Posts Tagged ‘Idles’

At the end of last year, Idles the band completed a 90 date tour around the US, UK and Europe, with a spectacular show at Le Bataclan in Paris on December 3rd, 2018. The entire gig was filmed and recorded, and is now available to pre-order on CD, digital, and three different colored versions of the album, each with different artwork! The vinyl features a double LP, gatefold packaging, and contains a beautiful booklet designed by lead singer Joe Talbot, with photographs from the show and poems.

From Joe: “That show was nothing short of catharsis and nothing more than love. We love what we do and the people who have carried us here, “Our show at Bataclan was the end of a very long journey for us. On that tour we learnt so much about ourselves, each other and the audiences we have grown with over the past 10 years. That show was nothing short of catharsis and nothing more than love. We love what we do and the people who have carried us here, there was no hiding that at Bataclan and we are so very grateful that the moment was captured in all its glory, love and fatigue. Long live the open minded and long live the moment.” – Joe Talbot

The track “Mother” (Live at Le Bataclan) from the new album ‘A Beautiful Thing: IDLES Live at Le Bataclan‘ released on Partisan Records on 6th December 2019.
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Currently in the studio working on the follow-up to 2018’s best album Joy As An Act Of Resistance could we really get a new album from the Bristolian boundary breakers in 2019? Despite a ludicrous touring schedule it appears that they are aiming to follow the pattern of 2017’s Brutalism and the aforementioned Joy… by squeezing this another album out before the close of the year. ,

We are We are big fans of Idles here and not just because they are from Bristol! Its been brilliant to watch all their hard work pay off and hopefully this record will see them fully appreciated as the great band they are on record and especially live!. Idles – Joy As An Act Of Resistance 

‘Samaritans’ from ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance.’ out 31st August 2018 on Partisan Records.

IDLES – ” Live On KEXP “

Posted: December 2, 2018 in MUSIC
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Going to see Bristol-based band Idles is just like going to a good therapy session. Sure, the show is louder than a traditional therapy session may be, but it’s probably just as inspiring, if not more so. Singer Joe Talbot leads the band in what has become their signature sound: seemingly angry yet incredibly uplifting punk rock. It’s not just a show, it’s an experience. Idles invite audience members on stage to sing, dance and even play instruments. They lead stage dives and give little nuggets of wisdom, all while playing music full of social and political commentary. The smaller the venue, the better for an Idles show—the intimacy makes you feel like not just a fan, but also a friend.

IDLES performing live in the KEXP studio. Recorded October 4th, 2018.

Songs: Colossus Never Fight A Man With A Perm Television Danny Nedelko

Idles’ 2017 debut Brutalism proved to be a DIY breakthrough. The UK band’s intense, socially conscious yet frequently snarky first set spread quickly via word of mouth, on the strength of tracks like the powerful “Mother.” Their follow-up not only lives up to that outstanding debut but builds on it, expanding their sound while exploring topics ranging from the personal to the political. On the single “Danny Nedelko,” they shout-out a friend of the band in a pro-immigrant anthem, while “Colossus” is as imposing and intense as they’ve ever sounded, all with the promise of putting homophobes in coffins. Idles are the kind of band that can make heavy, loud sounds feel like a much-needed dose of comfort in troubled times, and Joy As An Act of Resistance has arrived just when we need it most.

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Joe Talbot, the frontman of the Bristol-based post-punk band Idles, isn’t interested in appointing himself a spokesperson of the people. The music that he and his band make a tense and explosive form of protest delivered with both absurdist humor and deeply personal vulnerability doesn’t exist to prop up political candidates. Which doesn’t mean that he’s not above taking the piss out of the political right; “The best way to scare a Tory is to read and get rich,” he chants on “Mother,” the standout single from the band’s debut album Brutalism.

For IDLES, the personal is very much political, and vice versa. The self-released Brutalism was a DIY success story, building up a cult fan-base through word of mouth and an accessible balance of aggressive music with wit and vulnerability. It’s an ass-kicker of a record, and one with its share of quotable one-liners—though some genuine grief lies at the heart of it. “Mother,” ostensibly a statement of feminism, was inspired by Talbot’s own mother, who died shortly before the album was released.

‘Great’ from ‘Joy as an Act of Resistance.’ out 31st August 2018 on Partisan Records.

Idles’ new album, Joy as an Act of Resistance., likewise catalyzes lived experiences into occasionally acerbic and often hilarious statements about the world around them. Talbot, guitarists Mark Bowen and Lee Kiernan, bassist Adam Devonshire, and drummer Jon Beavis sound like they’re having the time of their lives, even when taking bigots to task or opening up about heavier, more heartbreaking experiences. The album title itself is a good summary of what drives IDLES—they’re not moralizing, but helping to win people over to a more open-minded way of thinking through compassionate yet furious anthems, spiked with a potent dose of biting humor.

“I just have an interest in life,” Talbot says over the phone from the UK’s Bestival. “I love music and I love playing music, so I’m not going to not have fun doing it. Humour is a very inclusive vehicle to have a discussion about savage issues. I’m not trying to lecture people I’m trying to open dialogues.”

Joy as an Act of Resistance. is as good-natured and warm-hearted as heavy, aggressive music gets, its twelve tracksputting a clever and fun spin on topics ranging from toxic male behavior (“Samaritans”) to immigration (“Danny Nedelko”). And Talbot’s never afraid to let absurdity take over, as when he indulges in a bit of chest-puffery in “Colossus”—“I put homophobes in coffins…I’m like Evel Knievel, I break bones for my people”—or the parade of insults in “Never Fight a Man with a Perm”: “You look like a walking thyroid, you’re not a man you’re a gland, you’re one big neck with sausage hands.”

Just as with the making of Brutalism, however, the shadows of some much heavier life experiences hang heavy over Joy. Both Kiernan and Talbot have been open about their experiences with addiction, with Talbot himself having stopped drinking cold turkey at the beginning of 2018. And during the process of making the album, Talbot and his partner were preparing to be parents. Their daughter died during childbirth, and that anguish is echoed in the heartbreaking track “June”: “Baby shoes for sale / Never worn.”

In order to move forward as a band as well as to become the people that they wanted to be, Idles needed to address their own personal struggles, whether that meant therapy or acknowledging their own addictive behaviors.

IDLES are a political band, but their politics seem to boil down to some pretty simple principles: 1) Self-improvement and 2) advocating to make life better for individuals in order to make life better for everyone. Which would explain why they’re not interested in getting wrapped up in campaigning or endorsing candidates. As Talbot puts it, empathy and compassion are ideas that shouldn’t be taken advantage of by people in power.

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IDLES have confirmed details for the follow up to last year’s excellent debut album Brutalism. The much anticipated record is titled Joy as an Act of Resistance, and will be out August 31st via Partisan Records. It takes aim at everything from toxic masculinity, nationalism, immigration, and class inequality – all the while maintaining a visceral, infectious positivity.

The Bristol band have also shared the album’s first single, a brilliant pro-immigration, punk anthem entitled Danny Nedelko, which takes its name from one of the band’s close friends (and Ukrainian immigrant). The song is accompanied by a self-directed video that features Danny himself.

Singer Joe Talbot summarizes: “This album is an attempt to be vulnerable to our audience and to encourage vulnerability; a brave naked smile in this shitty new world. We have stripped back the songs and lyrics to our bare flesh to allow each other to breathe, to celebrate our differences, and act as an ode to communities and the individuals that forge them. Because without our community, we’d be nothing.”

‘Joy as an Act of Resistance.’ out 31st August 2018

Live at Leeds Festival have added further artists to our 2018 line-up, huge additions including:

The Vaccines, Idles, CABBAGE, Nadine Shah, Rae Morris, Superorganism and Bad Sounds.

They and around 70 artists will join the already announced Ash, Sunset Sons, Pulled Apart by Horses, Dermot Kennedy, Circa Waves, Peace, British Sea Power, and The Horrors on 5th May in Leeds City Centre. Live at Leeds is the ultimate place to hear the essential new sounds of 2018, join us on Saturday 5th May- we’re sure you will find your new favourite band!

Check out all the artists on our Artists page, where we have social and listening links on every artist on the line-up. Live at Leeds is part of Leeds International Festival.

Being one of the first festivals of the year, Handmade acts as the perfect precursor to discover the character of the musical landscape which lies in the year ahead.

Their line up for 2018 includes Circa Waves, Idles, Little Comets, Dinosaur Pile-Up plus many more.

 

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Bristol punk band Idles have been toiling on the circuit for yonks I recall seeing them at Live At Leeds maybe four years ago, without ever getting a further up the venue listings , although they threatened a while back with a clutch of ferocious singles and the Welcome EP, but it wasn’t until last year that they found a new impetus to thrust them into the spotlight.

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Their next EP “Meat” saw a gang of snarling, foaming-at-the-mouth brutes amped up on adrenaline and rage  but it’s not pointless angst, not by a long shot. It has never been about waving a fist against nowt in particular . Idles have always focused fury into focus that burrows under your skin and leaves a permanent mark.

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On their debut “Brutalism” Idles have distilled their emotions into bite-size chunks of raucous noise. It’s punk, or post-punk, with bruised and bruising guitars flailing before grazed bass and drums hit so hard most people’d snap a wrist, but it’s crucially human. mini-hits “Well Done” and “Stendahl Syndrome” . But although Brutalism may have it’s downer moments, the boundless charisma of frontman Joe Talbot shines through and offers a weird kind of optimism. He is effortlessly poignant without pretence, speaking plain and diving deep into assaults on Tory cabals, British society, the downfall of the NHS, the cult of celebrity, drawing deep from his relationships with such topics and blasting them through the prism of wry punk while galvanised by the loss of his own mother.

Nothing is especially new here – punk isn’t new, nor is humour or political lyrics, but what Idles offer is a sincere view from a place of passion, and that is invigorating. They demand change with a smirk and a revolutionary fervour, some of the material on Brutalism is ludicrously catchy. Almost every track on the LP is a potent call-to-arms that beckons action of some kind.

There’s a thrilling danger ever present whenever Idles are around Idles are one of the most exciting British bands right now and “Brutalism” is such proof.

IDLES – ” Mother “

Posted: March 16, 2017 in MUSIC
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Its an infestation of the senses, a roar on all our responsibilities, and a contagious noise fuelled trespass on everything in between. The debut album from British quintet Idles rips into personal and social issues with the insatiable attitude and defiance unleashed in the late seventies, its sound as much punk rock rage as it is a post punk/noise rock  enslaving of the imagination and psyche.

Each song from the Bristol five-piece of Joe Talbot, Mark Bowen, Lee Kiernan, Adam Devonshire, and Jon Beavis is such a creative growl, a visceral infectious edge and mischief just as bruising and incisive. Dedicated in part to the loss of Talbot’s mother, who adorns the record’s cover, Brutalism is stretched with such invasive treats, from start to finish a mordant adventure, challenge, and accusation as witty as it is vicious, as devilish as it is ferocious. With Idles in the early days of an UK tour, their first album is sure to see it’s already eagerly devoured.

Straight away band and album show uniqueness within a proposition which also swiftly inspires thoughts of bands such as The Fall, Swell Maps, and early The Horrors. There is so much more to it though as that originality shows, opener Heel_Heal cantankerously striding from an initial dispute with an nagging riff and rhythmic tenacity which alone lures keen attention as Talbot’s equally confrontational vocals snarl. Punk rock infested with crabbily textured noise, the track rumbles and grumbles; with band vocals as anthemically rousing and spiteful as the general character of the outstanding starter.

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Straight away band and album show uniqueness within a proposition which also swiftly inspires thoughts of bands such as The Fall, Swell Maps, and early The Horrors. There is so much more to it though as that originality shows, opener Heel_Heal cantankerously striding from an initial dispute with an nagging riff and rhythmic tenacity which alone lures keen attention as Talbot’s equally confrontational vocals snarl. Punk rock infested with crabbily textured noise, the track rumbles and grumbles; with band vocals as anthemically rousing and spiteful as the general character of the outstanding starter.

Being truly excited by something new or unique is a treat rarely found these days, Idles though have cracked that desire in fine style with Brutalism.

Brutalism is out now on Balley Records through iTunes and other stores.


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