Posts Tagged ‘Atlanta’

Atlanta-based indie-rock all stars Manchester Orchestra composed of rhythm guitarist-singer-songwriter Andy Hull, lead guitarist Robert McDowell, bassist Andy Prince and drummer Tim Very will shortly release their lush sixth album “The Million Masks of God”. It is a true pleasure and joy to finally share the first piece of music from our sixth full length album “The Million Masks of God”. It’s near impossible to put into words what this album means to us on a personal level. I’m amazed and grateful at how so much hard work from so many incredible people ended up working together to finally get us here. I’m so happy it’s here. This record, what it’s about and what it represents holds a particularly intimate place in our hearts. Writing it, creating it, building it, destroying it and rebuilding it together over the last two and a half years has been the most gratifying challenge of our career so far. I hope that you enjoy it as much as we enjoyed creating it. Thank you for your continued support of our band. We can’t wait to go on this next journey together.

This exclusive vinyl variant is 140g on “sea blue.” The Million Masks of God is limited to only 500 copies, 

Releases April 30th, 2021

Mamalarky spent two years working on their self-titled debut album (released last year via Fire Talk on November 20th). Raw and cerebral, the LP looks to a range of influences from their collective musical nerdiness. ”We might have a vocal melody that sounds like the lead steel guitar from Santo & Johnny, played over production that aims to be noisy and weird like Deerhoof or Sheer Mag, all the while steeped in the greats like Stevie Wonder or The Four Seasons,’ explains Livvy. The album itself was cobbled together in a mix of DIY ways: home recordings with Livvy’s roommate Joey Oaxaca (White Reaper, Mo Dotti), singles with Daniel McNeill (White Denim) and a “final wrapping-up” with engineer Jim Vollentine (Spoon, Skating Polly). The result is an album that’s as musically fun and explorative as it is catchy and sweet. Or as Mamalarky puts it “We want to provide an experience that’s exploratory and trippy, but far removed from the problematic and corny psych stereotypes carried out by all those 60s dude bands.”

“Any song on Mamalarky’s self-titled debut deserves to be a single.” – Vice

“Mamalarky are a band that emanates cool factor.” –  

The harmony is beautiful and slightly strange. The drums are really strong, the vocalist is really skilled. The guitars and synths are really tasteful. Basically, the sound overall is really original, and really satisfying.

Mamalarky spent two years working on their self-titled debut album. Mamalarky  debut album out October 14th on Fire Talk Records.

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On December 4th, Atlanta punk rockers The Coathangers acknowledged an upcoming 15 year milestone for their previously out-of-print self-titled debut album by releasing a Deluxe Edition of the collection with Suicide Squeeze Records, featuring remastering of the tracks and bonus material. A timely and punchy music video has also been released for one the tracks, “Nestle in My Boobies”, drawn from footage of a sweaty live performance in 2011. Watching the video now definitely promotes a vicarious thrill, aware that no concert like that one could occur at this time, but that also highlights The Coathangers’ particular magic as a band, always conscious of the value of capturing specific, unique, moments in time in all their glory. 

Coathangers singer/guitarist Julia Kugel recently discussed this reflective moment in time for The Coathangers, what life was like for them around the time of recording that first album, how they fit into the musical scene at the time in their hometown of Atlanta, Georgia, Oddly enough, we were planning on taking this year off. But we were so lucky to get to play that Coachella show with Blondie. Our only show of 2020 was the highlight of my fucking life, all of our lives! That’s pretty much 2020 in a nutshell, asking, “What the fuck?” But we hadn’t been home much in 12 or 13 years, so we were going to take some time off anyway. 

we never called ourselves Punk, because that’s kind of un-Punk to do that! When people would shout at shows, “They’re not Punk!”, I would shout back, “I never said I was Punk Rock, bitch!” I think we’re Punk in attitude and inspired by it, but there was not a formula of sound that we tried to follow. Punk is fast, though, fast and short, and that shit’s awesome, it pumps you up! The best description we ever got was “Psycho-Pop”, so we called ourselves Psycho-Pop, No-Wave, and a bunch of others. We used to throw things out at people just to confuse them.

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Eight of the finest performances from Bruce Springsteen’s 1978 tour are now available in a limited, collectible box set. This 24-CD set contains all five of the legendary radio broadcasts on the Darkness On The Edge Of Town tour: The Roxy in L.A., The Agora in Cleveland, The Capitol Theatre in Passaic, NJ, Fox Theatre in Atlanta and Winterland in San Francisco. Rounding out the collection are the second shows in Passaic and San Francisco, plus the December 8th show in Houston, Texas. A limited number of empty boxes are also available to hold previously purchased CDs.

By Erik Flannigan

I’ve written before about the role the Darkness tour radio broadcasts played in the career development of Bruce Springsteen. Broadcast live from the Agora in Cleveland, the Capitol Theatre in Passaic, The Roxy in West Hollywood, and Winterland in San Francisco, those concerts were recorded off air by thousands of people listening at home in 1978. In the years that followed, many wore out their tapes, playing them again and again as the only “official” live Springsteen product until Live/1975-85 was released in 1986.

Through the “magic of bootlegging,” home recordings wound up on illicit vinyl pressings like Piece de Resistance and Live in the Promised LandCopies of those LPs made their way to Europe, which wasn’t visited by the Darkness tour itself, so overseas fans at least got to hear Springsteen on stage. He and the band wouldn’t return to those shores until 1981; for such Bruce-starved fans, those recordings were manna from heaven. Without question, the familiarity fans have with the broadcast recordings of shows like The Roxy and Capitol Theatre cemented their status among Bruce’s greatest performances ever. But what if there were another?

It would be an exaggeration to call Atlanta 9/30/78 “the lost broadcast.” But compared to the other four, which were pressed multiple times on vinyl and CD bootlegs, Atlanta is the least familiar, having no meaningful history on bootleg vinyl and a limited one on CD. Originally broadcast live on radio stations across the Southeast, Atlanta 9/30/78 is the fifth and final Darkness tour transmission released in the Live Archive series. While not as familiar to fans as other ’78 broadcasts, the blistering Atlanta performance more than holds its own and is newly mixed from Plangent Processed, multi-track analogue master tapes. The 23-song show presents a potent core Darkness tour setlist augmented by the yet to be released “Independence Day” and “Point Blank,” plus special additions “Santa Claus Is Coming To Town,” “Raise Your Hand” and the only performance ever of James Brown’s “Night Train.”

The home recording enthusiasts alluded to above were certainly more plentiful in the Tri-State area, for the Passaic broadcast, than in the Southeast for Atlanta. Other broadcasts got wider distribution (the Agora show was syndicated to FM rock stations around the country after the fact) or were simply bigger events to begin with (Bruce’s Roxy appearance was the most buzzed-about show in Los Angeles in 1978). On the other hand, Atlanta and the Southeast were more of a development opportunity for Springsteen that year, and legend has it, stormy weather in the region on 9/30/78 caused reception problems for those who did record.

All of which explains why, as fans traded tapes and bought bootlegs in the ’70s and ’80s, the quality of the Atlanta broadcast, if it could be found at all, was inferior to the other four broadcast recordings, hence its outlier status. But one listen to Jon Altschiller’s new mix from Plangent Processed, 24-track analogue master tapes and Atlanta is an outlier no more.

The 9/30/78 set captures the Darkness tour “picked at the peak of freshness,” as the old commercial used to say. It’s like getting a lost episode of Seinfeld, shot but never aired during Season 5. The official release of this Fox Theatre show gives us the chance to fall in love all over again with a spectacular slice of Springsteen ’78.

After a great intro to the stage, the show smashes to a start with “Good Rockin’ Tonight” straight into “Badlands.” Each E Street Band member quickly shows they are in it to win it this night, with first-among-equals Roy Bittan carrying the melodic load with aplomb, as he will throughout the night. “Spirit in the Night” sets the band-fan tenor. “Darkness on the Edge of Town” is flawless, and Bruce sings with total conviction — no more so than on a subtle lyric change, replacing “Where nobody asks any questions or looks too long in your face” with, “You can drive all night, and never make it around.”

Sonically, Atlanta offers crystalline clarity. In the stately “Independence Day,” which Bruce introduces as the “flipside to ‘Adam Raised a Cain’,” the level of instrumental detail — from Danny’s glockenspiel to Max’s hi-hat, Garry’s bass to Stevie’s delicate strumming — is breath taking and immersive. It pulls you into what just might be your new favourite version of “Independence Day,” a sentiment you are likely to feel across several Atlanta performances. Yes, the audience is mixed just right, too.

The rest of the first set holds to the same gold standard as we move from a faultless “The Promised Land” to a scintillating, extended “Prove It All Night” that’s as good if not better than any version you’ve heard from this tour — and that’s saying something. 

The same goes for “Racing in the Street.” Listen for a gorgeous and distinct bit of interplay between Danny and Roy around the 2:05 mark. The first set wraps with the peerless pairing of “Thunder Road” and “Jungleland.” It doesn’t get any better than this.

“Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town” opens the second half of the show in jolly spirits, and because the fake snow that fell needed to be swept up by stagehands, Bruce and the band vamp by paying tribute to one of Atlanta’s adopted sons, James Brown. They play the Godfather of Soul’s “Night Train” so well, one would think the song was in the set every night of the tour. In fact, this is the only performance ever of “Night Train.”

“Fire” extends the frivolity before the tone turns dramatic via “Candy’s Room.” Danny and Roy again weave around each other in stunning fashion in the long intro to “Because the Night,” which includes a superlative guitar solo in yet another “name a better one” version. The second River preview of the night, “Point Blank,” surely sent anticipation soaring for Springsteen’s next album, with Danny and Roy intricately swirling behind the striking original lyrics.

E Street Band vocals in the “Not Fade Away/Gloria” intro to “She’s the One” have never sounded livelier, the guitar licks never more Link Wray than this terrific extended reading, another reminder of how special it is to re-live such a beautifully recorded document of the tour. “Backstreets” provides a tour de force denouement, with the middle section a Van Morrison-inspired, mind-blowing melange of “sad eyes,” “Drive All Night,” “you lied,” and “we’ve got to stop.” Listening to the Atlanta version will reaffirm everything you love about the song, this tour, and these musicians.

Even venerable “Rosalita” gets an intriguing instrumental introduction more than two minutes long. There are so many moments in Atlanta 9/30/78 that are just a little different from the Darkness shows we know best, and it is all the more compelling because of it.

The traditional but no less exceptional Darkness tour encore of “Born to Run,” “Tenth Avenue Freeze-out” and “Detroit Medley” brings us home, and the night ends with one of only eight tour performances of “Raise Your Hand,” far fewer than you’d guess because all five broadcasts are counted among those eight renditions. With the release of Atlanta, the quintet of 1978 broadcasts in the Live Archive series is now complete, representing not only some of the greatest Bruce Springsteen performances of all time, but arguably the greatest live concert recordings in rock history. 

8 Complete Shows On 24 Factory-Pressed CDs.
• 7/8/78 The Roxy, West Hollywood, CA
• 8/9/78 The Agora, Cleveland, OH
• 9/19/78 Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ
• 9/20/78 Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ
• 9/30/78 Fox Theatre, Atlanta, GA
• 12/8/78 The Summit, Houston, TX
• 12/15/78 Winterland Arena, San Francisco, CA
• 12/16/78 Winterland Arena, San Francisco, CA

Release date February 1st, 2021

Bathe Alone is the dreampop solo project of multi-instrumentalist Bailey Crone based out of Atlanta, Georgia. Bailey plays everything from drums, guitar, bass to vocals on the project and aims to create songs you can “lay on the floor and stare at the ceiling to.”

A couple of months ago, we were introduced to Bailey Crone’s dazzling world called Bathe Alone. The moniker is fitting since Crone’s shoegaze-infused approach is a whole-of-body experience akin to swimming in one of the planet’s most lavish lagoons, as demonstrated on the scintillating “Calm Down”. The Atlanta native, though, can also create soundscapes that feel like an out-of-body experience, shooting listeners to the stars and beyond. So sit back and enjoy the intergalactic ride that is “Curbside”.

With hints of the shoegaze greatness of Lush, Crone at first seduces with a soft, melancholic approach. The lightness of the music is both intoxicating and relaxing, and the gliding mood is interrupted occasionally by the fireworks that ignite from her reverb-drenched guitar. Her voice, though, is angelic, floating through space just like we are. Just as our minds begin to fade away, Crone awakens our senses as her guitar sears and electrifies. This moment is not frightening nor menacing, but rather it represents the start of something new and exciting. It is us entering a new dimension that is full of awe and wonder. It is us awakening to the realization that the next great shoegaze artist lies before us.

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“Curbside” is Bathe Alone’s heaviest offering from her upcoming debut LP Last Looks. The song is a duet in many ways between DI and analogue. There’s clean crisp digital drums delicately intertwined with dirty, grungy, almost trash-can sounding acoustic drums. Then there’s Bathe Alone’s signature clean reverbed-out DI guitar playing alongside a nasty, fuzzy amped guitar with tons of room mic to get that grit. The vocals were inspired by Billie Eilish, where her instrumentation can get intense yet her vocals remain eerily relaxed while layered with tons of harmonies.

Released September 9th, 2020
Bailey Crone – Songwriter, vocals, guitar, drums, bass
Damon Moon – Synth, guitar

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Washed Out is Atlanta-based producer / songwriter / multi-instrumentalist Ernest Greene. Over three enchanting, critically-lauded albums and an EP, his music has proved both transportive and visual, each release inviting listeners into immersive, self-contained universes. With Purple Noon, his fourth album, and his return to Sub Pop, he delivers the most accessible Washed Out creation to date.

Life of Leisure, Washed Out’s 2009 debut EP, set the bar for the Chillwave era, shimmering in a warm haze of off-the-cuff Polaroids and pre-IG filters. Within and Without, his 2011 full-length debut on Sub Pop, morphed into nocturnal, icy synth-pop and embraced provocative imagery. 2013’s Paracosm was Greene’s take on psychedelia, with a full live band and kaleidoscopic light show, and saw him playing to the largest audiences of his career. The sample-heavy Mister Mellow (2017, Stone’s Throw) delivered a 360 audio/visual experience, with cut-n-paste and hand-drawn animation to match the hip-hop influences throughout the album. With each release, Greene has approached his evolving project with meticulous detail and a steadfast vision.

For Purple Noon, Greene again wrote, recorded, and produced the entirety of the album, with mixing handled by frequent collaborator Ben H. Allen (Paracosm, Within and Without). Production of the album followed a brief stint of writing for other artists (most notably Sudan Archives) which enabled Greene to explore genres like R&B and modern pop. These brighter, more robust sounds made their way into the songs of Purple Noon and mark a new chapter for Greene as a producer and songwriter. The vocals are front and center, tempos are slower, beats bolder, and there’s a more comprehensive depth of dynamics. One can hear the luxuriousness of Sade, the sonic bombast of Phil Collins, and the lush atmosphere of the great Balearic beat classics.

Mediterranean coastlines inspired Purple Noon, and Greene pays tribute to the region’s distinct island culture – all rugged elegance and old-world charm – and uses it as a backdrop to tell stories of passion, love, and loss (Purple Noon’s title comes from the 1960 film directed by Rene Clement and based on the novel The Talented Mister Ripley by Patricia Highsmith). Much like romantic Hollywood epics, the melodrama throughout is strong: a serendipitous first meeting in Too Late; a passionate love affair in Paralyzed; disintegration of a relationship in Time to Walk Away; a reunion with a lost love in Game of Chance. Purple Noon adds a layer of emotional intensity to the escapism of Washed Out’s oeuvre, taking the music to dazzling new heights.

Washed OutTime to Walk Away from the album Purple Noon (Release Date: 8/07/2020) Sub Pop Records.

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As much as people want to dance, or want to mosh their brains out as post punk, surf punk, indie rock festivals (remember festivals?) people also want to chill, to sway to post punk and post rock psychedelia. The music of Reverends is dreamy and the saving grace at any house party.The track “8 Million” is such a song. It is by Atlanta psych rock band Reverends and upon first listen I thought a bit about California indie bands like Allah-Las, Mystic Braves and Cosmonauts (at least the chiller aspects of their surf punk sound) or a combination of all three. On 8 Million, Reverends provide the languid intoxication and chord progs that are classic for this genre and some of those progs have undoubtedly been played by those aforementioned Cali psyche bands. That is no sin, this genre like the blues borrows heavily. The point is how well you do it and Reverends do it so well, they keep the slow burn moving like a buzz when you’re high but provide guitars sounds that shape shift, squeal, turn into bent alien sounds of life and high life and jam nicely too. What else do you need when you just want to drift away?.

Band Members:
Dandy Lee Strickland – Vocals/Guitar/Keys/Etc
Kyle Jones – drums
Andy Watts – guitar/keys
Matt Boehnlein – guitar/bass/keys/vocals
Henry Jack – bass/vocals

“8 Million”, from Reverends’ album The Disappearing Dreams of Yesterday, released on Little Cloud Records.

Faye Webster

If alt-country seems inaccessible, let Faye Webster ease you into the genre with an R&B saxophone yawn or rap verse courtesy of Father. The Atlanta singer-songwriter didn’t turn alt-country on its head with Atlanta Millionaires Club, but she did dress it up enough to give folk-pop and soft-rock fans a natural in to the genre. Maybe it’s her breathy lilt. Maybe it’s the moderation of slide guitar. Whatever the trick is, Webster knows it makes her songs irresistibly coquettish.

It’s hard to believe musician and photographer Faye Webster is only 21 years old and has released her third album and one that just drips with a pensiveness of someone twice that age. The singer does have a way of writing serene indie folk that is perfectly balanced for any time of day. She immediately throws you into her world and it’s one that is fully realized and achingly alluring.

It’s worth asking Faye Webster about the origins of her song, “Pigeon.” In addition to being a musician, Atlanta-based Faye Webster is a photographer and a yo-yo whiz, even going so far as to craft her own custom yo-yo that she dubbed “The Pigeon.” But there’s something else.

“I sent this dude in Australia a pigeon with a note on its leg, a carrier pigeon, because I liked him,” Webster explains. “I sent him a note. It was the first time I ever sent somebody a pigeon, so I had to write a song about it.”

Before their show at the 7th Street Entry in Minneapolis, Faye Webster and her band stopped in The Current studio to talk to host Jade and to play songs from Webster’s album, Atlanta Millionaires Club.

Faye Webster performs ‘Room Temperature’ from her 2019 album, ‘Atlanta Millionaires Club,’ live in The Current studio.  Webster’s songs have a warm, dreamy and nostalgic quality, the origins of which aren’t quite so enigmatic. “I listened to a lot of Western swing and old country music just because my mom’s from Texas and her whole family is musical,” Webster says. “So I grew up around that a lot, just that [music] playing in the car or in the house. And then I guess I found my own music that I liked when I grew up, but I think that [influence has] always kind of been there.”

Songs Performed:

“Room Temperature”
“Pigeon”
“Kingston”

All songs from Faye Webster’s 2019 album, Atlanta Millionaires Club, available on Secretly Canadian.

The Black Lips new album ‘Sing In A World That’s Falling Apart’ and new single ‘Gentleman’ both continue to flick the middle finger to one and all.
This ain’t another gaggle of bearded southern sons fleeing their collective suburban upbringings and collegiate music education. There aren’t the usual clichés about drinking, honkytonks, and heartbreak. These are, after all, the same Black Lips who rescued the waning garage punk subgenre by not sounding or dressing their musical predecessors. They also dug contemporary hip-hop and punk and actualized themselves

Like so many dramatic moments in the Black Lips career, ‘Sing In A World That’s Falling Apart’ was born out of crisis. The band’s stylistic evolution through decades of prolific touring and recording took them where no garage punk band had gone before – huge venues, network television shows, and major music festivals.

Here Black Lips are at their grimiest, most dangerous and equipped with the best collection of songs since the aughts. Skidding onto the asphalt in a shower of sparks, they roll on with an unapologetic southern-fried twang, pacing the beast, every now and then dropping a psycho howl into the rubber room madness lurking underneath the truckstop fireworks.

Atlanta originals, The Black Lips join forces with Fire Records revealing first single ‘Odelia’ with a new album out early 2020 in collaboration with Vice. Now twenty years into their career the exuberant quintet are touring across the US before heading to Europe for an extensive tour this November.

A powerhouse of angst wrapped in traditional melodies, it’s a wild rumble fusing their musical journey from garage rockpunk and psychedelia into a mind-blowing hybrid of cosmic broken country, fragmented Paisley Pop and heart-on-the-sleeve back porch reportage, all delivered with vengeance in their eyes.

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Prolific Athens-based experimentalists Je Suis France are releasing their most ambitious record to date today, following the band’s sharing its first fizzling, thrashy-trashy cut, “House Style,” . Unlike the band’s latter records, Back to the Basics of Love wasn’t written in a constant flux or hashed out between slow internet connections. The record was the product of all of the members of the band coming together from their half-dozen separate cities and communities, and letting their creativity sync up in unison for the first time since 2003’s Fantastic Area.

Je Suis France doesn’t have an off switch. Back to the Basics of Love, which comes out this November from the Ernest Jenning Record Co., will be their seventh official full-length album, but they’ve also released dozens of digital releases and CD-Rs stretching back to the early ‘00s. The band, which first came together in Athens, Georgia, in the ‘90s, has prepared a new release for almost every show they’ve played since 2004. Despite that long history of experimentation, Back to the Basics of Love has all the energy and urgency of a debut from a band that’s 20 years younger. It’s a record that sounds like it could’ve come out in the 1990s, the 2000s, or the 2010s, but that couldn’t have existed at any point other than now.

Je Suis France – House Style – from the album Back To The Basics Of Love