Official Movie Trailer for the new Neil Young Film – ‘Mountaintop’ IN THEATERS ACROSS NORTH AMERICA ON OCTOBER 22, 2019 AND IN EUROPE AND SOUTH AMERICA ON NOVEMBER 18TH.

The documentary goes behind the scenes of the making of ‘Colarado’, Young’s first album in seven years with Crazy Horse. Earlier this year, the singer-songwriter announced that he would be postponing the rest of his 2019 tour plans to focus on completing 15 unfinished film projects.

One of those films was a ‘making of’ documentary that was filmed to tie into the release of ‘Colarado’, which will be Crazy Horse’s first new album since 2012’s ‘Psychedelic Pill’, and according to Young, the record will stand up to some of his previous classics albums.

“We believe we have a great Crazy Horse record and one to stand alongside ‘Everybody Knows This is Nowhere’, ‘Rust Never Sleeps’, ‘Psychedelic Pill’ and all the others,” he said back in April.

Neil Young first revealed Crazy Horse’s return to the studio in April. He announced ‘Colorado’ would arrive in October, and feature “10 new songs ranging from around 3 minutes to over 13 minutes.” Besides CD and digital versions of the record, there will also be a double vinyl release comprising three sides of music and a 7” exclusive single not on the album.

Following songs ‘Rainbow of Colors’ and ‘Milky Way’, Neil Young and Crazy Horse released a short instrumental called ‘A letter from us’ last month.

Advertisements

Chastity’s second full-length record, “Home Made Satan”, is a more barbed direction for Whitby, Canada-native Brandon Williams. It’s an emotional and political concept record, the 2nd instalment of a building trilogy, from the perspective of a young man who’s spent too much time alone, allowing paranoia to drown out the reality of the outside world. It’s an album about fear, an intense meditation on youth, suburban life and extremism in a sinking Western World.

Williams, who produces all his own music, created something with a strong cinematic nature, a record that sounds somewhere between My Chemical Romance and The Smiths (even as he cites Morrissey’s alignment with the UK’s far-right as the complete opposite of his own political view). Recorded in a small studio in London, Ontario, with his full live band in the few weeks between a European tour with Fucked Up and a seven-week North American tour, Williams crafted Home Made Satan like he was producing a film—his bandmates were the cast members, his engineer the cinematographer, and Williams the writer. “It’s visual,” he says. “I’m scoring this picture I have, and trying to get it as close to people’s ears as it is in my mind.”

The new songs are gothier and hookier than ever, recalling ‘80s goth staples like The Cure. Home Made Satan’s got more eyeshadow than 2018’s acclaimed shoegaze-meets-hardcore Death Lust, and it’s got pop sensibility for days. Williams has toned down the reverb, too, on the new record, with an emphasis on vocals and lyrics. Home Made Satan, with its lines about commies and masochism and the evangelical right, is meant to sing along to.

And when you do, you’ll mostly be singing about America’s fall. About hyper alienation and xenophobia, the people’s struggle for happiness, those without access to community who become afraid and more alone. “It feels like America’s constantly coming undone at its seams,” Williams says, “and it’s falling apart on its most vulnerable people first.” He’s jumped more into politics on this record, with an intent to represent those often unrepresented.

Through songs like “Flames”—a gauzy, hook-heavy, tongue-in-cheek tune that draws a line between sexual fetishism and the fetish of the “American dream,” and parallels bleak emotion with bleak economy—and “Last Year’s Lust,” a melancholy track about the dark thoughts we get when we’re alone for too long (“Today, I stay home / I make sure I’m not going to hell”), Williams sings the song of those trying to survive on their own.

Home Made Satan is acutely political, but it’s also romantic. “The Klan still meet in London, you should come,” goes the song “Spirit Meet Up” a fraught-sounding standout about a Bonnie and Clyde-style affair. “I’ll bring my weapons / Unmask ‘em, skin ‘em, cut ‘em

http://

/ Watch them run, organs bleeding, falling, dying.” The young man is out to fight for what he believes, battling hate and discovering critical thought of his own (“With a full stomach and another plate to eat / You say commie like it’s a bad thing,” he sings.) The violence, Williams explains, is done with the belief that it will “net good” for the world at large. As the record moves on, “Sun Poisoning” is about the melancholy that often comes with the vulnerability of a new relationship, feeling happy and sad at the same time, “Do you want to see / How easily my teeth bleed?” Williams sings, “Do you really want to see / If you can make me happy?”

On “The Girls I Know Don’t Think So,” which Williams refined with the help of his bassist Julia Noel, he sticks up for the concerns outside of his own lived experience. Here, the young man finds his heart. He ridicules men who harass women, men who say “no need for hostility,” when there is a long list of reasons to be hostile. “Dead Relatives” is a mournful song in which the young man bemoans traditional American values and stews at home, hoping for the day of radical reform to come— “There’s a special place in hell for the Christian right,” Williams sings, “Bury your parents tonight.”

With Home Made Satan, Williams chooses a side. And that side is with youth on the fringe, those in the struggle, and the far-left. With this record, Chastity rises as a young voice for revolutionary thought, action and song.

released September 13th, 2019

Kim Gordon Delivers Ferocious Solo Debut <i>No Home Record</i>

Kim Gordon doesn’t put much stock in the superlatives that have piled up around her over the years: pioneer, visionary, icon, legend, beacon. “Being referred to as an ‘icon,’ blah blah blah,” she said recently in the New York Times. “What does that even mean?”

Fair enough, but you’d be forgiven for thinking she’s earned it. As a visual artist, co-founder of Sonic Youth, fashion designer and occasional actor, Gordon has been a magnetic, and inscrutable, focal point of indie cool for nearly 40 years. In all that time, her musical pursuits have come in group projects: 15 studio albums with Sonic Youth, three each as part of Free Kitten and Body/Head and one with Glitterbust, along with various EPs and singles scattered among them. Now, at the age of 66, Gordon steps out with No Home Record, a ferocious solo debut. It’s jagged, chaotic and mesmerizing in a way that pulls you inevitably into the thick of it, as if the songs were exerting their own inescapable gravity.

Though Gordon delivers these nine songs with supreme, unruffled confidence, there’s an unsettledness to them that reflects the sense of impermanence she has felt since moving back to Los Angeles, that most transient of cities. On “Air BnB,” the feeling manifests in the lyrics of her sardonic ode to the gig economy. She lists off amenities you might find in the web copy—something about towels, a flat-screen TV, a daybed—over gnashing guitars that sputter and grind before dropping into gear on the refrain as she wails, “Air BnB, gonna set me free.”

There’s a form of abnegation happening on “Murdered Out,” which Gordon first released as a single in 2016. She noticed that the low-rider car-culture trend of matte-black paint jobs was becoming more widely fashionable. The embrace of light-absorbing finishes struck her as “the supreme inward look, a culture collapsing in on itself, the outsider as an unwilling participant as the ‘it’ look,” she explained. Gordon pursues that idea in the lyrics, her voice alternating between breathless and abrupt on the verse and formidable full-throated keening on the refrain, accompanied by a massive, relentless beat from Warpaint drummer Stella Mozgawa and snakey blasts of guitar that writhe and churn. The overall effect is at once imposing and enthralling.

Gordon tinkers throughout with rhythms, intoning short, incisive lyrical phrases over a hypnotic mechanical beat on “Cookie Butter,” and letting the electro-clash drums on “Sketch Artist” drop out here and there for free-form interludes. Toward the end of No Home Record, she skips the beat altogether on “Earthquake,” singing in dusky tones over drifting guitars, crescendos of cymbal wash and some crumbly electronic noise in the background. It’s the most straightforward song on the album, but instead of ending there, Gordon takes one more foray into mercurial weirdness on album closer “Get Yr Life Back.” Her voice is often little more than a disquieting whisper surrounded by an eerie clanking rhythm and thickets of guitar feedback and brittle noise that blanket the song like some sinister fog.

Gengahr release their much anticipated return with their third full- length album, “Sanctuary”, via Liberator Music (part of The Mushroom Group).

More expansive and ambitious than ever before, Sanctuary is the experimental alt-pop band’s finest body of work to date, a DIY triumph which welcomes old friend Jack Steadman of Bombay Bicycle Club as producer, adding his distinct brand of symphonic sparkle to Gengahr’s complex, layered sound and pushing the band further into all-out pop territory than they’d ever dared stray before.

Recorded at the brand new Propagation House way out in Bude in Cornwall, the album also recaptures the magic that old school friends Felix Bushe, John Victor, Hugh Schulte and Danny Ward felt when they were making their debut. With mixing from the hugely in-demand Nathan Boddy (James Blake, Nilufer Yanya, Shame), additional production from John Victor and engineering from A Dream Outside’s engineer James Bragg, Sanctuary is vibrant, intoxicating, intimate and alive; the product of friends having a good time and seizing control of their own destiny.

The band said :We are overjoyed to let you know that our new album ‘Sanctuary’ is released on 31st January 2020 and includes our new single ‘Everything & More’ which is available now. We are so happy to be back!

The album was produced by our pal Jack Steadman from Bombay Bicycle Club and we are so proud of what we have created together.

Alongside shows already announced, we’re also going on tour next year in the UK,

Image may contain: 4 people, hat and closeup

Wives debut LP, “So Removed”, opens with the timely and befitting lyrics: “Happy ever after / this place is a disaster.” According to Jay Beach, the vocalist, guitarist and primary songwriter of the four-piece Wives, this is the track that best embodies their sound. It’s Drone-y, crammed with clever observations, and still catchy enough to make you forget the world is ending despite being told straight to your face. “Waving Past Nirvana” embraces my favorite sentence in the band’s bio, which describes the sentiment of their debut as “tethered to daily anxiety without resorting to cynicism.”

Wives’ creation story plays out much like their sound: a confident teetering and self-assured stumbling that somehow leads you to the exact right place. Beach, guitarist Andrew Bailey, drummer Adam Sachs, and bassist Alex Crawford were all embedded in New York’s DIY music scene working on their own music projects when the unraveling of a previous project and an uncanceled studio session lured them into the studio. Beach puts it succinctly, sharing, “It was a lot of fun and when we heard the tapes we were like, ‘Wow, that’s really good.’ So, we just became Wives.” The album was created over a two-year span of time with the friends taking advantage of stolen moments in the studio, never taking it too seriously and just following what felt and sounded right.

“When the four of us came together, it was definitely a unique sound none of us had hit on before in our other musical lives. I think everyone brings something quite unique to the table. I write songs that are, I guess, more traditional. Our bass player is a huge My Bloody Valentine fan, and his vibe is really shoegaze-ey, our guitar player is more modern. Our drummer Andrew is super into death metal and hip-hop. I know the sound of WIives makes a lot of sense because I know where everyone is coming from, but everyone is coming from separate places,” Beach explains.

The band got their start in Queens, New York City’s largest borough, and the nation’s most diverse large county. Much like Wives, it’s full of people coming from different places, but it plays out harmoniously.

“We have mad Queens love, and I think Queens is the best borough in New York by far,” Beach shares when asked about the backdrop of their start. “People are a little more chill in Queens; it’s a little more of a family vibe, and there are still many ethnic communities that are intact. There’s [a] flourishing Polish community and Eastern European community, little Bangladesh, little Nepal,” Beach says. “It’s like a good social experiment. Like let’s take the most diverse amount of people you can and, like, throw them into a place, and it mostly works out, you know?”

That organic coming together can be heard in tracks like “Even The Dead.” It’s anything but over-practiced or contrived; it’s exactly what you would hear live. “There are no overdubs, no nothing,” Beach shares when asked about the track. “We just started playing this one riff and went for it for those five minutes and recorded it on tape. That’s it. That’s the final track. Obviously that kind of lightning in a bottle doesn’t happen all the time. That’s rare. But when we have a piece, like, we really believe in, we just keep it. We don’t fuck with it. It might not be perfect. It might not be a No. 1 single but it has something, a spontaneity, that’s really hard to find.”

One of the albums poppier moments comes by way of “The 20 Teens.” Beach shares that while listening to A Flock of Seagulls playing at a Bushwick restaurant, he had the thought that all the lyrics might as well have been “This is the ’80s, this is the ’80s,” since the track seemed to embody the decade so well. He decided to square up to that track, and create his own version for the 2010s, full of references to people reading paper magazines and donning dungarees. The track starts with a sharp and inquisitive “some records are so twisted that they actually happened,” a line Beach found in an old journal he’d been writing in while listening to old 45s.

“You could say it’s positively ironic; I think in our songs there’s a strain of sweetness and nostalgia,” Beach says, and laughs, when I share that the songs seem like perfect listening for both pre-party and post-breakup. “Even though there’s also this stance of New York cynicism, it’s in there too,” he adds.

There’s something in the way Beach sings that makes your ears perk up. Like Lou Reed from a pulpit, it feels biblical. You can’t help but attempt to decipher messages hidden in the lyrics, something that could save us from our present-day chaos, or at least make us more comfortable with it. The album has moments of respite, but it magnetizes you back toward careful chaos. See, you can dance through a track like “Hideaway” and move to forget, but then the closing track, “The Future is A Drag” reminds you of the state of things again. Much like the bustling Queens borough, there’s a calm, but not without a commotion.

“When I’m listening to music, it’s more about just being here and now in this time and place and listening to these sounds. Sometimes it’s an old blues record, sometimes it’s a T-Rex record, sometimes it’s Vince Staples — whatever it is. There’s something that just gets captured sometimes that I call ‘the slow within the fast.’ To me, it’s the most amazing thing I can think of experiencing. It’s this marriage between rhythm and, I guess, melody and, not to sound lame, but there’s a shifting thing that happens on really good records like My Bloody Valentine or something like that, where there’s something shifting underneath your feet. The ground is shifting. It could be a fast song — hip-hop does it really well — or it can be a really shoegaze-y thing that’s slower. But, that’s kind of what we’re going for. We want to move people in the way we know is possible to be moved because we’re just lovers of music.”

Debut album ‘So Removed’ – Out now on City Slang

Image may contain: 2 people, text

Michael Stipe

Eight years after R.E.M.’s breakup, frontman Michael Stipe is finally going solo. Stipe said he had 18 songs “already ready.” He explained, “Now I’m writing, composing and recording all by myself and for the first time.”

On Saturday, October 5th, Stipe is too release his debut solo single, “Your Capricious Soul”. The track will initially be available only for purchase through Stipe’s website for 77 cents, though there will also be the option to download the song for free digitally.

The release of “Your Capricious Soul” coincides with the International Rebellion climate justice protests on October 7th, and proceeds from the song will go toward Extinction Rebellion to help aid their work of non-violent protest of government inaction to the climate emergency.

In a statement, Stipe says, “I took a long break from music, and I wanted to jump back in. I love ‘Your Capricious Soul’ – it’s my first solo work. I want to add my voice to this exciting shift in consciousness. Extinction Rebellion gave me the incentive to push the release and not wait. Our relationship to the environment has been a lifelong concern, and I now feel hopeful—optimistic, even. I believe we can bring the kind of change needed to improve our beautiful planet earth, our standing and our place on it.”

A video by artist and filmmaker Sam Taylor-Johnson will accompanying the single’s release

Image may contain: one or more people, people on stage, people playing musical instruments, concert and night

The six-track EP features Maisie vocals and melodies that will have you humming for hours.

The opening track, “This Is On You”, is a sassy bop about letting go of the person who took you for granted. Released as her third single of 2019, lyrics from the chorus became the title of the EP. “Who gave it all, and held you up / When nobody else gave a fuck? / Who bailed you out? / That was all me,” Maisie sings sweetly, before putting the responsibility rightly back on their shoulders: “And you need me now but I’m clocking out / So this is on you.”

“Adore You” sees her take a more poppy turn. A perfect radio play, the tune features a summery rhythm, quick, upbeat guitar chords and breathy, happy lyrics such as, “So high that I am floating / So good that I’m outta my head / So low baby I was hurtin’ / You make it better again.”

“Take Care of Yourself”, is a sentimental, acoustic-style ode to a friend who always puts on a brave face and lacks confidence in themselves: “I hate how you talk to yourself / It’s not weak if you need to be held.”

“April Showers” is lyrically a very classic Maisie styled track lamenting an ex moving on with someone new. “When April showers / You wash her hair / She’s got your heart inside her hands / As the water falls / I bet it’s gonna wash out every thought you ever had of me.” Melodically, it features vocoder-tinged vocal layers and a heartbeat synth.

“Look At Me Now” is another heartbreak track, yet this one begins pared-back, with just Maisie’s delicate vocals and a piano the focus. “I’m making a fool of myself / While you’re happy with somebody else / Well look at me, look at me, look at me now.”

The final song on the EP, “Personal Best”, was written with Oh Wonder in their London home. You can feel their magnetic influence on the beautiful, nostalgic track about missing someone. “You’re my favourite escape in the city / And I don’t feel right unless you are here with me / All we are is the greatest of victories / You’re my personal best.”

Maisie shared an emotional Instagram post celebrating the release of her sophomore EP, writing, “It feels like this really concise portal to me aged 19 exactly right this minute right now and it makes me dizzy that this whole little family of us can now dance and scream and cry and stomp to it for the rest of our lives.”

Image may contain: 3 people, people sitting and indoor

Image may contain: 1 person

In the two years since releasing their second album Paint, it’s clear that Holy Holy have been making some changes and broadening their horizons. These efforts arrive in the form of their latest album, My Own Pool Of Light. The intricate melodies, soundscapes, and ever-present alluring hooks haven’t been left behind. One could say they’ve simply been given a new home amongst a plethora of fresh sounds and instrumentation.

Holy Holy’s third album My Own Pool of Light, arriving via Wonderlick/Sony Music Australia , is a twelve-track masterclass on how Holy Holy have grown into this messaging throughout the last five years, combining dizzying rhythms and flourishing melodies with some of current-day’s most important and prevalent topics – mental health, toxic masculinity, gender stereotypes and homophobia among them. “I wanted to write songs that really meant something on this album, that really had something at the core of why it was being written. Each song was trying to say something,” says Carroll on the album’s themes, and you can really feel this harnessed as the album’s punchy – yet, impactful – duration draws longer.

The first song we wrote for this album revolves around a 60s sounding vocal loop. We wanted to make it sound like an old sample and after many iterations, we got it there. The loop, built out of vocals from Ali Barter, Ainslie Wills and myself, is the bed upon which the song builds. Driving drums, menacing offbeat synths and fast tambourines back a wide-ranging spoken vocal approach.

This, and Tim’s vocal. It’s more based upon samples, and less on guitar. Faces is about a lot of things – online arguments; smartphone narcissism; the Australian treatment of refugees; and our ability to ignore inconvenient truths. It lays out a lot of the ideas that we’ve been wrestling with, and sets the tone for the rest of the record.

Pegged as the group’s biggest creative leap since the release of their debut album five years ago, ‘Maybe You Know’ kicks off the album with a steady drum beat and a sharp riff. It’s accompanied by songs like ‘Flight’, ‘Sandra’ and ‘Teach Me About Dying’, all of which provide the perfect marriage of the new and the old.

‘Hatswing’ is a taster of the musicality and creativity the duo has had hidden up their sleeve. It’s a rhythmically urgent tune that relies on the impeccable percussion to drive it along, yet still manages to maintain the anthemic vocals that fans have come to love from Holy Holy.

Vocalist Timothy Carroll comes through at the end of the record with a hauntingly slow and atmospheric vocal performance on ‘St Petersburg’. It’s one of the many songs on the 12-track album that give an idea of the creative freedom finally attained by Carroll and guitarist Oscar Dawson.

Band Members
Timothy Carroll, Oscar Dawson, Ryan Strathie (and special guests Graham Ritchie & Matt Redlich)

Holy Holy’s brand new album ‘My Own Pool Of light’ is out now!

Image may contain: text

“Shiny New Model,” from NYC band Bodega’s new EP of the same name, folds in quiet meditations on the sterility of late-capitalist innovations and the complicated realities of the gig economy. “Tell me don’t you relate to the state of that silver sepulchre?” frontman Ben Hozie asks in relation to ATMs. “Tell me don’t you feel used? Buttons pressed in the back of a bodega.” He’s singing over a pirouetting guitar line and an intimate bass groove. It’s not quite glam, not quite grunge, but just the right combination of both.

The mini album Shiny New Model covers various thematic ground: history alive in the present, the sadness of modern consumption, adultery via sexting, and a song set inside an actual bodega (Shiny New Model). In addition to the breezy hook-filled songs, the vinyl and CD feature an extended improvised version of the group’s staple track Truth Is Not Punishment.The band has been using this song as a vehicle for live improvisation for a year and decided to use a day of the session to experiment with capturing the song’s new, extended boundaries in the studio.

From the upcoming EP “Shiny New Model” out on What’s Your Rupture? Oct 11th.

Image may contain: one or more people, closeup and text

Despite enduring as one of post-punk’s most iconic artists thanks to her work with Sonic Youth, Free Kitten and Body/Head, Kim Gordon has still yet to release a solo album. That’ll change this week in October with No Home Record, her first full-length under her own name, to be released by Matador Records. And from the bass bombs that punctuate advance track “Sketch Artist,” it sounds like she still has some new sounds in store for longtime fans.

Kim Gordon doesn’t put much stock in the superlatives that have piled up around her over the years: pioneer, visionary, icon, legend, beacon. “Being referred to as an ‘icon,’ blah blah blah,” she said recently in the New York Times. “What does that even mean?” Fair enough, but you’d be forgiven for thinking she’s earned it. As a visual artist, co-founder of Sonic Youth, fashion designer and occasional actor, Gordon has been a magnetic, and inscrutable, focal point of indie cool for nearly 40 years. In all that time, her musical pursuits have come in group projects: 15 studio albums with Sonic Youth, three each as part of Free Kitten and Body/Head and one with Glitterbust, along with various EPs and singles scattered among them. Now, at the age of 66, Gordon steps out with No Home Record, a ferocious solo debut. It’s jagged, chaotic and mesmerizing in a way that pulls you inevitably into the thick of it, as if the songs were exerting their own inescapable gravity. Gordon tinkers throughout with rhythms, intoning short, incisive lyrical phrases over a hypnotic mechanical beat on “Cookie Butter,” and letting the electro-clash drums on “Sketch Artist” drop out here and there for free-form interludes. Toward the end of No Home Record, she skips the beat altogether on “Earthquake,” singing in dusky tones over drifting guitars, crescendos of cymbal wash and some crumbly electronic noise in the background.

From Kim Gordon’s new album ‘“No Home Record” released on Matador Records on October 11th.