Posts Tagged ‘Partisan Records’

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Craig Finn is the front man of The Hold Steady, however he also an incredible singer-songwriter in his own right. His new solo album is called “I Need A New War”. It is Craig’s third solo record on Partisan Records (his fourth overall) and it cements him as one of today’s most vital storytellers, among the ranks of Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits.

I Need A New War feels like another confident step forward from Craig. He tells the stories of people on the margins, focusing on characters who are lost and who have been left behind. There is nothing glamorous about their stories, it is a very “daytime” portrait of these characters. These are also the least American-specific songs that Craig has ever written.

Finn tells us “I Need A New War” is out today. I’m super proud of this record and I owe a ton of gratitude to a bunch of people who got it here. Josh Kaufman is beyond a producer on this music, he’s a co-collaborator and a spiritual guide. He’s become hugely important to me in the past five years. Life changing, actually. Joe Russo brought his spectacular musical sense to another record with me. His percussion playing and input brought so much life to this music. D. James Goodwin engineered, mixed and hosted at The Isokon and made it all sound incredible.

Stuart Bogie added so much emotion with his soulful sax playing and Raymond Mason & Dave Nelson rounded out the amazing horn section. Annie Nero & Cassandra Jenkins sound so fantastic singing together and their backup vocals are a major defining part of this record. Sam Kassirer played the piano that classes up the whole thing. Dave Gardner mastered elegantly. Dan Monick took the rad cover photo again and Vance Wellenstein put the artwork together. Partisan Records allowed all of this to happen.

I love each and every one of these people. Thank you all for being a part of it and thank you to everyone who listens.

Craig Finn & The We All Want The Same Things Band performing “Carmen Isn’t Coming In Today” live at the Murmrr Theatre in Brooklyn, NY. “Carmen Isn’t Coming In Today” A track from Craig Finn’s new album ‘I Need A New War’ out April 26th on Partisan Records

The We All Want The Same Things Band features Stuart Bogie, Cassandra Jenkins, Sam Kassirer, Josh Kaufman, Raymond Mason, Annie Nero, Joe Russo, and Jon Shaw

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With only two EPs and some stray singles, grungy LA four-piece Goon have garnered a devoted fanbase and compelling sound. They released Happy Omen back in 2017, following their debut EP Dusk Of Punk the previous year. Goon have now shared a new single, “Datura” and a glitched out, saturated Vinyl Williams-directed music video.

“Datura” is heavier than Goon’s classic ’90s-indebted rock, but preserves their lo-fi fuzz. “This song isn’t really about any one thing. It touches a lot of different weird ideas,” singer and guitarist Kenny Becker says in a statement.

The original melodic idea for the song was just to make a tune that had a chorus with a bass line that revolved around three notes, only half-steps apart. The rest of the song moves around quite a bit and I’ve always really liked that contrast.

I wanted to have the chorus never use any repeating phrases, which led to stream-of-consciousness style lyrics. Because of that, this song isn’t really about any one thing. It touches a lot of different weird ideas. Like datura flowers that grew in the canyon near the house that I grew up in, or questioning the effectiveness of praying for god to take away stomach pain of an old friend.

“The original melodic idea for the song was just to make a tune that had a chorus with a bass line that revolved around three notes, only half-steps apart. The rest of the song moves around quite a bit and I’ve always really liked that contrast.

I wanted to have the chorus never use any repeating phrases, which led to sorta stream-of-consciousness style lyrics. Because of that, this song isn’t really about any one thing. It sorta touches a lot of different weird ideas. Like datura flowers that grew in the canyon near the house that I grew up in, or questioning the effectiveness of praying for god to take away stomach pain of an old friend.”

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Band Members
Kenny Becker , Drew Eccleston, Christian Koons, Caleb Wicker

released March 21st, 2019

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Irish post-punk outfit Fontaines D.C. recently announced the details of their highly anticipated debut album, “Dogrel” out April 12th via Partisan Records. With singles like “Too Real,” “Chequeless Reckless” and “Big,” already out there.  Fontaines D.C. make brisk, snappy post-punk with the heart of a lion. You shouldn’t write off frontman Grian Chatten’s speak-sing vocals—he packs just as much gritty ardor into his impassioned, poetic proclamations as throaty punk howlers.

Here’s the video for ‘Roy’s Tune’ from our forthcoming album ‘Dogrel’ out April 12th.

“Roy’s Tune” by Fontaines D.C.

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The fourth single, but first on new home Partisan Records from the much loved at Rough Trade shops Fontaines D.C. They band met as a quintet in Dublin, influenced and driven in equal measure by the rich history of their hometown’s counter-culture, their response has been to make concise and immediately authentic indie-punk that has done anything but fall on deaf ears.

The last six months have seen Fontaines D.C. release three hotly received double A-side singles, both of which were named as singles of the week by Rough Trade, and garnered early support from the likes of Steve Lamacq and others on BBC 6 Music, as well as earning feature space from every major Irish publication.

Too Real is another masterclass in repetition. It employs hypnotic, kraut-rock infused cyclical riffs, whilst channelling Dublin into their concise and often-unassumingly poetic lyrics with a distinctive gritty Irish drawl. The flip The Cuckoo is a Callin’ is a more straight ahead pop nugget but equally as engaging.

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Irish post-punk outfit Fontaines D.C. have announced the details of their highly anticipated debut album, Dogrel, along with the lead single and accompanying video, “Big.” Dogrel will be released on April 12th via Partisan Records.

Following the release of singles like “Too Real” and “Chequeless Reckless,” “Big” is a brisk, snappy post-punk tune with the heart of a lion. You shouldn’t write off frontman Grian Chatten’s speak-sing vocals—he packs just as much gritty ardor into his impassioned, poetic proclamations as throaty punk howlers.

Speaking about the Molly Keane-directed video, the band commented, “We felt that great ambition was a sickness, and we got Grian’s 11-year next-door neighbour to say it to you all because he’s got the presence of a hundred frontmen.” According to the band, Dogrel’s title is an ode to their roots and the album is unapologetically Irish. They wrote on Twitter, “Dogrel is a crude, traditionally Irish working-class form of verse, historically looked down upon by literary critics.”

In addition to their sold-out U.K. tour in April, Fontaines will support Idles in North America in May, and embark on a European and U.K. headlining tour in November. They will also make appearances at festivals like SXSW, End Of The Road and more.

‘Big’ is taken from the forthcoming debut LP ‘Dogrel’ by Fontaines D.C. Out April 12th 2019 via Partisan Records.

We’re releasing a brand new song today to celebrate the announcement of a brand new record called “Me You They We”, out on April 5th! This album is the culmination of an 18 month process of releasing singles as we’ve written them. Please enjoy “Just My Luck”.

It’s the band’s fourth studio album since debut Alright You Restless in 2011, which was followed by Divisionary in 2014 and Something to Ruin in 2016. As with the last two albums, Me You They We is on Partisan Records.

A “statement of purpose” from the band, Me You They We promises to pull no punches and not shy away from confronting our modern state of ennui. The album was recorded largely at Oberdorfer’s home studio, with occasional guest vocals and appearances, including from the band’s newest member, Lizzy Rose Allen. Perry and Oberdorfer describe their latest effort as one benefiting from slow, methodical work and “complete control over the sessions,” free from the chaos of the street. In the end, they hope the album sparks a sense of resilience and hope.

“We just want to make good music,” Oberdorfer says. “And we want to be real with other people who want to be real. We want to challenge ourselves and our friends to break down barriers as much as we can to lead each other back to sanity.”

To that end, we present “Just My Luck,” is a bouncy but slightly macabre sounding track that fills the room with nuanced, ethereal harmonies, spacey keys and the tiniest bit of irresistible xylophone. Perry’s delicate vocal is front and center, but it gets some key support from his compatriots as the song swells to its big conclusion, where crashing cymbals put an exclamation point on the proceedings. Oberdorfer notes that the song proved to be something of a bear in the studio, being “discarded and reinvented” 14 times before the final version came together.

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Band Members
Tim Perry,
Rob Oberdorfer,
Sarah Riddle,
Colin Jenkins,
Annie Bethancourt,

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Currently in the studio working on the follow-up to 2018’s best album Joy As An Act Of Resistance could we really get a new album from the Bristolian boundary breakers in 2019? Despite a ludicrous touring schedule it appears that they are aiming to follow the pattern of 2017’s Brutalism and the aforementioned Joy… by squeezing this another album out before the close of the year. ,

We are We are big fans of Idles here and not just because they are from Bristol! Its been brilliant to watch all their hard work pay off and hopefully this record will see them fully appreciated as the great band they are on record and especially live!. Idles – Joy As An Act Of Resistance 

‘Samaritans’ from ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance.’ out 31st August 2018 on Partisan Records.

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Continuing the recent glut of exciting new Australian bands is Body Type, the only surprise is that they’re from Sydney rather than the musical hot-bed of Melbourne. The debut Body Type EP is out next month, and ahead of its release the band have this week shared their latest single, Palms.

Lead vocalist, Sophie McComish explains the idea behind the track, “Palms comes from observing moments of concatenation, when everything in your life lines up in a way that feels like the universe is trying to tell you something”. Musically, there’s a winning blend of dream-pop haze and garage energy, the whole track bounces on one of the year’s most thrilling drum beats, pounding out as guitars and vocal melodies entwine and dance together. It might be a track about fate, yet listening to Body Type their destiny is surely in their own hands: this is a band on the verge of something very special.

This video was filmed in the Blue Mountains region. Body Type would like to acknowledge the Darug and Gundungurra people, who are the Traditional Custodians of this land. We pay our respects to Elders past, present and emerging, and acknowledge that sovereignty has never been ceded

Band Members
Sophie Mccomish (guitar + vox) Annabel Blackman (guitar + vox) Georgia Wilkinson-Derums (bass + vox)  Cecil Coleman (drums)

Body Type EP is out October 19th via Partisan Records.

thanks fortherabbits.

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In the short time since they released their acclaimed debut record, ‘Sore,’ Dilly Dally toured the world and took the press by storm, only to nearly collapse under the weight of their own success and call it quits forever. Rising from the ashes with more power and conviction than ever before, the Toronto rockers’ new album is, appropriately enough, titled ‘Heaven,’ and it’s a fierce, fiery ode to optimism, a distortion-soaked battle cry for hope and beauty in a world of darkness and doubt. Frontwoman Katie Monks describes the songs as coping mechanisms, and the collection does indeed form something of a survival kit for hard times, but even more than that, it’s a declaration of faith in the power of music and a burning reminder that we need not wait until the afterlife for things to get better.

 Recorded with producer Rob Schnapf (Elliott Smith, Beck), ‘Heaven’ highlights Dilly Dally’s rough edges in all their ragged glory, drawing every potent ounce of energy from the foursome’s swampy tones, raspy vocals, and volatile rhythm section. While the music is undeniably ferocious, there’s uplift woven into the fabric of every track. ‘Heaven’ opens with the dreamy “I Feel Free,” which begins as a floating, untethered soundscape before transforming into a soaring anthem for a world that’s ready to finally turn the page on all the darkness and disillusion the last few years have wrought.

The inexorable “Believe” insists on self-confidence, while the driving “Sober Motel” celebrates the lucidity a clear mind, and the lilting “Sorry Ur Mad” makes a case for releasing yourself from the prisons of anger and resentment. Escape is a frequent goal—from the bruising “Marijuana” to the epic queer tragedy of “Bad Biology”—but it ultimately solves very little, at least in any permanent way, and so the album carves out its own atheistic religion to get through the day, a faith that validates our pain as real but responds with a beaming light of hope (and maybe a little bit of weed).

Monks and guitarist Liz Ball originally formed the band in high school after bonding over a shared love for explosive, grungy rock and roll. By the time they recorded their debut, the pair had fleshed out the lineup with bassist Jimmy Tony and drummer Benjamin Reinhartz and hit a blistering stride that floored critics on both sides of the Atlantic. Rolling Stone hailed ‘Sore’ as a “blazing” breakout that “sounds like an unleashed id with a sick distortion pedal,” while Fader said it “hits that ever-elusive sweetspot between total recklessness and sly control,” and Pitchfork raved that the record “oozes with female desire” and offers up “a heavy swagger redolent of some of the best ever alt-rock.” In the UK, The Guardian praised the band’s “bludgeoning bass, gnarly guitars and red-raw vocals,” and The Line Of Best Fit dubbed it “a seminal first album.” The music earned Dilly Dally dates with Grouplove, METZ, and Fat White Family in addition to their first-ever international headline tour and festival appearances from Osheaga to Field Day.

“Doom” from Dilly Dally’s new album ‘Heaven’ out now!

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Joe Talbot, the frontman of the Bristol-based post-punk band Idles, isn’t interested in appointing himself a spokesperson of the people. The music that he and his band make a tense and explosive form of protest delivered with both absurdist humor and deeply personal vulnerability doesn’t exist to prop up political candidates. Which doesn’t mean that he’s not above taking the piss out of the political right; “The best way to scare a Tory is to read and get rich,” he chants on “Mother,” the standout single from the band’s debut album Brutalism.

For IDLES, the personal is very much political, and vice versa. The self-released Brutalism was a DIY success story, building up a cult fan-base through word of mouth and an accessible balance of aggressive music with wit and vulnerability. It’s an ass-kicker of a record, and one with its share of quotable one-liners—though some genuine grief lies at the heart of it. “Mother,” ostensibly a statement of feminism, was inspired by Talbot’s own mother, who died shortly before the album was released.

‘Great’ from ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance.’ out 31st August 2018 on Partisan Records.

Idles’ new album, Joy as an Act of Resistance., likewise catalyzes lived experiences into occasionally acerbic and often hilarious statements about the world around them. Talbot, guitarists Mark Bowen and Lee Kiernan, bassist Adam Devonshire, and drummer Jon Beavis sound like they’re having the time of their lives, even when taking bigots to task or opening up about heavier, more heartbreaking experiences. The album title itself is a good summary of what drives IDLES—they’re not moralizing, but helping to win people over to a more open-minded way of thinking through compassionate yet furious anthems, spiked with a potent dose of biting humor.

“I just have an interest in life,” Talbot says over the phone from the UK’s Bestival. “I love music and I love playing music, so I’m not going to not have fun doing it. Humour is a very inclusive vehicle to have a discussion about savage issues. I’m not trying to lecture people I’m trying to open dialogues.”

Joy as an Act of Resistance. is as good-natured and warm-hearted as heavy, aggressive music gets, its twelve tracksputting a clever and fun spin on topics ranging from toxic male behavior (“Samaritans”) to immigration (“Danny Nedelko”). And Talbot’s never afraid to let absurdity take over, as when he indulges in a bit of chest-puffery in “Colossus”—“I put homophobes in coffins…I’m like Evel Knievel, I break bones for my people”—or the parade of insults in “Never Fight a Man with a Perm”: “You look like a walking thyroid, you’re not a man you’re a gland, you’re one big neck with sausage hands.”

Just as with the making of Brutalism, however, the shadows of some much heavier life experiences hang heavy over Joy. Both Kiernan and Talbot have been open about their experiences with addiction, with Talbot himself having stopped drinking cold turkey at the beginning of 2018. And during the process of making the album, Talbot and his partner were preparing to be parents. Their daughter died during childbirth, and that anguish is echoed in the heartbreaking track “June”: “Baby shoes for sale / Never worn.”

In order to move forward as a band as well as to become the people that they wanted to be, Idles needed to address their own personal struggles, whether that meant therapy or acknowledging their own addictive behaviors.

IDLES are a political band, but their politics seem to boil down to some pretty simple principles: 1) Self-improvement and 2) advocating to make life better for individuals in order to make life better for everyone. Which would explain why they’re not interested in getting wrapped up in campaigning or endorsing candidates. As Talbot puts it, empathy and compassion are ideas that shouldn’t be taken advantage of by people in power.