Posts Tagged ‘Montreal’

POTTERY – ” No. 1 “

Posted: December 12, 2019 in MUSIC, ALBUMS
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After a solid performance at this year’s South By Southwest and tours opening for Parquet Courts, Viagra Boys, Oh Sees and Fontaines D.C., Montreal five-piece Pottery released their debut EP No. 1, recorded in just over two nights and cut live to tape. Crediting Orange Juice, Josef K and DEVO as influences, Pottery blend the whimsical, danceable and the arty leanings of some of pop and punk’s greatest groups. The instrumental “Smooth Operator” is a slinky opener, evolving from a cool and collected bluesy strut to an anxious punk freakout. Another somewhat rootsy tune “Hank Williams” is unexpected, but it’s one of the peppiest country-punk tracks since Iceage stomper “The Lord’s Favorite.” “The Craft” finds their eccentric post-punk at its sharpest and most cartoonish. Their wonky percussion, frisky vocal snarls and lyrics of life’s rat race result in freakish art-pop profundity

The chorus to “Hank Williams,” Pottery’s debut single, is “Hank Williams does speed for the first time.” Apparently, a musician trying out for the band said that’s what the song sounded like, and it’s as good a way as any to describe their sound — not exactly country, but old-school psych-pop and post-punk spiked with a shot of decidedly modern creative energy. Recorded two years ago in a two-day marathon session, their debut EP No. 1 is a vibrant snapshot of musical clay taking shape. And if their live show is any indication, their next release is gonna be a sweet-ass vase.

 

“The Craft” from ‘No. 1’ EP out now on Partisan Records and Royal Mountain Records.

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Specializing in the live dissemination and recording of sitarified and psychedelified musical compositions.
Debuting a decade ago, the psych-pop creation of Rishi Dhir along with long-time collaborators Miles Dupire (drums) and Robbie MacArthur (guitar), and touring member Jason Kent (keys/guitar), have released five critically-acclaimed albums, toured extensively throughout North America and Europe, been nominated for the prestigious Polaris Music Prize and picked up praise from the likes of NPR, Brooklyn Vegan, Consequence of Sound, Rolling Stone, Clash Magazine and more. As a highly-regarded sitar player, Dhir has also collaborated with indie-rock icons (Beck) and legendary cult bands (The Brian Jonestown Massacre).

Part 2: Darker Time, Darker Space We can’t believe what is happening. We don’t know what to do. Scientists reveal they have built a spaceship that can take the top candidates for continuing humanity to New Earth. We’ve never been there, but we have heard transmissions that suggest life exists like ours. Who are the lucky ones that get to board starship Harmonia for planet B?

Band Members
Rishi Dhir,
Miles Dupire,
Jason Kent,
Robbie MacArthur,

new album ‘Hollow’ (out 02/14/2020)

It’s hard to classify the sounds of Ada Lea’s “What We Say in Private”, as it mimics the playful intensity of Angel Olsen’s “Shut Up Kiss Me” on opener “mercury” before unraveling into Big Thief–like existential folk on the ensuing “Wild Heart.” The reason for this, perhaps, is Alexandra Levy’s scrapped plan to split the record down the middle between tracks she identified as “sun songs” and those she classified as “moon songs.” The result is a blending of the two on songs like “The Party,” which begins with an inherently lunar acoustic tranquility before the chorus’s glowing ambiance sets in around the two minute mark. More experimental elements shine through across the album via spoken-word postscripts, distorted vocal samples, ambient blips, and—her evident strong suit—lo-fi crescendos, for a truly unique feel.

Montreal, Quebec-based musician Alexandra Levy is also a painter and visual artist, and traces of her many creative abilities run throughout her debut album what we say in private, a beautifully colorful collection of profound pop songs. Throughout, she expresses feelings and thoughts that all humans experience behind closed doors and alone, but are conditioned to keep to themselves. This is reflected in the lyrics, the artwork, and the songs — together forming a public exhibition of deeply private matter. The album is a collection of raw, confessional, and at times messy emotions, presented to a society that can fear such realness, often favoring the uncomplicated, curated, and manicured.

“The Montreal singer-songwriter’s debut album uses heartbreak as the springboard for an innovative brand of indie rock that’s both fiery and introspective.

Ada Lea, what we say in private (Saddle Creek)

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Montrealites Half Moon Run have released their third studio album, ‘A Blemish In The Great Light’, last Friday and it’s chock full of swirling indie rock riffs, at times a throwback to seventies nouveau synth, sometimes the harmonies feeling like an echo of sixties rock and roll. It’s a fresh new take and we like it. Last night they had a sold out headline show at Electric Brixton, and what a beauty it was.

Half Moon Run have returned with their third album, A Blemish In The Great Light, via Glassnote Records. Produced by Joe Chiccarelli (The Strokes, Beck, Killers) and featuring the singles Then Again and Flesh and Blood.

The word everyone comes back to when describing Montreal indie rockers Half Moon Run is “complex” (The Guardian, Exclaim, et al.) Whether they’re billed as dreamy alt-pop, bucolic alt-folk, or psychedelic indie rock, the four multi-instrumentalists – Devon Portielje (vocals, guitar, piano, percussion), Conner Molander (vocals, guitar, keyboard, piano, pedal steel, bass, harmonica), Dylan Phillips (vocals, drums, piano, keyboard), and Isaac Symonds (vocals, drums, mandolin, synth, bass) – have built their name on cerebral, acrobatic arrangements and harmonies that lilt prettily till they turn feral.

This project is funded in part by FACTOR, the Government of Canada and Canada’s private radio broadcasters.

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Feels like yesterday that many of us were just meeting Mitski for the first time, that all-American girl sucking face with her hand while a totally unanticipated grunge-guitar chorus roused us from the somnambulistic acoustic ballad she was wooing us with. It’s a very similar energy that recently also introduced many of us to Common Holly, aka Brigitte Naggar whose “Crazy Ok” follows a very similar trajectory, abruptly escalating from a borderline-twee folk love song to arena-reaching riffs subdued only by an indie-label budget. With little more warning than a blip of harsh electric guitar, the song descends into an utterly chaotic close to Brigitte Naggar’s mostly hushed—though wildly experimental—second album.

“Crazy Ok” from my album ‘When I say to you Black Lightning’ hey what’s this one about? cool have a great day

This week Wolf Parade returned with a brand new single, “Against the Day.” It was shared via a video for the track. It’s the band’s first new song since their 2017 reunion album Cry Cry Cry. The song is out now via Sub Pop Records and you can watch the video below. “Against the Day” features alternating vocals between Dan Boeckner and Spencer Krug and Scorpion Dagger directed the video.

Band Members
Arlen Thompson
Dan Boeckner
Spencer Krug

 

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Common Holly (real name Brigitte Naggar) has come a long away since self-releasing her debut album Playing House back in 2016. It quickly stirred up buzz, helping Brigitte ink a deal with Solitaire Recordings, who gave the album a wider release in 2017, which is when the Montreal artist started to catch on in the U.S. The album’s folk and jazz-pop vibes gained Common Holly more than a few comparisons to fellow Canadian Feist, but on its new followup — and Barsuk Records debut — “When I say to you Black Lightning”, she is taking her sound into much different territories. This time around, the first comparison that comes to mind is Julia Holter, but really she is just continuing to carve a unique space for herself. Instead of folk and jazz-pop, Black Lightning takes Common Holly’s sound in more atmospheric and more experimental art-pop directions than ever before.

It’s both more complex and more gorgeous sounding, and despite it being a more experimental album, it’s just as accessible as the debut. Brigitte herself says the album “documents a period of growth,” and that’s obvious just from listening to it. The album was made over a two-year period, which is sort of a long time in our fast-paced, short-attention-span world, but when you make artistic leaps like Common Holly did on Black Lightning, it’s worth the wait.

Common Holly’s Album “When I say to you Black Lightning” out October 18th.

Corridor Loser Edition LP

Corridor are a group from Montreal and their latest Sub Pop Records debut, “Junior”, was made just yesterday. The rock’n’roll band had barely inked their record deal when they surfed into studio, racing against time to make the most dazzling, immediate and inventive album of their young career: 39 minutes of darting and dodging guitars, spiraling vocal harmonies, and the complicated, goldenrod nostalgia of a Sunday mid-afternoon.

This ain’t Corridor’s first rodeo. Junior is the band’s third full-length and their third recorded with their friend, producer (and occasionally roommate) Emmanuel Ethier. However 2015’s Le Voyage Éternel and 2017’s Supermercado were made languorously, their songs taking shape across whole seasons.

This time Dominic Berthiaume (vocals/bass), Julian Perreault (guitar), Jonathan Robert (vocals/guitar/synths), and Julien Bakvis (drums) permitted themselves no such indulgence. The band were committed to releasing an album every two years, and for Junior it required a blitz. “If you want to release something this fall, we need the masters by the 10th of May,” the label had warned them. Winter was already in its last throes: on March 1, Corridor went into studio; in mid-April, Corridor came out. They had somehow created the album  Junior and it was, if we may be so bold, spectacular.

“Topographe” from the Corridor album Junior (Release Date: October 18, 2019)

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Half Moon Run’s newest single, “Flesh and Blood”, balances gorgeous harmonies with strikingly clean acoustic guitar and honest lyrics. The song is about learning to love someone and learning to accept love, both from yourself and others. The powerful song, from their upcoming album “A Blemish In The Great Light”, perfectly captures the band’s indie rock sound, with foot-tapping guitar and percussion as well as refreshing piano and guitar melodies. Half Moon Run a video to accompany Flesh and Blood on September 16th, which will showcase the band members’ relationships with each other and provide viewers a glimpse at the creative processes used to craft the song and album.

Half Moon Run’s new album, “A Blemish In The Great Light”,

Band Members
Devon Portielje, Conner Molander, Dylan Phillips, Isaac Symonds

Music Video for “Flesh and Blood” by Half Moon Run

photo:  Eric Tschaeppeler

It’s been three years since Montreal’s Elephant Stone released an album — through frontman Rishi Dir was also busy with his psych led supergroup Mein — but are working on the follow-up to Ship of Fools as we speak. That won’t be out till 2020, but they do have a new single that finds the usually jangly band dipping a toe into heavy rock territory. “‘Land of Dead’ began with stoner-rock riff on the sitar; it was pretty quick to write,” Rishi tells us. “Lyrically, I knew it would be the dark centerpiece of a song suite. Working with my friend, and Mien bandmate, John Mark Lapham, we came up with the lyrics telling of a world devoid of empathy and burning skies. It’s tragic how life imitates art.” Crank it up: “Land of Dead” you can listen below.

Elephant Stone are playing Austin’s Levitation festival in November,

“Land Of Dead” (Elephants On Parade/Fuzz Club), out Friday September 20th,