’s high desert, places where there are creosote or juniper trees, and fields of ancient lava rock. To me there’s nothing like letting go of my thoughts and being in the dusty, sensual wilderness. Living on Earth feels like pure magic to me and I tried to bring that feeling to this album. .

Released May 25th, 2018

All songs written by Katy Davidson between 2009-2017
The song “Skulls Example” was co-written by Zach Burba

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In a hotel room near midnight, Phoebe Bridgers shares a lullaby for the lost. You can’t help but hang on for dear life. Phoebe Bridgers was one of our top discoveries going into Austin’s SXSW, a quiet and powerful voice in the loud din of the festival. After she performed at Central Presbyterian Church, a favorite venue,  Bridgers and percussionist Marshall Vore came to NPR host Bob Boilen’s hotel room just before midnight to play the striking song “Smoke Signals.” Stripped of the strings on the studio version, there is still a sweeping quality to this acoustic performance, something like Low’s elegiac waltzes blurred into open chords, suitcase percussion, children’s toy bells and vocal harmony. You can’t help but hang on for dear life.

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Juanita Stein, the Howling Bells front woman turned solo artist, releases her second taster and brand new single, Easy Street, It’s taken from her upcoming second album, Until The Lights Fade, which will be released by Nude Records on 31st August.

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Juanita Stein, from the band Howling Bells turned solo artist, and her first single release, Forgiver came out on 13th April. . The single was co-written and produced by Brandon Flowers while Juanita was on tour with The Killers in Northern Europe this February.
Forgiver was the first taster of Stein’s upcoming second album, Until The Lights Fade, which will be released by Nude Records on 31st August. I’m excited to share the music with you, recorded over a couple weeks at Big Orange Studios in Austin, Texas, each song tells a different story.

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