Posts Tagged ‘Fontaines D.C’

The new album from Fontaines D.C.—‘A Hero’s Death’—arrives July 31st. Available on deluxe gatefold 2x 180g vinyl, limited edition stormy blue vinyl, standard black vinyl, two pocket wallet CD, limited edition cassette, and MP3, lossless or 24-bit WAV digital album. Each album purchase comes with an instant grat download of “A Hero’s Death” (the single), and the full digital album to be delivered on release day. Barely a year after the release of their acclaimed debut album Dogrel (which charted Top 10 in the UK, earned a Mercury Prize nomination, and No. 1 Album of the Year positions for BBC 6Music and Rough Trade), Dublin, Ireland post-punk outfit Fontaines D.C. return with an intensely confident, patient, and complex sophomore album. A Hero’s Death arrives battered and bruised, albeit beautiful – a heady and philosophical take on the modern world, and its great uncertainty.

Barely a year after the release of their hugely acclaimed debut album ‘Dogrel’, which earned a Mercury Prize nomination and Album of the Year 2019 , Dublin’s Fontaines D.C. have returned with an intensely confident, patient, and complex follow up album. ‘A Hero’s Death’ arrives battered and bruised, albeit beautiful – a heady and philosophical take on the modern world, and its great uncertainty.

released July 31, 2020

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While we’re still processing the full impact of their immense 2019 debut ‘Dogrel’, this Dubliners weren’t resting on their laurels – they were off crafting their next masterpiece – & a masterpiece it is for sure. Their follow up album ‘A Hero’s Death’ is the kind of second offering that makes you desperately hope & pray that this is just the beginning of a generation definining catalogue. although it’s an intensely confident record, it is also much more subtle, patient & complex. it arrives battered, bruised & beautiful – a heady & philosophical take on the modern world, equally elating and heartbreaking – made all the more visecral & lucid once again by super producer Dan Carey.

Everyone has made no secret of our adoration of these young Dubliners. ‘A Hero’s Death’ sees them follow up the spellbinding ‘Dogrel’ without missing a beat – they’ve taken their cues from the cure again, and have added the mood setting of joy division and a touch of the rougher edges of early 4ad. they manage to tread that line that makes old heads reminisce and rejoice in new music and young fans fall in love with loud guitars and pummelling drums at that same time.

Live, they’re on another level. we’ve been watching them tear up stages since they first made their UK debut. They may have slowed things down on record with more complicated structures but at heart, these are 5 young punks and their live show will make sure you remember that. fast, loud and adrenaline filled – you’re guaranteed to be leaving chalk sweaty and grinning.

The band’s explosive rise to the top has been potent, instantaneous and eventful, and a journey so fuelled by action always seemed destined to influence what followed.

Reacting to the challenge of sustaining the self as much as the individual expression, ‘A Hero’s Death’ represents the band’s reaction to the intensity of life on the road and managing the expectations of others. The debut album ‘Dogrel’ echoes the energy of their early gigs coupled with descriptions of Dublin. Transporting the listener to specific places and sights, the inclusion of local reference points formed a poetic reportage of their hometown, while the usage of critical commentary tackled topics like capitalism and consumerism through lyrics.

The seductive opener ‘I Don’t Belong’ tackles isolation and lets persistent rhythms merge. A perfect initiation, it outlines the overall theme. ‘Love Is the Main Thing’ runs through similar veins, its pulsating, hypnotic intensity and distinct drumming meld with spoken word.

Euphonic bass lines and subtle guitar tones blend on ‘Televised Mind’ while surreal sonics take over ‘A Lucid Dream’, a track of volcanic force. The sentiment of ‘You Said’ offers an alluring instant before the nostalgic, idealised imagery and Johnny Marr-resembling guitar lines of ‘Oh Such A Spring’ begin.

With an energy reminiscent of ‘Hurricane Laughter’ and ‘Boys In the Better Land’, ‘A Hero’s Death’ bestows a vibrant moment, dishing out dos and don’ts mingled with hints of sarcasm. But “You need not be/Born wealthy/If you care/You’re the heir” is a lyric from ‘Living In America’ where the vibe changes as industrial Suicide-like bleakness lingers and creates powerful sonics.

Elsewhere, the melodic Beach Boys-like moment of ‘I Was Not Born’ furnishes a contrast of sorts. “I was not born/into this world/to do another man’s bidding”, insists frontman Grian Chatten before the hazy, subdued mood of ‘Sunny’ becomes pleasantly disorientating.

Subversive, non-conformist and melodious, this record has the credentials of a classic rock and roll album. The decision to take a radical approach only works for the few, the possession of ammunition that’s needed to master such a challenge is not for anyone. Fontaines D.C. have it, and it seems as though they are only just scratching the surface of what’s to come…

Filmed by Collective Dublin & captured within 2fm radio’s studio in Montrose, Dublin – a sweeping space usually the reserve of orchestra performances – “A Night at Montrose, Dublin” will air on Monday 3rd august at 8pm. this is a global event and open to all ages.

“amazing!! how do we get to see this performance?”, let’s get the beers in & all virtually hang out together on the evening of 3rd august to celebrate the new album. it’s one hell of a record – trust us!.

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There’s something shattering about the music of Fontaines D.C. Following on from the release of “I Don’t Belong” last month, the Irish post-punk outfit return today with another piercing look into the void in the form of “Televised Mind.” “That’s a televised mind/That’s a televised mind/That’s a televised mind,” repeats frontman Grian Chatten on the song – an incisive indictment of groupthink and echo-chamber living that cuts like a knife.

It is the third track shared from their forthcoming LP A Hero’s Death, which is out on the 31st July.

The track heaves, drones, and churns – a faultless embodiment of the bruised and battered – perfect in its uneasy, resigned melancholy.

“Televised Mind” taken from the forthcoming album ‘A Hero’s Death’ out 31st July on Partisan Records.

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Barely a year since their debut Dogrel earned them a spot as one of the most acclaimed new bands of 2019, Dublin’s Fontaines D.C. will return with “A Hero’s Death” on July 31 via Partisan Records. Arriving battered and bruised – albeit beautiful – the album is anything but a re-hash of the swaggering energy from their first record, instead the music is patient, confident, and complex – heady and philosophical takes on the modern world and its great uncertainty. The album serves as a conscious effort to subvert expectations, to challenge themselves and their listeners, and to sacrifice one identity in order to take on another – one that is fully their own.

We’re giving away handwritten lyrics by Grian for ‘I Don’t Belong’ & ‘A Hero’s Death’ and also a signed 7″. Pre-save ‘A Hero’s Death’ and follow us on Spotify by Monday 6th July for a chance to win fontainesDC.lnk.to/contest

Irish rockers Fontaines D.C. came out swinging on their debut album Dogrel—it became one of the years favourite albums of last year thanks to its propulsive rhythms, Grian Chatten’s mesmerizing speak-sing and their satisfying blend of post-punk, garage and surf sounds. After cementing themselves as one of the most exciting new bands of 2019, excitement began to swirl when news started circulating about a quick follow-up album that was recorded in Los Angeles and influenced by The Beach Boys. I figured an album full of surfy tunes like Dogrel highlight “Liberty Belle” and 2017 b-side “Winter in the Sun” was on the way, which I undoubtedly would’ve devoured, but that’s pretty far from what we’ll actually receive at the end of July.

A Hero’s Death is decidedly not perky—it’s full of somber, gothic numbers, slow ballads and a few very on-the-nose nods to Brian Wilson (but this is dejected Pet Sounds era Beach Boys—not the carefree “Surfin’ U.S.A.” Beach Boys). It’s not what many will expect from the group, but it’s a noticeably more mature second chapter that pays dividends with each listen. Sprinkled with ’60s armchair pop and ’80s post-punk references, this is a gloomy outdoor stroll record—but a very special one at that.

Fontaines D.C. perform A Hero’s Death Live at home for Later… with Jools Holland.

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Fontaines D.C.’s second album is out at the end of this month, which means the promo trail is giving us new songs from the record to hear as we approach.

So far, we’ve heard two very different songs from the record. ‘I Don’t Belong’ is a slower Whipping Boy-esque opening track while the title track is a looser take on the kind of thing that won that much praise on album one.

‘Televised Mind’ is coming from a different place, with a more psych-rock edge on a song they say, is inspired by The Brian Jonestown Massacre, which is about the echo chambers people have made for themselves – “how personality gets stripped away by surrounding approval.”

“This song is about the echo chamber, and how personality gets stripped away by surrounding approval. People’s opinions get reinforced by constant agreement, and we’re robbed of our ability to feel wrong. We’re never really given the education of our own fallibility. People feign these great beliefs in order to appear trendy, as opposed to independently arriving at their own thoughts.

We were listening to a lot of The Prodigy and The Brian Jonestown Massacre, specifically their song “Open Heart Surgery”. I was interested in extrapolating those types of chord progressions and capturing this droning, hypnotic feel. That last line repeated over and over [“What ya call it”] is a buffer expression that people used here in Dublin. It’s sort of like “umm” or “well…” – it’s what people say when they’re distracted.

“Televised Mind” taken from the forthcoming album ‘A Hero’s Death’ out 31st July on Partisan Records.

A Hero's Death. Vinyl - 1×LP, Coloured Vinyl - Limited Edition Stormy Blue Vinyl

Dublin band Fontaines D.C. have shared a second single from their upcoming second album A Hero’s Death. Powered by a descending bassline played high on the neck and slashing guitars, “I Don’t Belong” is a brooding, smoldering track that owes just a little to Joy Division. It’s the opening song on the album and you can listen below.
A Hero’s Death is out July 31st via Partisan Records.

The new album from Fontaines D.C.—‘A Hero’s Death’—arrives July 31. Available on deluxe gatefold 2x 180g vinyl, limited edition stormy blue vinyl, standard black vinyl, two pocket wallet CD, limited edition cassette, and MP3, lossless or 24-bit WAV digital album. Each album purchase comes with an instant grat download of “A Hero’s Death” (the single), and the full digital album to be delivered on release day.

Barely a year after the release of their hugely acclaimed debut album ‘Dogrel’, which earned a Mercury Prize nomination and Album of the Year 2019 at both BBC 6Music and Rough Trade record store, Dublin’s Fontaines D.C. have returned with an intensely confident, patient, and complex follow up album. ‘A Hero’s Death’ arrives battered and bruised, albeit beautiful – a heady and philosophical take on the modern world, and its great uncertainty.

The new album from Fontaines D.C.  ‘A Hero’s Death’—arrives July 31st. Available on deluxe gatefold 2x 180g vinyl, limited edition stormy blue vinyl, standard black vinyl, two pocket wallet CD, limited edition cassette, and MP3, lossless or 24-bit WAV digital album. Each album purchase comes with an instant great download of “A Hero’s Death” (the single), and the full digital album to be delivered on release day.

Barely a year after the release of their hugely acclaimed debut album ‘Dogrel’, which earned a Mercury Prize nomination and Album of the Year 2019 at both BBC6 Music and Rough Trade record store, Dublin’s Fontaines D.C. have returned with an intensely confident, patient, and complex follow up album. ‘A Hero’s Death’ arrives battered and bruised, albeit beautiful – a heady and philosophical take on the modern world, and its great uncertainty.

Releases July 31st, 2020, “A Hero’s Death” taken from the forthcoming album out 31st July on Partisan Records.

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Our video for the album version of “Liberty Belle” is out today. The Dublin punk outfit, who released their acclaimed debut album ‘Dogrel’ last April, take stock of their hugely successful 2019 in the new visuals. Following the group out on the road, the video intersperses shots of backstage antics with ferocious live performances from the past year – including last month’s sold-out Dublin homecoming. The crowd is also captured on 35mm film.

We wanted to make this video as so much has changed and it’s been so long since we made the original one. “Liberty Belle is a lament to the death of old Dublin, written by people who couldn’t afford the new one,” says frontman Grain Chatten of the track.

This new release comes after Fontaines D.C. confirmed that they’ve finished recording their second album, which they’ve said was inspired by The Beach Boys. “We did it all in October. That’s been my real favourite moment of 2019, making the new record,” said guitarist Carlos O’Connell.

The musician went on to reveal that the upcoming LP would be “very different, both musically and lyrically” to its predecessor.

Few bands have captured the same excitement for rock as well as Fontaines DC do on “Dogrel”.

At its heart, Fontaines DC’s debut is about a city losing its spirit to gentrification, an attempt to document Dublin’s culture and character before the times plaster over the craic and move on.

With that romantic goal in mind, Dogrel is full of literate lyrical sketches. Frontman Grian Chatten’s drawled pub poetry captures Irish Republican cabbies (“He spits out ‘Brits out’ only smokes Carrolls”) as easily as the emptiness of capitalist pursuits (“Money is the sandpit of the soul”) and the band colour it all with raucous post-punk and garage rock.

Fontaines DC are a cracking new band from Ireland who’ve really excited me this year. Their debut LP Dogrel is full of intense, dynamic, rocket fuelled post-punk. It sounds inquisitive and passionate, like a band with a deep love of musicianship still exploring the edges of their sound.

Fontaines DC also love poetry and sing about James Joyce, which feels very romantic, especially since many of their songs are about life in Dublin. It’s thrilling, gritty rock from a band with infinite possibilities ahead of them. The result is universal, despite the record being as intrinsically linked to its hometown as a gold harp on a pint glass.

‘Sha Sha Sha’ is taken from the debut LP ‘Dogrel’ by Fontaines D.C. Out now on Partisan Records

Fontaines-DC-on-Fallon

With all the talk about Fontaines D.C. the Dublin band’s debut, album “Dogrel” pretty great reviews, the Dublin city themes and the PR narratives, The band keep on rolling right into the larger consciousness.

Some radio presenters, papers and publications are hailing the release of the group’s debut LP Dogrel as akin to a new chapter for Irish music. Paul McCloone labelled it the best debut in years . That’s a lot of expectation to put on any group and yet, the Fontaines D.C have found many champions internationally, with KEXP, NME, DIY Mag and lots more heaping praise on the group and album.

Last night, the band made their American TV debut on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon which used to be a crucial rite of passage in the life-cycle of any hyped-up young band. performing Dogrel standout track ‘Boys in the Better Land’.

Fontaines D.C. played two songs on Fallon: “Boys In The Better Land” on the broadcast and “Liberty Belle” as an online bonus. And they ripped both of them, riffing hard and looking intense and generally seeming like they were too cool to breathe , The Music guest Fontaines D.C. gives a bonus performance of “Liberty Belle” for the Tonight Show studio audience.

Dogrel is out now on Partisan Records.