Posts Tagged ‘Melbourne’

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In the two years since releasing their second album Paint, it’s clear that Holy Holy have been making some changes and broadening their horizons. These efforts arrive in the form of their latest album, My Own Pool Of Light. The intricate melodies, soundscapes, and ever-present alluring hooks haven’t been left behind. One could say they’ve simply been given a new home amongst a plethora of fresh sounds and instrumentation.

Holy Holy’s third album My Own Pool of Light, arriving via Wonderlick/Sony Music Australia , is a twelve-track masterclass on how Holy Holy have grown into this messaging throughout the last five years, combining dizzying rhythms and flourishing melodies with some of current-day’s most important and prevalent topics – mental health, toxic masculinity, gender stereotypes and homophobia among them. “I wanted to write songs that really meant something on this album, that really had something at the core of why it was being written. Each song was trying to say something,” says Carroll on the album’s themes, and you can really feel this harnessed as the album’s punchy – yet, impactful – duration draws longer.

The first song we wrote for this album revolves around a 60s sounding vocal loop. We wanted to make it sound like an old sample and after many iterations, we got it there. The loop, built out of vocals from Ali Barter, Ainslie Wills and myself, is the bed upon which the song builds. Driving drums, menacing offbeat synths and fast tambourines back a wide-ranging spoken vocal approach.

This, and Tim’s vocal. It’s more based upon samples, and less on guitar. Faces is about a lot of things – online arguments; smartphone narcissism; the Australian treatment of refugees; and our ability to ignore inconvenient truths. It lays out a lot of the ideas that we’ve been wrestling with, and sets the tone for the rest of the record.

Pegged as the group’s biggest creative leap since the release of their debut album five years ago, ‘Maybe You Know’ kicks off the album with a steady drum beat and a sharp riff. It’s accompanied by songs like ‘Flight’, ‘Sandra’ and ‘Teach Me About Dying’, all of which provide the perfect marriage of the new and the old.

‘Hatswing’ is a taster of the musicality and creativity the duo has had hidden up their sleeve. It’s a rhythmically urgent tune that relies on the impeccable percussion to drive it along, yet still manages to maintain the anthemic vocals that fans have come to love from Holy Holy.

Vocalist Timothy Carroll comes through at the end of the record with a hauntingly slow and atmospheric vocal performance on ‘St Petersburg’. It’s one of the many songs on the 12-track album that give an idea of the creative freedom finally attained by Carroll and guitarist Oscar Dawson.

Band Members
Timothy Carroll, Oscar Dawson, Ryan Strathie (and special guests Graham Ritchie & Matt Redlich)

Holy Holy’s brand new album ‘My Own Pool Of light’ is out now!

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A year ago, Melbourne musician Grace Cummings started playing her own songs armed with nothing but an acoustic guitar and a harmonica. She has since fascinated local Melbourne audiences as she sings simple and honest songs with a powerful recklessness. Within a year she has shared bills with the likes of J Mascis and Do Re Mi as well as a breakout performance Boogie Festival. Her very first collection of solo songs will be released by Flightless Records in late 2019.

Grace comments ,A little while ago I started playing my own songs and writing more and more of them.
I went over to Jesse Williams’ house and recorded a bunch of solo songs in an afternoon… These have become my first album.

I am lucky enough to have it put out by Flightless Records who are the absolute coolest. The album ‘Refuge Cove’ comes out November 1st.

Gena Rose Bruce‘s debut album “Can’t Make You Love Me” is out worldwide now on Dot Dash Recordings.

Can’t Make You Love Me showcases Bruce’s unmistakable brand of smokey rock; smouldering vocal performances, pulsing rhythms, echoes of Mazzy Star and Lynchian undertones. It’s is an intoxicating ride through love, lust, surrender and revival

Gena Rose Bruce comes from Melbourne songstress. ‘The Way You Make Love’ is all soft and subtle psych-rock, with guitar riffs reminiscent of Brian Jonestown Massacre and vocals harking back to Mazzy Star. We’re into it.

Gena Rose Bruce’s debut album Can’t Make You Love Me is an intoxicating ride through love, lust, surrender and revival. It’s a distinct and dynamic debut from a young artist with a clear vision. Bruce’s vocals drive this album; a stirring force amidst the pulsing rhythms. A vibrant youthfulness and deep maturity underpins her writing, allowing songs to swing effortlessly between earnest introspection and cool detachment with utter sincerity. With it’s infectious melodies and biting lyricism, Can’t Make You Love Me is as playful as it is confessional. Instantly timeless and unmistakably contemporary.

The album has received widespread praise nationally and abroad, including 4+ star reviews and Album of the Week / Feature Album on NPR (USA), The Age, Herald Sun, The Sydney Morning Herald and Brisbane Times. Available now worldwide through Dot Dash Recordings.​

“Her voice just sends me…David Lynch made that third season of Twin Peaks a year too soon, cause she should’ve been playing in that bar.” – NPR Best New Music All Songs Considered (Can’t Make You Love Me)

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Melbourne-artist Sandy Hsu releases her stunningly bold and soothing new EP, “She Comes to Me in a Fever Dream”.

In the lead up to Sandy’s new EP, her single Angel Energy has reached #2 on the AMRAP charts, and the vivid and nostalgic Limbo was premiered by Frankie Magazine and featured on Purple Sneakers who described her music “beautifully effortless”. A transitional and reflective release, She Comes To Me In A Fever Dream explores themes of tenderness, strength, femininity, change and self-reconciliation. Sandy describes the release as having ‘many moments of inward looking, observing my own growth and possibly how that reflects outwardly’.

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Taken from the forthcoming EP She Comes To Me In A Fever Dream (Healthy Tapes), Sandy Hsu’s second single ‘Angel Energy’ is a reminder that change, while potentially overwhelming, can also be beautiful.

Hsu has realised that she knows nothing, and has accepted this, embracing growth, learning and transformation. Hsu’s lyrics bleed self-awareness, sometimes harshly so, and she threads them delicately through a swirling, ethereal mist.

Sandy Hsu’s upcoming EP She Comes To Me In A Fever Dream is out via Healthy Tapes digitally and on limited cassette on September 26th.

releases September 26th, 2019

Written, Produced and Performed by Sandy Hsu

The debut album from Melbourne, Australia quintet Possible Humans has been a long-time coming. Since forming in 2012, the band (comprised of Samuel Tapper, Leon Cranswick, and the three Hewitt brothers; Steven, Adam, and Mark) have self-released a “live improv” cassette & a two-song 7-inch on Sydney’s Strange Pursuits label while periodically teasing a forthcoming full-length and burning up live venues across Australia. Resulting album“Everybody Split” was announced to arrive on April Fool’s Day of 2019 on ex-Twerps drummer Alex MacFarlane’s (very excellent) Hobbies Galore label. Thankfully, it wasn’t a prank & the edition of 200 LPs sold out in a flash. Trouble In Mind is proud to re-release Everybody Split worldwide in a more substantial pressing in hopes of getting this amazing album into everyone’s ears. The album reminds me of why I fell in love with that 80s/90s alt rock sound. Melodies are on point, hooks are plentiful and the guitars are warm and nicely distorted. All is as should be. Early GBV and REM fans, this is your jam

All five members have shared songwriting duties on “Everybody Split”, & the album’s nine tracks jangle and clang with that urgent, nervous energy felt in some of the best DIY/underground rock from the past three decades, R.E.M., Guided By Voices, Feelies et al, but also absolutely of the NOW, swooning with a smoothed, amber patina of melancholy and longing (see opener “Lung of the City”, or “Nomenclature Airspace”).

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There’s a palpable crackle emanating from the tunes on Everybody Split, throwing sparks thru a myriad of interesting melodic/lyrical twists & turns, like the earworm riffage on “The Thumps”, that hotwire solo on “Aspiring To Be A Bloke” or the stutter stops / breakdown in the raging “Stinger”. Stick around for “Born Stoned”, the album’s undeniable highlight, packing its near-12 minutes with nods not only to the aforementioned R.E.M. & Feelies dark jangle, but also the smoke & velvet solos of Heyday-era Church or Blue Oyster Cult. Yes, it’s really that good. Everybody Split was recorded by MacFarlane himself & mastered by Oz-legend Mikey Young for maximum oomph.

released August 2nd, 2019

Possible Humans is: Leon Cranswick, Samuel Tapper, Steve Hewitt, Adam Hewitt and Mark Hewitt.

Taken from the Melbourne band’s debut album “Everybody Split”. released by Trouble In Mind Records on August 2nd, 2019

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Highly anticipated second album, one and a half years after their critically acclaimed debut LP. Featuring members of the now-defunct band The Drones. Recommend If You Like: King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, Nick Cave, The Slits, Protomartyr, The Drones, Gang of Four, IDLES.
“I’ve invented fake news as a genre of music,” Gareth Liddiard observes with a laugh. Heʼs talking about Maria 63, the closing track on Tropical Fuck Stormʼs sophomore LP “Braindrops”. The song takes aim at the once-marginalized alt-right conspiracy theories that now seem to be a driving force behind the rise of fascism in global politics. “It may be the most stupid song ever written,” Liddiard jokes. Heʼs wrong, Maria 63 is emblematic of Tropical Fuck Stormʼs keen ability to mine the extreme edge of pop cultureʼs periphery for potent musical and conceptual spice.

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Tropical Fuck Storm were formed around 2017 in the city of Melbourne, Victoria along Australiaʼs south-eastern coast. The band released their debut long-player A Laughing Death in Meatspace on Joyful Noise Recordings in 2018. Each of the bandʼs four members bring considerable experience to the group. Liddiard and Fiona Kitschin were part of the long-running and critically-acclaimed act The Drones, while Erica Dunn and Lauren Hammel have performed in a variety of well-received projects. Perhaps itʼs that wealth of rock and roll experience that allows Tropical Fuck Storm to so expertly deconstruct and distort the genreʼs norms. “Everything we do, we try to do it in a weird way. The whole album is full of weird beats, and just weird shit everywhere,” Liddiard explains. He cites Doc at the Radar Station-era Captain Beefheart as a key sonic touchstone, and Braindrops certainly shares the Captainʼs penchant for pounding abstract grooves.

It’s a amazing doozy, perhaps even more so than its predecessor — and keep in mind, this is coming from a band known for slinging tales of Soviet chess machines, shellfish-related conspiracy theories, and “antimatter animals.” Consider the tremulous guitar riff leading off album opener “Paradise” a facsimile for the record’s sun-poisoned strain of dadaist pop: an prolonged, paranoid sirens’ song peppered with references to Pokémon, Eugene Leary, global warming, and leg-humping dogs. Highlights include “The Happiest Guy Around,” a rowdy cut that, with its chattered vocals and ebullient energy, recalls a Beegees simulation gone awry; and the bristling title track, a sprightly, staccato race against the doomsday clock.

Tropical Fuck Storm have achieved a uniquely off-kilter sound on Braindrops.

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Hachiku, a.k.a Anika Ostendorf, 24, writes and produces dream pop with an an avant garde twist from whichever bedroom she is currently inhabiting.

Inspired by other do-it-yourself artists like Grimes, Hachiku AKA singer/songwriter Anika Ostendorf writes and produces her shoegaze/dream pop with an avant garde twist on operatic vocals from whichever bedroom she’s currently inhabiting. Born in Detroit but raised in Germany, Anika is what can be best described as a “global artist“ whose bedroom’s are continuously changing. She began to form her sound aged sixteen on a road trip round 42 of 50 US states (accompanied only by her dog, called Lexus), before moving to London and then to Melbourne, further developing her music with influences from across the globe. Her unique brand of layered “glitterpop“ paints dreamy landscapes of monumental sound, with each song carrying the listener on a melodic journey.

Her celestial bedroom beats are already creating a buzz – she opened for Courtney Barnett on her European tour in 2015 and continues to collaborate with Milk! Records.
Hachiku is now permanently based in Melbourne and plans to release her debut EP in June

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released June 2nd, 2017

“What to do with a spud like you?” Melbourne post-punk wags Terry return this summer with their new EP “Who’s Terry?”. Following on from last year’s huge-sounding I’m Terry album, this third EP from the band brings you right up to date with their wobbly politico-pop.

Spud is a class A toe-tapper that sees the band don fatigues and set their sights on the enemy. The rough and the tough, wrestled wrists and fools with crooked smiles all make an appearance as Terry sing as one over snare snaps and keyboard croaks.Bizzo and Tophat follows with a stride acrossthe underbelly, a thick slice of bop-heavy observation that gives way to one of Terry’s most elegiac refrains… “holding on and going forth”! Their gang vocal approach never sounding more resolute. Eggs then picks up the pace, a sure-footed romp that skips alongside prods of saxophone to join the parade.

Drawn for Days pulls the EP to a close, a sedate, melodic ponderance of strummy guitar, jangling bells and Amy and Xanthe’s soft-sung vocals. “Haunted by the big and small, hunted hanging for the fancy fall”. “I can’t stand up” the band decry in unison as the track scales its peak and gives way to warping synth noise. Who’s Terry encapsulates what Terry does best, the queasy marriage of the upbeat and traumatic, the catchy instant and the nagging distance. Their alliterative lyrics always sharp as tacks, their sense of melody and beat sunk deep in the heart of now.

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From the opening seconds of Bananagun’s “Do Yeah” – which stirs to life in an intoxicating blend of 1970s afrobeat, fuzzed out psychedelia and immersive pop – this very much feels like the case of discovering something different. this track comes from a brand new Melbourne band. With the aim of merging the proto-garage rhythmic fury of The Monks with the tropicália grooves of Os Mutantes, the band soon forged a sound that was as loose and unravelling as it was focused and taut, with an aim of creating a real sense of place and environment. “We didn’t want to do what everyone else was doing,” the band say. “We wanted it to be vibrant, colourful and have depth like the jungle. Like an ode to nature.”

There’s a deeply percussive element to the band’s psychedelic ode to mother nature, touching upon Fela Kuti-esque repetitions, exotica, jazz and 1960s pop-rock. Much like a lot of the influences it filters into its own unique spin on it all, it’s intended as “music for the people” – a unifying groove that spans genres. Even the seemingly innocuous band name has an underlying message of connectivity that matches the universality of the music. “It’s like non-violent combat! Or the guy who does a stick up but it’s just a banana, not a gun, and he tells the authorities not to take themselves too seriously.” This extends to the underlying message of their debut single too: “try to love and not hate because you’re the one who has to carry it around.”

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Releases September 6th, 2019

Nick vanBakel – Guitar, Percussion, Voice
Stella Rennex – Bass, Voice
Jimi Gregg – ThunderDrum
Charlotte Tobin – Djembe
Jack Crook – Guitar, voice of reason

Songs written by Nick vanBakel

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In keeping with the way Russack recorded her two 2018 albums she made with fellow Melbourne musician and great friend Lachlan Denton, over a year with Liam Halliwell and Dylan Young on hand, each track on the album was recorded in one take and live to tape at Phaedra Studies and mixed immediately thereafter by John Lee. Hence, not only its rusticity and fragility but also its immediacy and authenticity.

Emma gave us a taste of the album in the single What Is Love? late in 2018. Recorded for the short film An Athlete Wrestling a Python, Emma writes about the simplicities of love, asking “What Is Love?”. During the song she asks, “is it borrowing a t-shirt?” or is it “reading over shoulders?”. It is many things! Apart from the personal lyrical content, the other prevalent thing in the song is the piano taking the lead. It also does soon the new single Winter Blues. The four-and-a-half-minute single is the album’s centrepiece. Incredibly subtle and incredibly beautiful, the song floats in a sombre key, intermittently dotted by Russack’s contemplations, “blame it on the winter blues”.

The piano is also showcased on the album’s quieter moments: Like the Wind, Horses and the album’s stunning finale Never Before.

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releases July 5th, 2019
Players: Liam Halliwell, Dylan Young, Emma Russack