The 40 Best Yo La Tengo Songs

With the release of the band’s 15th album, There’s a Riot Going On, last week, the time was right to reappraise the trio’s discography  There’s a Riot Going On is a good one, but so far none of its songs have jumped off to become my absolute favorites. That’d be a tall order for any band.

And if you’re somehow wondering who these Yo La Tengo guys are in the first place, well, they’re a Alt rock band—and a really good rock band. The husband-wife team of guitarist Ira Kaplan and drummer Georgia Hubley started the band in Hoboken in 1984, and released four albums with a variety of partners and sidemen and on a handful of labels before incorporating bassist James McNew on the 1992 full-length May I Sing With Me. The next year they released their breakout record Painful on Matador, a partnership that endures to this day.  Painful is where their “disparate influences congealed into a fully formed style of the band’s own, from early ‘60s folk and pop to the post-Velvets diaspora of noise and punk,” and that’s still a good summation. They’re about as likely to play a three-minute pop gem as they are a forlorn folk song, a 10-minute one-note drone, a cover of a classic hit from the ‘70s, or a crazed, 20-minute noise jam. And they do it all with the same level of proficiency, confidence and humility. Again, but they’re are a really good rock band,


All song were original recorded by © Yo La Tengo , except “The Whole of The Law”(by The Only Ones and re recorded by YLT)

Discography, Albums

Ride the Tiger (1986)
New Wave Hot Dogs (1987)
President Yo La Tengo (1989)
Fakebook (1990)
May I Sing with Me (1992)
Painful (1993)
Electr-O-Pura (1995)
Genius + Love = Yo La Tengo (with Jad Fair e Daniel Johnston) (1996)
I Can Hear the Heart Beating as One (1997)
And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out (2000)
The Sounds of the Sounds of Science (2002)
Summer Sun (2003)
Prisoners of Love: A Smattering of Scintillating Senescent Songs: 1985-2003 (2004)
Yo La Tengo is Murdering the Classics (2006)
I’m Not Afraid Of You And I Will Beat Your Ass (2006)
Popular Songs (2009)
Fade (2013)


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Danish post-punk band Iceage have shared another new track from the band’s forthcoming  fourth studio album  Beyondless, due out on May 4th via Matador Records.

“Take It All” is the third single from their new album and it follows the release of “Catch It” and “Pain Killer,” the latter of which featured guest vocals from Sky Ferreira.
“Catch It” was the band’s first single since their 2013 album Plowing Into The Field of Love,

Their brand new single, “Take It All,” features marching drums, twinkling yet murky guitars and frontman Elias Bender Rønnenfelt mourning the state of the planet (“the world is a crime”) before becoming distracted and utterly mesmerized by the beauty of another human. Rønnenfelt sings as he is reluctantly entranced, “And men were dying for the death of the west / Oh yeah / And the last thing I ever wanted to see was these brand new sparkles / Coming from your ever loving God damned eyes.”

A statement described the sound and themes from the band’s new album, Beyondless:

The intoxication is consistent, this has always been drunk music, but it’s less a stumbling confusion and more a sturdy heartfelt confession with each record. They have finally caught up with their ambition. Their entire charm has always rested in their running ahead of themselves with blind confidence, taunting you to follow and you follow because wherever they are going is vital, is alive; on Beyondless they are treading with an assurance that is disarming, but there is no loss of charm, you are arm in arm now, whispering intimacies.


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Surfer Rosa is one of those perfect debut albums, that lets you know what you’re in for right out of the gate. The blueprint for the album, and for so much of the guitar-based music that followed over the next decade or so, is set within the first minute of the lead track, “Bone Machine.” David Lovering’s spare yet ferocious drums, the sound of them so vast that you wonder if he’s actually playing an oil rig. Kim Deal’s muscular, melodic bassline, underpinning but never overstepping. Joey Santiago drawing blood out of a few crystal-sharp notes of guitar. Black Francis (aka Frank Black) yelping for sixteen bars of agitated verse over a relative lull of music before Santiago yanks the song back into a chorus of blistered lips and “uh-oh!”—the first instance of the loud/soft motif that the band further refine and recalibrate through another dozen frenetic and thrilling songs, most of which combust around the two-minute mark.

The Pixies made Surfer Rosa not long after their formation in Boston, Massachusetts, and just a few weeks after the release of their debut mini album, Come On Pilgrim. Both releases were themselves culled from a March ’87 demo, The Purple Tape, which included embryonic versions of several Surfer Rosa songs: “Break My Body,” “I’m Amazed” and the album’s most straightforwardly hardcore moment, “Broken Face.” At the urging of their British label, 4AD Records, Surfer Rosa saw the Pixies replace Purple Tape producer Gary Smith with a relatively unknown recording engineer, Steve Albini, who was best known at the time for his work with his own band, Big Black. After a get-to-know-you dinner at Lovering’s place, the band and Albini set to work on the record at the newly opened Q Division Studios in Somerville, a few miles north of Boston, which had ironically been recommended to them by the ousted Smith.

Famously opposed to both the title “producer” and the concept of receiving royalties on albums he worked on, Albini was paid a flat fee of $1,500 for his ten days of work on the album, out of a total recording budget of $10,000. He would be similarly forthright in his critiques of the band’s performances, alternately hailing them as “genius” or dismissing them entirely.

In press interviews at the time, the band would characterize Albini as a “brainiac” who loved lo-fi and instruction manuals but had little enthusiasm for “anything human-sounding”—the result of which meant that those ten days of recording were spent honing guitar and drum sounds, with vocal parts left until the very last evening. Special effects were eschewed in favor of an abrasive, unadorned—and soon to be much copied style that found its perfect foil in the Pixies’ deceptively delicate (and often delicately played) songs. Even overdubbing was generally avoided. “He hates overdubs,” Deal had told Melody Maker.

Though the two would later on form a deep friendship (as evidenced by their joint panel at this year’s SXSW festival), Deal was somewhat dismissive of Albini’s methodology in subsequent interviews. But Albini always had a fan in Black Francis. “I like him because he likes loud,” he exclaimed in the same interview. “All the needles were on red. He totally overloaded the tape.”

Assistant engineer John Lupner, meanwhile, was struck by the lengths Albini went to authentically capture the particular sound of Q Division Studios. Not everything was quite so meticulously planned, however. According to John Murphy—Deal’s husband at the time—the abrupt end to “Where Is My Mind?” came about by accident, as a result of the tape running out while the band was playing. “The tape started to go click click click,” he told Frank and Ganz, “and they went, ‘Well, we got most of it.

If there’s an overarching theme to Surfer Rosa, it’s a Lynchian scratching away at the underbelly of modern life to reveal tales of voyeurism, incest, and other deviant behavior. Francis put these preoccupations—that include a rather ahead-of-its-time portrayal, in “Bone Machine,” of a pedophile priest (or “preachy-preach” in Pixies vernacular)—down to his “real hardcore Pentecostal” upbringing. It’s not all about molestation, though. Two songs (“Broken Body” and “Tony’s Theme”) reference superheroes, while several others draw on a six-month period Francis spent as an exchange student in Puerto Rico the inspiration for both the Spanglish lyrics in “Vamos” and “Where Is My Mind?” with its dreamy evocation of snorkeling “in the Car-ibb-e-an.”

Though vocals were left until the final day of recording, they were by no means an afterthought. Indeed, the interplay between the band’s two vocalists, Francis and Deal, would become another Pixies trademark. In keeping with his vérité style, Albini abandoned studio trickery in favor of natural acoustics. Deal’s two most memorable vocal performances—her lead on the bouncing, pop-toned single, “Gigantic” and the oo-oohs that run throughout “Where Is My Mind?”—were recorded in the bathroom, its natural echo proving preferable, as far as Albini was concerned, to any available studio effect. The latter song’s false start jarring and seemingly throwaway on first listen is instructive as to the attention to detail from both band and engineer. Deal’s first ooh, which precedes Francis’s curt instruction to “Stop,” has a sharp rawness to it. When her voice returns in the song proper, it’s engulfed in an underwater haze much more befitting the lyrical reverie.

There are further spoken interjections elsewhere: some within the songs, such as the aforementioned opening to “Bone Machine” and Deal’s similar announcement that “Tony’s Theme” is about “a superhero named Tony,” and some in between. “I’m Amazed” begins with Deal mid-sentence, gossiping about a teacher who’s “into field-hockey players.” “Oh My Golly!” ends with Francis yelling “You fuckin’ die!” at her. He goes on to clarify that he’d done so in jest, in response to her warning that no one mess with her equipment.

Surfer Rosa was released in March 1988 in the UK and remained available only as an import in the United States until late summer, when 4AD signed a North American distribution deal with Rough Trade. Initial U.S. pressings paired the album with Come On Pilgrim. The two works were then reissued separately in 1992, after Elektra Records took on the 4AD catalogue.

Having received largely positive press notices, Surfer Rosa sold solidly in the interim, if unspectacularly—perhaps in part because, like so many landmark albums, it found itself a little far ahead of the curve. Winning the hearts and minds of college radio and Melody Maker (which named the album the best of 1988) would not yet yield widespread success. The album did not go gold in the U.S. until 2005, by which time the Pixies had disbanded, lain dormant for a decade, and then reunited for the first of several deservedly lucrative world tours.

By then, of course, Surfer Rosa had been well and truly canonized as one of the most influential albums of its time, with Nirvana and myriad others taking the Rosa model and running with it, many of them queuing up both to sing its praises and to summon Steve Albini to work his magic to record his own band’s album In Utero . Kurt Cobain listed it as his second favorite album of all time (after Iggy and the Stooges’ Raw Power)

Among the earliest advocates for the band, meanwhile, was one of rock’s greatest statesmen, David Bowie, who would later lament, “I thought it was a hell of a shame that America didn’t recognize its own with the Pixies.” His 2002 album Heathen includes a well-judged cover of Rosa’s “Cactus,” a short and sweet ballad about a prisoner so desperate for something—anything from his wife that he ends up begging her to smear her dress with blood and “send it to meeee.”

Another important step in the album’s elevation came a few years earlier, with David Fincher’s clever use of “Where Is My Mind?” in a pivotal scene toward the end of Fight Club. Since then, that song in particular has become so inescapable that you’ll even hear gentle piano renditions in HBO prestige dramas. Surfer Rosa regularly appears on all-time “best-of” lists online and in print.

  • Black Francis – vocals, rhythm guitar, acoustic guitar
  • Kim Deal – bass, backing vocals, vocals on “Gigantic” (credited as Mrs. John Murphy)
  • Joey Santiago – lead guitar
  • David Lovering – drums

Lewis CapaldiNo automatic alt text available.

Lewis‘ first ever physical release of the critically acclaimed “Bloom EP”.Clear vinyl & scented inner sleeve.Lewis has decided to release a physical version due to popular fan demand and to support independent record shops.

The songwriter hails from the Scottish town of Bathgate, and made an enormous impressive with debut cut ‘Bruises’. Since then his profile has exploded, with the Scottish artist set to play a sold out 600 capacity show in Glasgow shortly.

The new EP contains four tracks, recorded at various locations on both sides of the Atlantic during Lewis’ explosive rise. “I’m over the moon to be finally putting out a full EP,” he explains. “It’s a collection of songs that captures the last year of my life, and features songs I recorded in London, New York and Los Angeles. Songs Fade & Mercy were recorded only a few months ago so they’re almost as fresh to me as anybody else listening.”

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Devotion is a stunning artistic about-face from revered Melbourne songwriter Laura Jean. Loved for her piercing, intimate, folk-based albums such as 2014’s Laura Jean and 2011’s A fool who’ll, Laura has worked with producer John Lee (Beaches, Lost Animal) to create an enveloping, deep pop album like nothing she has done before.
Laura’s last self-titled album, recorded in the UK with John Parish (Perfume Genius, Aldous Harding, PJ Harvey) and featuring Jenny Hval on backing vocals, was a critical smash in Australia, shortlisted for the Australian Music Prize and nominated for two Age Music Victoria Awards.
The album lead to Australian and New Zealand tours with Aldous Harding and Marlon Williams, plus shows with Julianna Barwick, Jessica Pratt and more.
But soon Laura found herself tinkering with a 90s Kawai keyboard, enjoying its built-in drum rhythms and moody synth sounds. Laura began a series of shows performing with nothing but the keyboard, as the idea for her next album grew and developed.
Devotion is an album about teenage obsession, coastal child- hood and vivid memory – universal themes filtered through Laura’s razor sharp lyrical focus. Initial influences for the record took in R’n’B, 80s adult contemporary pop and 70s disco, but the end result is transformed into something wholly other, full of depth, resonance and mystery.
Played entirely by Laura, John Lee and drummer Dave Williams (Augie March), “Devotion” is both contemporary and timeless. 


About the album, Laura says: “Devotion is about how a lonely coastal childhood filters into a contemporary adult life built hundreds of miles away. I wrote this album for my mum, middle sister and myself as we were at that time – eccentric, romantically-unfulfilled teens and a stressed out single mum trying to have a love life. In those times we needed to hear songs that were loving and uplifting, about the reality of intimacy, longing, romantic risk and reward. The album is narrated by me in the present, a detached adult figure far away from home, but still driven by an inner fantasy world that is set on the beach where I grew up.”

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Scottish Fiction Records are proud to present ‘a talent for being unreasonable’ – the debut album from Glasgow indie pop four piece Wojtek the Bear.

Following on from the success of their maiden EP, Wojtek the Bear tucked themselves away to work with in-demand producer Chris McCrory (Catholic Action) to record ‘a talent for being unreasonable’ at Shady Lane Studios in late 2017. The album opens with the pointedly percussive ‘oil & water’; a delicate introductory track. Second track, ‘the navies of landlocked nations’, metaphorically depicts close-to-home struggles against a gentle indie-pop backdrop. After the traditionalist tendencies of ‘postcode’ and the American Football-esque guitar/snare coupling of ‘kindness doesn’t cost’, the album crests at ‘waves’, a beautifully unassuming track. This kind of engaging simplicity is a skill normally found in bands far older then Wojtek the Bear, yet they deliver in spades.


The midriff of the album boasts the energetic injection of lead single ‘made out of maps’, before we are happily dragged back to the stripped-down ‘call this a war’; perhaps the record’s purest form of simplicity. effort contrasts a slacker-pop surface with a lyrical performance which questions the laid-back vibes the music

Releases May 25th, 2018

victorious festival

Victorious Festival are thrilled to announce that the legendary Brian Wilson will be joining their 2018 event along with The Sleaford Mods, The Cribs, Dub Pistolsand more!
Illuminating the 60s with an infectious blend of pop, psychedelia & tight harmonies, Brian Wilson directed the Beach Boys away from generic surf stalemate to the soaring pop/rock masterpiece that is Pet Sounds – a pivotal moment in pop history. His greatest hits set at Victorious will be unmissable!

Post-electro-punk agitators Sleaford Mods will be on hand this summer to administer a large dose of social commentary while The Cribs will be returning to Victorious celebrating 16 years of infectious critically acclaimed indie rock.
Also joining the spectacular line-up are dub-hop pioneers Dub Pistols, feted indie four-piece Stereo Honey, the calypso-tinged Cassia, indie-rockers Bang Bang Romeo, Electric Pyramid, Catherine McGrath, Fenne Lilly and Nathan Ball.

Image  —  Posted: March 22, 2018 in FESTIVALS, MUSIC
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DEVO: The Brand / DEVO: Unmasked


The art-punk pioneers Devo have today announced that they will be releasing a brand new book set which looks to chronicle the band’s influences, inspirations and in turn the huge amount of influence and inspiration their output has given.

The two book set, featuring ‘The Brand’ and ‘Unmasked’, will use archival art, prints, photography and notes to re-tell the story of the band, put together by co-founders Gerald V. Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh.

A unique 2-in-1, 300+ page, never-ending book with rubberized covers: flip it over when finished and begin again!

With ‘Brand’ we see a closer look at the band’s relationship with the mdeia and in turn their fans, while ‘Unmasked’ takes a in-depth look at the band on a more personal level, as their individual narratives meander through the group. The set is available in the Classic version, which features both books in a mammoth 320-page edition. The book will also be available in the limited run Signature edition, which contains the two separate volumes completed by a hand-crafted, rubberized clamshell box signed by the band, and a vintage Devo artwork co-created by Casale and Mothersbaugh.

DEVO: The Brand is illustrated throughout with classic Devo iconography and photos showing how DEVO Inc. was built.
DEVO: Unmasked, is packed with rare and unseen photos of the band from childhood, through to the present day. First-person commentary is provided throughout by Jerry and Mark.

The Signature edition box set: limited print run of separate books encased in a hand-made rubberized clamshell box, numbered and signed by DEVO, includes a large, exclusive print of a collaborative work of art by Mark and Jerry.

DEVO was, and is, an adjective, an adverb, a noun, a Gestalt–a unified field concept embracing art, music, politics and fashion with an alternate world view we christened ‘Devolution’. For the first time ever, this book compiles the breadth and depth of our attempts to create something unique against all odds, while fighting the good fight as the world slowly proved that Devolution is real.

Gerald Casale

Record Store Day 2018, The Alarm  “Where The Two Rivers Meet”

Saturday April 21st is World Record Store Day and also the day for the release of brand new music from Mike Peters and The Alarm.

Mike Peters and The Alarm will be releasing a very special, limited edition 8 track – vinyl only – mini album entitled Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play which will only be available exclusively at participating Record Store Day outlets worldwide.

To celebrate the release, Mike Peters will undertake a 24 Hour Transatlantic Tour performing at Record Stores in the U.K., New York and Los Angeles – all within the same day.

Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play features an incredible collaboration with The Cult / Coloursøund guitarist – Billy Duffy on the brand new song Blood Red Viral Black. There are 8 songs in total including a brand new recording / mix of live favourite Two Rivers coupled with Transatlantic, The White Count and Year One which runs at 8.55 minutes in length, making it the longest song in Alarm history (Only three of the eight tracks will appear on the forthcoming album). The original artwork was conceived by Mike Peters and Daniel Shearn and features a spot varnish cover image with full colour inner sleeve.

Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play features an ‘electric’ and ‘acoustic’ side and is the prelude to a brand new album release scheduled for June 29th 2018.

The complete track listing of Where The Two Rivers Meet Extended Play is as follows:

Electric Side
Two Rivers
Blood Red Viral Black
The White Count

Acoustic Side
Thirteen Dead Reindeer [Acoustic]
Armageddon In The Morning [Acoustic]
Crowd Trouble [Acoustic]
Year One

#rsd #thealarm

Arcade Fire have announced a reissue of their debut Arcade Fire EP. It’s the first time that the EP has been pressed to vinyl. The Arcade Fire reissue arrives on Record Store Day 2018 (Saturday, April 21) via Legacy Recordings. The band self-released Arcade Fire in 2003. Two years later, Merge Records re-released it on CD. The seven-track release includes “No Cars Go,” which was re-recorded for 2007’s Neon Bible.

This 2003 album preceded the instant classic Funeral, and has been relatively overlooked since Arcade Fire became one of the biggest bands in the world. However, the seven track EP (known unofficially as Us Kids Know) gives an insight into the band’s thematic and musical heart and is a key part of any fan’s collection. Now on vinyl for the first time in transparent blue, limited and numbered.
1. Old Flame  2. I’m Sleeping In A Submarine 3. No Cars Go  4. The Woodland National Anthem 5. My Heart Is An Apple  6. Headlights Look Like Diamonds 7. Vampire / Forest Fire

First time on Vinyl for this 12″ transparent Blue coloured & individually numbered EP, with augmented Gold artwork