Posts Tagged ‘Brighton’

HARKER – ” Axiom “

Posted: March 26, 2021 in Classic Albums, MUSIC
Tags: , ,

“Axiom’ is a statement of intent, a hit back against the apathy of modern living, an attack on idolisation and a call for all the marginalised to take the helm.

Foundations built upon a love for pop music, while leaning into their obsession over the golden era of dischord records & 90s college fuzz sounds. since 2014, the band have put out releases through well established labels, including their EP ‘A Lifetime Apart’ and their frst full length ‘No Discordance’ which followed in 2018 to critical acclaim – becoming a powerful punk/emo shot to the arm for the UK’s indie scene, seeing the band go on to support the likes of the Wildhearts, Mercy Union & Spanish Love Songs as well as a string of UK and international tours including a successful tour of Japan in 2019.

2021 brings their sophomore effort ‘Axiom’ – recorded by producer Bob Cooper, and mastered by Alan Douches (japandroids liars, frightened rabbit) the new album cuts into the state of modern living, discussing themes on isolation, social class and environmental change. not content with sitting still in their punk-pop bubble and retracing steps, Harker have pushed against the grain with ‘Axiom’ – a middle finger to force fed algorithm produced pop.

This release sees Harker at their most experimental yet, delving into new sonic territories evolving out of the bands earlier radio-popfuzz rooted sound – pulling in more left field infuences, such as sonic youth, jets to brazil & Black Sabbath.

Harker are a 4 piece ’emogaze’ band from Brighton,

Squid are thrilled to announce their debut album , “Bright Green Field”, already one of 2021’s most highly anticipated albums. Bright Green Field, produced by Dan Carey, will be released 7th May. It’s an album of towering scope and ambition, it is deeply considered, paced and intricately constructed. With all band members playing such a vital and equal role, this album is very much the product of five heads operating as one.

Some bands might be tempted to include previous singles on their debut – and the band already released two more in 2020 via Sludge’ and ‘Broadcaster’ – but instead Bright Green Field is completely new. This sense of limitlessness and perpetual forward motion is one of the the key ingredients that makes Squid so loved by fans and critics alike, from BBC Radio 6 Music who have A-Listed previous singles, ‘Houseplants’, ‘The Cleaner’ and ‘Match Bet’ to publications such as, The Guardian, NME, The Face, The Quietus and countless others. The band was also on the longlist for the BBC Music Sound of 2020 poll.

Bright Green Field
features field recordings of ringing church bells, tooting bees, microphones swinging from the ceiling orbiting a room of guitar amps, a distorted choir of 30 voices as well as a horn and string ensemble featuring the likes of, Emma-Jean Thackray and Lewis Evans from Black Country, New Road.

Ahead of the release of their forthcoming debut record, Bright Green Field (due May 7th via Warp Records), the Brighton, UK five-piece Squid have returned with another stellar single, a banger called “Paddling.”

While much of the material off Squid’s impending debut album was written in the studio, “Paddling” has been in their live arsenal for a while. The track leads with blaring, sci-fi synths and pulsing drums, quickening in pace; an upbeat staple that meshes the chaotic but controlled post-punk tendencies the group is known for, while introducing a more intricate facet of their technical abilities. Lyrically, it tackles the sort of dystopian horror Bright Green Field centers around, wondering if we’re all just cogs in a massive, inescapable machine. “Patient, in control/Dig holes like a mole/Patient, oars in stow/Just do what you’re told,” 

“Written from two different perspectives, ‘Paddling’ is a song about the dichotomy between simple pleasures and decadent consumerism,” say the band. “Recounting a familiar scene from The Wind in the Willows, the song reminds us that although we are humans, we are ultimately animals that are driven by both modern and primal instincts, leading to vanity and machismo around us in the everyday.”

Whilst the album title conjures up imagery of pastoral England, in reality, it’s something of a decoy that captures the band’s fondness for paradox and juxtaposition. Within the geography of Bright Green Field lies monolithic concrete buildings and dystopian visions plucked from imagined cities.   

Squid’s
music – be it agitated and discordant or groove-locked and flowing – has often been a reflection of the tumultuous world we live in and this continues that to some extent. “This album has created an imaginary cityscape,” says Ollie Judge, who writes the majority of the lyrics and plays drums. “The tracks illustrate the places, events and architecture that exist within it. Previous projects were playful and concerned with characters, whereas this project is darker and more concerned with place – the emotional depth of the music has deepened.”

These themes were further embedded and emphasised, almost serendipitously, as Judge began to read more. “Reading Douglas Coupland’s view that we’re living in the “Extreme Present” as well as Mark Fisher and Merlin Coverley’s writings on Hauntology and the slow cancellation of the future made me realise we’ve been living in a dystopian and futurist landscape for a long time.”  However, for all the innovative recording techniques, evolutionary leaps, lyrical themes, ideas and narratives that underpin the album, it’s also a joyous and emphatic record. One, that marries the uncertainties of the world with a curious sense of exploration, as it endlessly twists and turns down unpredictable avenues.

Formed in Brighton, Squid is the brainchild of Louis Borlase (Guitars & Vocals), Ollie Judge (Drums & Lead Vocals), Arthur Leadbetter (Keyboards, Strings, Percussion), Laurie Nankivell (Bass & Brass) and Anton Pearson (Guitars & Vocals).

due May 7th via Warp Records

“It’s about the in-between moments.” says Hattie Cooke.
“Bliss Land” is the new LP from Brighton born artist Hattie Cooke. Her third album and debut release for Castles In Space opens up her sound by managing to find a balance between the introspective and the communal. It is an album that looks forward whilst acknowledging the creators past creating a work full of a nostalgia that also feels vitally current. Initially conceived as a soundtrack album, during its creation, “Bliss Land” morphed into a beautiful set of personal songs born out of anticipation, excitement and anxiety.

Speaking about the themes of the albums, Hattie says: “It wasn’t until the album was finished that I realised what it was about. I had recently graduated from university and people were beginning to take more notice of my music. I was excited about the possibilities of the future, but at the same time the immediate future had been put on hold due to the pandemic, so I was frustrated and anxious. And then whenever I think about the future, I can’t help but think about the past and where I’ve come from and what I’ve been through to get to that point. So in some ways it’s a reflective record and in other ways it’s a record full of anticipation. “One Foot Out The Door” is a track that really resonates with me – it’s about that liminal space between the past and the future when you’re on the threshold of something. I think that’s what the album is about, it’s about the in-between moments. “I grew up on a small council estate on the outskirts of Brighton in a house that was full of music. Both my parents played guitar and my dad also bought and sold records for a living. I taught myself the guitar when I was twelve and made plenty of music throughout my teens. At 17, I won a scholarship to study at the British Institute Of Modern Music and continued writing and playing local shows. I also started to learn how to record and produce my own music on GarageBand as a necessary alternative to going into an expensive recording studio. GarageBand has some fantastic synth and electronic drum sounds and that’s when I became more interested in electronic music and music production. In 2015, Third Kind Records approached me after hearing my songs on a homemade demo CD that a friend had passed on. We released my debut album in 2016 and I’ve been making and releasing music ever since.”

Hattie writes, records and produces all her own albums, however she is keen to express how others have helped shaped parts of “Bliss Land”:“The record isn’t a completely solo effort, I had people along the way to help shape this album into what it became, although I had complete artistic freedom to let the album grow into what it wanted to be. I had invaluable help from Dom Keen who helped me mix the album. We spent a good number of nights in his studio drinking gin and trying to get everything just right. He did things to the music that I would never have even considered doing. I had no idea what compression really was until the making of this record, which probably sounds mad considering I’ve produced three records but when you’re self-taught you can miss out learning about so much! Antony Ryan’s mastering added a whole new dimension to the record as well.”

“Bliss Land” is an album soaked in the outer edges of pop music making it a cohesive and beautiful album full of dense textures held together by Hattie’s unique voice. It’s an album that will undoubtedly chime with a cross section of audiences. So where does Hattie see her music in the landscape of the current UK electronic scene? “There’s a lot of instrumental/soundtrack music coming out of the scene, a lot of synthwave music which seems to be a real throwback to the 70s and early 80s. I think that’s because so much of the music coming out of the scene is made by those who grew up during those decades. So I think I’m a bit of an outlier when it comes to the UK electronic scene for two reasons. Firstly, I’m at the lower end of the age range and secondly, I’m a woman in an extremely male dominated scene. “Bliss Land” is intentionally quite poppy, which seems to be less in fashion at the moment whereas my other instrumental stuff is more inspired by classical music than by IDM or ambient music, so I think I’m coming at writing and producing from a slightly different angle. However, I still definitely feel part of the scene. There’s a particularly strong sense of community within the UK electronic scene on Twitter and I’ve been nothing but welcomed and supported by the artists, fans and labels. It’s like being part of a strange and wonderful family.”

You’ve made a video for the track “Youth” with Chris Standley from Rogue Robot which is both funny and shot through with real melancholy. “Youth” is about reflecting on the past. I turned thirty this year and sometimes (more than I’d like to admit) I worry that I’ve gotten more boring as I’ve gotten older. I was pretty wild and unhinged when I was younger and sometimes I miss those mad nights out where it felt like absolutely anything could happen – although saying that I just don’t have the energy to stay up for three days or the stomach to cope with the hangovers anymore. Still, there are days when I miss the way that everything feels new and exciting when you’re in your late teens/early twenties – everything is more intense when you’re younger and the world around you seems bright and buzzing with life. I’ve been thinking about it a lot this past year. I’ve not had much to do for the last twelve months besides walk around on my own and reflect on the past, since the future has basically been put on indefinite hold, so that has almost certainly fed into some of the lyrics and maybe even the feel of the music.”

The album is already garnering a lot of attention and praise. What’s next for Hattie after the album is released? “Who knows what’s next! I have plans to tour the album when the world opens up again. I’d also love to have the chance to score a film or to work with some other artists doing guest vocals or some remixes. And I’d like to get back to doing some music-related charity work again as my family were supported by a number of charities when I was growing up and think it’s important to give back when you can.

Cocteau Twins, former CT bassist Simon Raymonde and Richie Thomas of Dif Juz are gearing up to release their second Lost Horizons albums, In Quiet Moments, on February 26th via Bella Union Records. It’s a double and packed with notable guest vocalists to help them achieve their cinematic vision. The terrific first half, which came out digitally back in November, features guest vocals from John Grant, Porridge Radio, Penelope Isles, former Midlake frontman Tim Smith and more, while Pt 2 features Marissa Nadler, Ural Thomas, The Innocence Mission’s Karen Peris, and more.

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As you’d expect from two men who released records during the ’80s arty heyday of 4AD, the artwork is as important as the music itself. The packaging for the Deluxe Edtion vinyl of In Quiet Moments is especially lovely and comes on ocean blue and green vinyl, with a wide-spinned sleeve on uncoated/reverse board and is housed in a cool PVC outer sleeve with printed text. (There’s also a sticker, for those looking to cover logos on your laptop or decorating your fridge.) We’ve got a special edition in our store where the first 100 orders come with an art print postcard signed by Simon Raymonde.  

While we wait for the whole thing to drop, you can listen toIn Quiet Moments Part 1 now along with the Marissa Nadler song, “Marie,” from Part 2:

Releases February 26th, 2021

Nancy Brighton based is a one-man, psych-pop delight. The B3SCI Records signee channels the glam-rock swagger David Bowie in his recent five-track EP “Happy Oddities”, which spawned the seriously catchy single “Call Me On Your Telephone”. Nancy could well be my favourite new artist!.

Last year was not normal so why try be normal? Warping into psychedelia land from the ashes of Brighton band Tigercub, two EP’s in and he’s nailed it with a mini album that drags you into an Alice In Wonderland of wobbly warped sound that is weird and wonderful as fuck.

He explains…“7ft Blues is bi-polar”, Nancy explains. “The tracklist swings from suicidal, to cartoonishly happy, to self-deprecating, back to Alan Partridge pretentious (my spiritual home)… I think it’s a full portrait of me in that particular moment of my life, warts an’all. Before Nancy my main thing was writing songs for a rock band called Tigercub. In Tigercub I feel I had a tendency to hide my true self under a borrowed alt-rock, slacker introversion. It’s a pose that is easy to adopt and can easily trick you into a false sense of security when expressing yourself, wearing Kurt Cobain’s angst as a mask if you will. Striking out on my own has given me nowhere to look but inside, I think with 7ft Blues I’m really being myself, I’m actually talking about me now, what it’s like to be me, and I have never done that before, and it’s terrifying”.

He returned with a new song, the scuzzy foot-stomping “7 Foot Tall Post-Suicidal Feel Good Blues”, in November, followed up by the outstandingly brooding “Pleasure Pen”, further solidifying his status as an artist you need to be on board with. Detailing his cut, the enigmatic figure explained: “‘Pleasure Pen’ is based on the Sacher – Masoch novella Venus in Furs, it’s dark and dirty and needs to be listened to whilst engulfed in red light. Break out those assless chaps cos it’s about to get disgusting”.

“In the past I had an anxiety to make everything as immediate and explosive as possible, which I think is cool but being fearless in what you do and having courage in your convictions is way cooler”,said Nancy You can’t argue with that.

“Don’t Pass Me By” is back in Bolan territory, an amazingly written glam tune that has a killer chorus which floats in and out. A spine tingling piece of work full of fuzz and some great guitar work that has hints of Santana without the noodling bollocks. Class.  Clic Clac is a speeded up lo-fi bit of madness with dark lyrics I presume are about suicide? I may be wrong. It’s a fuck off slab of pysch madness that resonates. Psycho Vision is an acid tinged slice of madness yet again. Insane whistling, loads of fucking about with that wobbling sounding. It like listening to glam rock when you’ve necked 100 mushies and having a 50/50 good/bad trip.

I keep thinking a clown’s gonna fucking jump me from behind the telly! Deathmarch ends the album in style. He’s defintely influenced by Mark Lanegan on this one. Funereal keyboards with some great guitars and dark lyrics of the end of your life. An excellent foreboding track that is dark yet sounds fuckin’ massive. A song that Lanegan would easily put his name on if he heard it. 

We hope! A great album that raises the bar.

Yonaka

Brighton based Yonaka have returned with their fiery self-produced new single “Seize The Power”. Yonaka have released ‘Seize The Power’, which was self-produced by the four-piece and features spoken-word vocals from lead singer Theresa Jarvis, 

The band’s new single follows last year’s Yonaka “Stripped Back” EP, and marks their first new material since their 2019 debut album Don’t Wait ‘Til Tomorrow. “It’s been so long since we released new music and the time has finally come; this is a new chapter for us,” the band said about ‘Seize The Power’. “We want you to get lost in a feeling of strength and empowerment when listening to this song.”

Yonaka say of their new outing, “We are so excited for the world to hear “Seize The Power”. It’s been so long since we released new music and the time has finally come; this is a new chapter for us. We want you to get lost in a feeling of strength and empowerment when listening to this song.”

“Seize The Power” is out now on Creature Records via Believe Music

See the source image

Royal Blood have today shared “Trouble’s Coming”, the rock duo’s first new track since releasing their 2017 album “How Did We Get So Dark?”.

Serving as a sample of the Brighton band’s forthcoming third LP, “Trouble’s Coming” adds a bit of glitz to their grit. It pulls in influences from Daft Punk and Justice, turning Royal Blood’s usually hammering sound into something much groovier. According to the band, the muscular dance floor style of the song set the groundwork for the rest of their new LP.
Said vocalist/bassist Mike Kerr in a statement,

“It was the moment something started to click — where we started playing over those much more rigid dance beats. The breakthrough was realizing that there was real common ground between that and what we’d done before. It’s that AC/DC aspect: where the quality that makes the riffs seem so cutting is because of that beat. Although on the surface we were stepping outside what we’d done before, it didn’t feel at all unnatural; it felt like we were returning to music we’d loved from the very beginning: Daft Punk, Justice, things that were really groove-orientated. It was all about the beat. It felt like familiar territory, but something we’d censored in ourselves.”

blues-rocking sons continue to stoke the fires of anticipation for their new album (due on sale 30th April) – this time with a strutting, boot-stomping groove so addictive it can’t possibly be good for you. Expect fuzz and sass by the caseload. If Josh Homme and Muse got stuck in a disco together, they’d have come up with something like this. How tasty does that sound?

Winter Gardens - Tapestry 180g Ltd Ed Marble Magenta 12

Taking influence from 80’s post-punk, Factory & Creation era bands, Winter Gardens have developed their own ‘dream-punk’ sound, with all the ethereal haze of shoegaze & dream-pop combined with the energy of punk.

Based out of East Sussex, Winter Gardens caught the ear of many back in 2020 with their debut EP, “Tapestry”. While there are no plans announced for this year yet, it was a collection of tracks that hinted at a band with a very bright future. Released through Austerity Records, a new socially-conscious independent record label part-owned by the band’s guitarist Jamie Windless, Tapestry is a record heavily influenced by the 80’s indie sounds of labels like Creation and 4AD, bands who fused the worlds of dream-pop and the rawness of punk

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Across its four tracks, “Tapestry” incorporates moments of lush introspection, such as the Lanterns On The Lake-like title track, as well as moments of ferocious energy, with the excellently titled Zigzanny, reminiscent of The Joy Formidable. Even if no further new music arrives this year, I can only hope 2021 gives the band the opportunity to take this record out to the live environment, and having already played with the likes of Penelope Isles and Say Sue Me, that’s something well worth being very excited about.

New Year, New Lockdown, New Single.“Believer” is coming out soon, We are so excited to share our new song and video with you all! We filmed the video back in the summer of 2019 and have been wanting to show you for aaaages! Black Honey have released their first offering of 2021, new single, ‘Believer’.

‘Believer’, taken from the Brighton-based band’s upcoming second album ‘Written and Directed’, set for release on March 19th, follows the previous ‘I Like The Way You Die’, and is a foot-stomping, cathartic outing. “’Believer’ is a song to accompany your existential crisis,” she explains. “I wanted a religious satire that was eye rolling at all the patriarchal nonsense of spiritual sense of self. I wanna believe in me, the outsider and the underdog. It’s like coming of age, coming out and coming up.”

The accompanying video is set in a dusty, deserted Mexican village, with a ‘dead behind the eyes’ Izzy B. Phillips.

It features the final performance from our beloved Tom Dewhurst, nuns, the desert, a beautiful drag queen and kidnapping. Everything you’d want from a Black Honey video: Set to appear on the band’s upcoming album ‘Written & Directed’, the band’s first release of the year features percussive acoustic guitars, reverb-drenched surf guitar and brass. Speaking of the new LP, lead singer and guitarist Izzy B. Phillips said that she “made this record for young women to feel invincible”.

Written & Directed, the new album released March 19th

Dana Margolin really has a way with words. She likes to roll them ’round and ’round until the meaning flakes off and there’s nothing but feeling left. With their debut record five years in the making, the Brighton collective provided us with an unusual take on somewhat-anachronistic indie, shaped by Dana Margolin’s quaking, often unpredictable vocal delivery. All the memorable peaks on “Every Bad” are characterized by Margolin’s unreliable insistence that, say, “everything’s fine,” while the jarring opener climaxes and ebbs with the repeated, impossibly tense line “Thank you for making me happy.” I don’t think you could possibly adapt the “This is fine.” meme more fluently into song writing.

As many of us have followed them around for years, we predicted big things for these Brighton locals but we never suspected they had something quite this special in them.

Songwriter Dana Margolin’s vulnerability has been her constant strength and despite the nuanced and difficult subjects she takes on in her songs, she’s always had some level of lo-fi production or guitar fuzz to shield her, thanks to the bedroom pop genesis of most of these tracks. however, on ‘every bad’, she unabashedly centres herself and the result is astounding. That’s not to say that the guitar fuzz and lo-fi production have vanished – far from it in fact. ‘Every Bad’ takes cues from nirvana, who mastered underpinning anxiety with abrasion, raincoats in their tendency to twist, turn and change a song without warning and pixies in their ability to turn the aggression of grunge into a diverse and supple sound. so yes, they are clearly inspired by the bands of their youth but on these familiar foundations, something uniquely dynamic has been built. the jagged instrumentation complements dana’s rugged vocals and authentic lyrics perfectly, matching the mood of each song and manoeuvring effortlessly to enhance a lyricist who tackles sensitive, esoteric and existential subjects.

On opener “Born Confused” the singer chants “Thank you for making me happy” for a minute and a half. It starts off a little wistful, then genuine. With about 40 seconds left the edges start to wobble and the mantra becomes a frenzied wash of anguish. By the time the song cuts out, mid-sentence, it sounds like an accusation, if not an attack.

She told Apple Music that the track “captures the feeling of frustration and trying to figure things out”, which is maybe the core of Every Bad. It’s full of direct contradictions, cocksure one second and confused the next. It does an incredible job of transmitting the anxiety of being in your mid-20s. I’m an adult, why am I still adrift? “Oh, I don’t know what I want/But I know what I want/Oh, I don’t know what I want/But…”. Despite this vulnerability, dana never softens her edges or compromises in her lyrics. her pronounced and very forthright uncertainty and confusion comes across as defined and unflinching – the only thing she can be certain of is that confusion. this is not music that moralises or offers answers to life’s big questions – it is here to express raw emotional response with no interest in resolution.
That refusal to offer an easy way out is what makes it both so personal and so relatable. we may not have experienced the same situations, but we’ve felt those same nameless, onerous emotions. these guttural anthems amass into a defining album that’s burst them out of their established Brighton bubble, got them mercury nominated and has firmly planted them in hearts everywhere.

‘Sweet’ by Porridge Radio, taken from their forthcoming album Every Bad released in March . The DIY Brighton outfit were called ‘slacker indie’ when they released their first full album. “Every Bad” shows that description had more to do with the garage they recorded it in than their motivation.