Posts Tagged ‘Secretly Canadian’

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Someone give Stella Donnelly one of those vintage ribbon microphones and an early slot at the comedy club. Actually, a guitar and a venue stage should suffice for now, but let it be known that this Australian singer/songwriter rivals Mrs. Maisel in her abilities to pair humor with heartbreak and absolutely command a room. She’s an ace with a crowd, but her real talent for wordplay shows up in the masterful lyrics on her debut EP, Thrush Metal, a name that only serves to sound “cool,” . That title might only be a slick word-pairing, but the music itself is chock full of meaning—wise words on awful men, victim blaming and dwindling relationships, as well as blossoming ones.

Boys Will Be Boys is my attempt at making sense of society’s tendency to blame the victims of sexual assault and rape and make excuses for the perpetrators. It was also my way of dealing with certain events that were occurring in my life at the time. The video itself was intended to express the burden of victim blaming and sexual assault on the victims themselves as the mundane aspects of life go on. A song is just a song but at the very least I hope it will open up difficult yet important conversations between family members, friends, government bodies, organisations and most importantly, boys and men.

It’s hard to decide which is more the standout track, the searing “Mechanical Bull” or “Boys Will Be Boys,” a #MeToo anthem for the ages. Thankfully, we don’t have to choose, but the latter is the song many needed to hear in 2018, especially after Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court: “Boys will be boys” is not a viable excuse for, as Donnelly puts it, “invading her magnificence.” Nor is beer. In fact, there’s never an excuse. And maybe all of the tracks on Thrush Metal are standouts. This EP is a truly magnificent bud to Donnelly’s blooming discography.

Stella Donnelly’s ’Thrush Metal EP’, out digitally released on June 22nd 2018 on Secretly Canadian.

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Stuffed & Ready

After releasing 2016’s critically acclaimed “Apocalipstick”, Cherry Glazerr spent the next 18 months touring the world on their own steam.

Btween diy all ages venues, rock clubs, large festival stages, and massive theaters with some of the world’s best and most beloved bands (the pixies, flaming lips, slowdive, and the breeders, among others), the band has really only stopped to work on their follow up, ttled “Stuffed & Ready”. while furiously building the band’s sound and ideas, With the amazing front person Clem Creevy she enlisted Carlos de la Garza to be the band’s studio co-collaborator as they evolved the songs and refined the recordings.

The LA-based trio Cherry Glazerr have released this song. Now I hope you understand what all the fuss is about. Led by 21-year-old frontwoman Clementine Creevy, the band have just announced this their fourth album, Stuffed & Ready, wll be out February 1st. Iggy Pop has been a fan of these guys for ages, so they’re definitely doing in the  right direction.

“Wasted Nun” from ‘Stuffed & Ready’ by Cherry Glazerr out February 1st, 2019 on Secretly Canadian

Richard Swift: <i>The Hex</i> Review

Richard Swift’s final album, The Hex, drops tomorrow, September. 21st through Secretly Canadian. Swift, a longtime collaborator of The Shins, The Black Keys and more, died in July at the age of 41. Listening to Swift’s final song, “Sept20,” is an experience in epiphany. It goes something like this: You listen to the song, a vaguely melancholy piano ditty elevated by Swift’s eerie falsetto, and maybe you feel a bit thrown off by the show tunes-y chorus. You might puzzle over where you’ve heard his name before. The first realization comes with seeing that today is Sept. 20, and that this song is supposed to be some microcosm of today. Then you see the single artwork, a scrawled note, and as you read along, you find Swift speaking the words into being. There’s scratches, cross-outs. It’s his lyric sheet.

What a final statement it is. The Hex is tuneful and confident, immaculately arranged and distinctively produced, and reflective of the man’s longstanding interests in old soul music, vintage pop, fuzzy rock ‘n’ roll and beautiful walls of sound.

It is also strikingly honest, which is perhaps no surprise, since it comes from an artist who had, according to that same family statement, been battling the effects of alcohol addiction over the past couple of years. He makes no bones about his situation in “Broken Finger Blues,” which sounds like a classic Motown track charmingly recorded at the bottom of a well. The sonic details that surround those lyrics — the snappy bass line, the commanding piano chords, the lush backing vocals — belie their harrowing essence. The same could be said for “Wendy,” a desperate love song to Swift’s deceased mother presented as a buzzy ‘60s doo-wop song, complete with “da do run run” refrains. And “Dirty Jim” is a highlight of The Hex, precisely because of the contrast between its sound — a jaunty piano-pop song — and its message, which is more or less a farewell to Swift’s loved ones.

Elsewhere, “Selfishmath” is swaggering life lesson shot through with a sinister bass line. “Sister Song” and “Nancy” find Swift encouraging the women in his life through the echoes of reverb and time. The latter — with its undulating synths and vocals by Swift’s daughters — is particularly affecting. And you can almost hear the man himself giggling at the juxtaposition of “HZLWD” — a gently rolling baroque-pop instrumental — and the grating spoken-word experiment called “Kensington!”

The Hex ends modestly with “Sept20,” which finds Swift at the piano, sounding Elliott Smith-ish and singing of health and poison wells and sickness and death. The song ends somewhat abruptly, without some grand final statement or crescendo to tie everything up neatly.

In a way, though, that’s exactly the right ending for Richard Swift, a quintessential musician’s musician, and a top-shelf man behind the curtain. He was better known for his studio acumen and production work than his own songs, yes, but his solo albums are revered among those lucky enough to have heard them. The Hex will only bolster his legacy.

End Of The Road 2018

Breaking out of Australia with the stark and poignant Boys Will Be Boys, Stella Donnelly was hailed an overnight feminist folk hero. Taking inspiration from the likes of Angel Olsen, and with a slight nod to the lyrical prowess of fellow Aussie Courtney Barnett, Donnelly’s debut and wonderfully titled Thrush Metal EP just got a re-issue on Secretly Canadian with full marks from most music press, including us. Most certainly one to watch and fawn over.

Donnelly played “Talking” in Conductors and Resistance, an art installation by the Israeli artist Ronen Sharabani that’s on display as part of the SXSW Art Program. Like Donnelly’s direct and feminist folk songs.

Stella Donnelly so far has only one EP to her name, but that’s been enough to make her sharp wit come through in sweet, quiet songs that rage loudly. The Australian singer-songwriter’s Thrush Metal EP was recently reissued in the U.S. with a bonus track, “Talking,” which she performs here surrounded by video of wires, a weaving machine and woolen yarns.

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The Thrush Metal EP originally came out last year, self-released by the artist on tape and digitally. Stella Donnelly quickly became one of Australia’s buzziest young singer-songwriters and now Secretly Canadian release the EP on Vinyl. Boys Will Be Boys is the standout track. Atop delicate, singsongy acoustic fingerpicking, Donnelly confronts a man who raped her friend and takes to task the accompanying victim-blaming. “Why was she all alone? / Wearing her shirt that low / And they said boys will be boys / Deaf to the word no,” she coos in the chorus, a slight vibrato flaring up at the corners of her lovely voice.

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Stella Donnelly is a stunning new singer songwriter talent. Powerful songs sung with a powerful voice. Listening, and watching with interest.

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I am so thrilled to be welcomed into the Secretly Canadian family who I now have an international record deal with. I am so excited to meet the whole team at SXSW! , We hailed Stella Donnelly as our 2017 Artist of the Year for her star-making live show and ability to “dissect raw subject matter with with and breathtaking incisiveness” on songs about toxic masculinity and sexual predators that felt especially on-point in a year that Weinstein-gate and the #MeToo movement trended like a tidal wave.

Whereas the clip for ‘Boys Will Be Boys’ was a more austere, meditative experience, the Charlotte Evans-directed ‘Mechanical Bull’ video is a far more colourful affair, though it’s got teeth. Set in a diner, it stars Stella as a waitress serving up mannequin parts to creepy dudes. It’s a simple but effective take that’s on the same frequency as the song’s message about the objectification of women.

Now, her stark track ‘Mechanical Bull’ has been given a visual treatment that translates those concepts into a cutting bit of satire. “The song, ‘Mechanical Bull,‘ is dedicated to people who work in hospitality who have to deal with customers, especially drunk ones, harassing them and making objectifying comments. I wrote this about my experience working in bars and it was a nice way to release some of the frustration I had!”

To celebrate this, they have re-released my Thrush Metal EP with an extra track that I wrote called ‘Talking’.  Another standout from the Perth songwriter’s Thrush Metal EP has been given a biting visual treatment.

Also for the people who have asked me about vinyls, you can now pre order the 12” white vinyl limited edition of Thrush Metal available June 22nd.

Cherry Glazerr played an amazing set at Nottingham Dot to Dot Festival this year, that this concert was so insane and so much fun . If you were not there please check Cherry Glazerr out if you have’nt heard of them before! . a truly wonderful set . Celebrating the release of their third album earlier this year, despite the fact that lead-singer Clementine Creevy is only 19 she came crawling onto the stage on all fours you knew then this was going to be something a little bit special, Cherry Glazerr are from Los Angeles, they arrive on the cusp of something big. Musically, it’s all slightly grungy early-mid 90s riffs, female empowerment lyrics and youthful energy.

Their album “Apocalipstick” is one of the best albums of the year.

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Los Angeles rockers Cherry Glazerr, are led by 19-year-old singer Clementine Creevy, the band signed to Secretly Canadian for the release of their latest album Apocalipstick. . Clem, a teen Queen with a headstrong resolve like her hero Patti Smith and a cartoon laugh like Muttley the dog, dreamed up Cherry Glazerr in her LA bedroom alone and is perhaps more capable of figuring a music career out than anyone who attempts this treacherous life path. And yet, she carries herself very lightly. “This one’s going to be a flop!” she jokes, here to discuss the newly lined-up trio’s second album, Apocalipstick. It’s every bit as epic, funny, life-assuring, doom-defiant and flaming fire as that title sounds. Now bolstering Clem’s vision is the loud-in-every-way-possible drummer Tabor Allen and the level-headed but bad-ass, multi-instrumentalist Sasami Ashworth who plays synths and notably French Horn (Clem is still scheming on how to incorporate that into Cherry Glazerr’s sound). The first time the new trio all jammed together minds were blown. “My world was rocked,” recalls Clem. “I’d never played with someone who was technically that good before. It made me think, Man I gotta really step my shit up!”

The phenomenal Cherry Glazerr at Cheer Up Charlie’s in Austin on Saturday, March 18th, 2017

She Devils are a band out of Montreal that make exceptionally fun, intelligent post-punk that’s keen on reinterpreting vintage sounds. Today, the band has released a new video for “Hey Boy,” off of their upcoming self-titled record. The video feels like a throwback from top to bottom. From its background settings down to makeup styles, it evokes a style that’s of the past, and yet it doesn’t get lost to the point where they run on nostalgia. The synths and organic instruments wrap around each other for a sound that’s comforting, but running with undertones of weirdness. It’s a great take on the genre, one that sets them apart from the pack based on their sense of style.

Having released their debut four-track EP in January last year, The Montreal duo She-Devils are back with self-titled full-length record, out 19th May. To celebrate, they are serving us up a double whammy:check out the video for their lead track Hey Boy,

It was around four years ago that Kyle Jukka and Audrey Ann Boucher first joined forces under their united moniker “I think we’re linked souls on a shared trajectory toward an illusive and gradually shifting target, time had just woven together as creative partners before we could notice it happening,” says Jukka. Plugging in and followed this instinctive connection, the duo discovered their distinctive sound – like Dick Dale and Nico, should they ever meet in a lucid dream.

“Hey Boy” off our self-titled debut album, out May 19th on Secretly Canadian