Posts Tagged ‘Anna Burch’

Anna Burch and Fred Thomas take different roads to disaster on their split 7”

Over the last six years, Anna Burch and Fred Thomas have been peers on similar journeys, navigating the ever turbulent world of self-expression in the form of underfunded indie rock. This kinship has included playing in each other’s bands, collaborating on songs together, informal jams and song sketching sessions, and an honest chain of feedback on each other’s sounds.

Anna Burch and Fred Thomas have a lot in common. They’re both disarmingly witty and intuitive songwriters, both Michiganders, both intent on toying with indie-pop and bending it to their will. And ever since Thomas sent Burch’s demo to Polyvinyl Records two summers ago — attached to a note that read “This is not a drill. You need to hear this” — they’ve been label mates too. During the making of their recent albums, they’d share mixes, drafts, and ideas frequently. The two could count on each other for sincerity and to let the other know what was and wasn’t working, and it was coming from a creative equal dealing with the same questions and confusions.

http://

The two songs here are behind-the-scenes evidence of that kind of communication; extra material that came from those collaborative moments or an ongoing conversation that helped shape their work. Burch contributes the dreamlike but shadowy “St. Adalbert” a track she wrote and recorded a half-decade ago. In contrast to her often melodically upbeat 2018 debut LP Quit The Curse, “St. Adalbert” comes across forlorn — a song about loneliness in the middle of a crisis. “None of my friends wanna hear it / So I’ll try harder to keep it quiet,” she sings ghostlike in the first verse.

Thomas’s “Parkways” is the breezier-sounding of the two, its jangly guitars floating along on a flood of Burch’s harmonies. Like much of Thomas’s work though, the catastrophe and calamity comes through after a couple of listens. “‘Outside again like a dream without a skull to hold it in,’” he sings at the top. “That was the only thought from those dark days / To survive my slowly eroding mental landscape / The only scrap not soaked through with red wine and dread.” Anna’s harmony parts give it such a soaring feeling, even though it’s a pretty depressive song at heart.

released March 1st, 2019

Fred Thomas had been making music nonstop for years when a seismic shift in his creative process happened in 2013. Something mystical opened up in the fall of that year and the prolific songwriter moved from his already emotionally open style into an unprecedentedly direct and vulnerable lyrical approach as well as new levels of detail-fixated production. The songs took on ​a ​new urgency​, inspired by a feeling that life was beginning afresh while at the same time a lifetime of experiences were cementing into worlds of memory.​ ​The results of that creatively eruptive time began with 2015’s critically hailed album All Are Saved, continued into the turbulent pop of 2017’s Changer and now ​float​ into Aftering, a record that feels like the final chapter of an unofficial trilogy.

Just as the two before it, Aftering was produced, mixed and assembled on location in a close collaboration between Thomas and Athens, Georgia based engineer Drew Vandenberg. All cut from the same cloth, Aftering ties the knots that connect all three records. Where both All Are Saved and Changer flitted nervously between moments of jangly power pop,​ electronic​ interludes and experimental acoustic weirdness, Aftering maps out a far more intentional arc, burning through a first act of ​speedy​, hook-h​e​a​vy guitar ​rock before taking a sharp, brutal dive into an abyss on the album’s second half.

Modeled loosely after Neil Young’s On The Beach, the nine songs here move from ​jumpy ​two minute blasts into a suite of ​four ​protracted​ and​ moody ​interconnected ​pieces​.​​ At first, ​Thomas‘ signature mesh of soaring melodies and experimental pop keeps things upbeat even when burying intense topics on songs like “Alcohol Poisoning” or in the post-election unrest of “Good Times Are Gone Again.” ​Beginning with 8-minute fever dream “House Show, Late December,” the ache​ that sits ​in the core of the ​album comes to the surface completely. From here guitars almost vanish from the instrumentation​ and​ the focus shift​s​ to tightly arranged strings, ominous synth​s​, ambient waves and ​spoken ​lyrics somewhere between poetry and desperate confession​. ​These longer songs drift in and out of each other slowly, drowning into their own lush darkness and heavy observations on anxiety, family and emotional abuse.

Connecting all three albums to an even deeper degree, Aftering finally realizes loose threads that began on earlier records, and calls on special guest​s​ from all phases of ​Thomas’​ life. Anna Burch returns to sing on ​buoyant ​single “Altar” and longtime friend and collaborator Elliot Bergman helps sculpt the ​crystalline​ vibe of album closer “What The Sermon Said.” Newer friends show up as well, with members of Bonny Doon, Common Holly, Deadbeat Beat and other artists ​Thomas connected with through years of touring showing up in supporting roles over the course of the record. Wolf Eyes member and noted memelord John Olson even contributes some fried horns and electronics.

More than anything, Aftering calmly sets down the restless questioning and turmoil of the trilogy. Instead of landing on any tidy conclusion or neatly wrapping up a thesis, the album illuminates the themes of observation and acceptance that have run throughout ​Thomas’ work for the last five years. Aftering reflects on an answerless and uncertain future, trying to make sense of it through scattered memories that flash like mental postcards. A sense of larger, universal ​dread ​refracts through these moments of searching. Ultimately, it’s not the dark times or bleakness that lingers, but a sense of connection and hope that comes from trying to communicate them as honestly as possible. Aftering, like the chapters that came just before, can feel sometimes​ painful, but there’s a clarity and beauty that’s always there as well, equally bright in even the darkest moments.

http://

released September 14th, 2018

It’s an annual tradition for Polyvinyl Records to host a SXSW showcase, but this year we’re more excited than ever because we’re teaming up with stellar Brooklyn-based label Double Double Whammy!
We’ll be partying with our new friends from dusk till dawn at Cheer Up Charlie’s, with performances from Jeff Rosenstock (his only SXSW appearance!), White Reaper, Post Animal, Anna Burch, Hovvdy, Hatchie, and Lomelda.
This is also a great time to announce that PV and DDW have officially partnered up–with PV lending a hand in distribution, mailorder, and more–so stay tuned for many exciting things to come!

“Over the past few years, several of us at Polyvinyl have been fans of Double Double Whammy,” says PV co-founder, Matt Lunsford. “Last year when we met Mike and started discussing a partnership, the connection was immediate – DDW has a strong independent sprint and a passion for working together with artists they believe in.”

If you’re not familiar with Double Double Whammy, catalouge do yourself a favor and check out their incredible roster and catalog of releases!

Anna Burch is an anxious person,. the former Frontier Ruckus and Failed Flowers member sounds overwhelmed by everything that goes into releasing a solo album. Aside from writing every song on Quit the Curse, the singer/songwriter also handles the business side of the project.

“Every time I open my socials I’m so overwhelmed by how many notifications there are,” she says with a nervous laugh. “It’s been a little source of anxiety, for sure.” When it comes to the record itself, though, Burch was not by herself. With the help of producer Paul Cherry and engineer Collin Dupuis, along with numerous studio musicians, she was backed by a strong team. But the album is still hers, and for a woman who’s used to putting out records with bands, it’s a little intimidating.

“I’m feeling more vulnerable,” she admits. “[Quit the Curse is] under my name and my words and choices are being scrutinized—even though, of course, it was a collaborative effort. Other people helped make the record and played on the record, but it’s still under my name and any criticism is going to be completely directed at me.”

Fortunately, the album’s initial responses have been nothing but positive, and for that Burch is thankful. “I’m really overwhelmed by all the positive responses,” she says humbly. “It’s more than I expected—it feels great.”

That feeling is more than deserved; Burch’s musical journey has been a long one. From becoming a touring musician at the age of eighteen to getting burnt out and quitting music altogether to focus on grad school, her adult life has been a whirlwind. She’s dealt with toxic relationships, family drama, and substance abuse, and moved forward from it all. And despite being relatively new to the world of writing her own music, the Detroiter is pretty damn good at creating what she likes to call “bummer pop”—music that juxtaposes buoyant instrumentation with heavy subject matter.

“Thinking about writing those songs in a very melancholic, singer/songwriter way doesn’t seem cathartic or helpful to me,” she explains. “I wanted to make music that made me happy and that I would want to listen to.”

Seeing Alvvays for the first time, without knowing anything about the band, also helped Burch realize the direction she wanted to take her music. “I was pretty blown away,” she gushes. “And I think seeing that kind of band—electric guitars, drums, vocals—it struck me very deeply. So I was kind of like, ‘Yeah, I think I want a pop rock band backing up [my] songs.’ It was so elating, but also very emotional.”

Writing about hard times is also a therapeutic exercise for Burch. “I try to dig back into what I was feeling, and it kind of feels like there’s this weird split mentally,” she recalls. “It’s hard to tap back into that stuff in some ways, and critically think about the emotions and writing process.” And when she hits the stage, she feels that release even more. “It’s still fun performing [the songs],” she says. “I feel like I’m able to emote properly onstage without getting lost in this reverie of being overwhelmed by emotions. I think writing the songs really did the work of helping step back and be able to look in from almost an outsider’s perspective.”

Since the move to Detroit, Burch has put the past behind her. After a “messy” adjustment period, her life has slowed down a bit. “I stay in a lot—I have a steady partner that I’ve been with for three years,” she says, with a sense of peace. “Things are very different.”

So what will the future bring for Anna Burch? “I’m hoping to tour this record really hard and then get to a point where I can make the best record I can the next time around,”she says—and it’s easy to cheer her on.

Image result for images of record spines

What a long, cold, lonely month January has been . very few gigs but some great music so things are looking up.
Sad to say that Anna Burch has been pipped to the post for album of the week. I have been so hyped for her debut album and it really doesn’t let you down, definitely someone you will be seeing a lot of this year. You will be buying this anyway so I went for something you might not know.

Hookworms microshift 3000x3000

Hookworms – Microshift

Microshift marks a seismic shift in the Leeds band’s sound, dynamic, songwriting and production, whilst still bearing all the ferocious energy, intricate musicianship and bruised but beautiful song-craft of the previous releases which have quietly made them one of the UK’s most revered young bands. This is the band’s third studio album technically but arguably the first in which the studio has been central to its creation.

Radiant, immersive and teeming with light, but still heavy and forceful – the music on Microshift acts as a very deliberate counter to some of the difficult topics the album’s lyrics address. Death, disease, heartbreak, body image and even natural disaster are all present here but the overall effect these songs achieve is euphoric catharsis.

Album packshot

Anna Burch – Quit The Curse

Originally from St. Joseph, Michigan, Burch later moved to Chicago to study cinema. She relocated to Detroit a few years ago and quickly immersed herself into the local music scene, and has been involved with acts like Frontier Ruckus and Failed Flowers. After learning the ins and outs of playing live and recording with various acts over the last several years, Burch found herself accumulating a growing amount of solo material. These songs, full of sincerity and undeniable depth, caught the ears of Collin Dupuis (Angel Olsen, The Black Keys) who mixed the tracks and helped develop the final product into her debut full-length album. The nine songs that comprise Quit The Curse come on sugary and upbeat, but their darker lyrical themes and serpentine song structures are tucked neatly into what seem at first just like uncommonly catchy tunes. Burch’s crystal clear vocal harmonies and gracefully crafted songs feel so warm and friendly that it’s easy to miss the lyrics about destructive relationships, daddy issues and substance abuse that cling like spiderwebs to the hooky melodies. The maddeningly absent lover being sung to in 2 Cool 2 Care, the crowded exhaustion of With You Every Day or even the grim, paranoid tale of scoring drugs in Asking 4 A Friend sometimes feel overshadowed by the shimmering sonics that envelop them.

Gcrokfhbhtc6sj0uzyuvkxu6x40mazeasgeb8xqgzmw 8qvv75kbwty9xmrayzkfnfausqv ezvviqfe2k6bw c st hvrdlsn5mlgwql0gnarcgg2kdkxx1upkvsv6dwhy

Field Music – Open Here

Field Music return with their sixth album, Open Here. The two years since Commontime have been strange and turbulent. If you thought the world made some kind of sense, you may have questioned yourself a few times in the past two years. And that questioning, that erosion of faith – in people, in institutions, in shared experience – runs through every song on Field Music’s new album.

But there’s no gloom here. For Peter and David Brewis, playing together in their small riverside studio has been a joyful exorcism. Open Here is the last in a run of five albums made at the studio, an unprepossessing unit on a light industrial estate in Sunderland. Whilst the brothers weren’t quite tracking while the wrecking balls came, the eviction notice received in early 2017 gave the brothers a sense of urgency in the recording of Open Here. There probably won’t be many other rock records this year, or any year, which feature quite so much flute and flugelhorn (alongside the saxophones, string quartet and junk box percussion). But somehow or other, it comes together. Over thirteen years and six albums, Field Music have managed to carve a niche where all of these sounds can find a place; a place where pop music can be as voracious as it wants to be.

Kylecraft fullcirclenightmare 3600x3600 300

Kyle Craft  –  Full Circle Nightmare

Full Circle Nightmare Kyle Craft’s second album is entirely autobiographical. Sonically, thematically, lyrically, it’s a huge leap forward from his 2016 release. A straight-up rollicking rock’n’roll album, it traverses all the different nuances of the genre; from the bluegrass twang of Exile Rag, to the gothic style of Gold Calf Moan, it’s a timeless piece that could exist in any of the past five decades. In terms of contemporary peers, Craft likes to stay in his own lane. He’s an old soul who sticks to his tried and tested influences. The ironic thing is that Full Circle Nightmare sounds exactly like Kyle Craft’s America. That is what he’s built for us: the story of one man’s trials and tribulations to find his passion and voice for art and creativity in this vast opportunistic country. Where did he find it? Among the historic riches of America’s most honest sounds.

Screen shot 2017 12 20 at 01.05.40

Carlton Melton –  Mind Minerals

The new Carlton Melton album Mind Minerals is their first full length release since 2015’s widely lauded Out To Sea double opus, itself a languid drifting of drones and psychedically enhanced riffmongering. Sure, there’s been some long EP releases since.. Hidden Lights in 2017 (featuring the immeasurable drone sike float on Rememory) and Aground in 2016 (a companion, the Desert Island weather beaten psych-flow follow up to Out To Sea), now its time to soak up.. Mind Minerals. Mind Minerals finds Carlton Melton in fine fettle, all the songs were recorded and engineered at El Studio in San Francisco by Phil Manley on September 3rd and 4th 2016 (except ‘untimely’ – recorded at the Dome by Brian McDougall), the studio setting suits them – a logical progression from a weekend’s recording out at the Dome. Under Manley’s watchful ear / eye, Carlton Melton have created a futurescape soundtrack.., a 3001 Space Odyssey. The drums are more pounding and direct than before, the constantly re-assuring bass creates a helping hand to propel you through the clouds of static and shards of electrifying guitar dazzling your horizon. Synths help soothe the sharp edges and lull you into some out of body experience whilst and orchestrated calamitous scree pulls you back…. This is a breathless, yet deep breathing album. It demands full immersion. Searing guitar piercing the drone with relentless power, the core trio of Carlton Melton; Andy Duvall (drums / guitar), Clint Golden (bass guitar), and Rich Millman ( guitar / synth), have some alchemical bond that’s helped them create a post-rock / psychedelic / freeform organic slab of American Primitivism / space drift , this is unashamed head-music from the melting pot of Northern California.. 5 decades ago this album would have been released on the ESP Disk Label or even Apple.. there would have been no helter skelter if the desert Hippies had locked onto these vibes, plug in, turn on, tune out..float free.. Carlton Melton can provide your own aural microdose to reset your Mind / Psyche!!

 

Anna_Burch_by_Elene_Usdin_horizontal_crop_1_.jpg

Anna Burch is an indie pop singer-songwriter working out of Detroit. Years ago, she was the front of a band called Failed Flowers, and she had been in other bands, but she took some time away from music to go to grad school. After that, she moved to Detroit and started a solo career. She got a big break when she was spotted by fellow Michigander Fred Thomas, who was once a member of His Name is Alive, and was also the front of the indie pop band Saturday Looks Good to Me. Thomas has also put out a few solo records and contributed to dozens of albums across many genres. As the story goes, he sent her demo to Polyvinyl Records with a note that said “This is not a drill. You need to hear this”. They liked it, and they quickly signed her. Her debut album “Quit the Curse” will be out on February 2nd

This has all happened very quickly. Thomas sent the demos in the summer of 2017. She had a bunch of songs written, and she had also caught the ear of Collin Dupuis, who has mixed records by Angel Olsen, Mynabirds, The Black Keys, Grant-Lee Phillips, and many others. He helped her fine-tune those songs, and the end result is Quit the Curse. Only six months passed from the time Thomas said “listen to this” to the time Polyvinyl said “We’re putting this record out”. They announced the signing in late October and started promoting the album in November. I’ve been getting emails about a couple of the songs, and with the release date just a couple of weeks away, it’s time.
Some say she sounds like the brilliant no-fucks-given mid-90s indie rock of Liz Phair. Some people say she’s like Courtney Barnett. I get that, but I hear other things like the precision, power and punk-lite beauty of That Dog combined with the gritty and angular but silky smoothness of Julie Doiron. Boil all of that down, add a dash of Mitski, and I get Anna Burch. I love all of her songs that I’ve heard, but I love this one the most:

“Tea-Soaked Letter” is taken from Anna Burch’s debut album Quit the Curse, out 2/2/18.

Though the deceptively complex pop of “Quit the Curse” which marks the debut of Anna Burch, The Detroit singer/songwriter has been visible for the better part of her years-long career singing in the band Frontier Ruckus, or more recently co-fronting project Failed Flowers, but somewhere along the way a vibrant collection of solo material had slowly began taking form.

Growing up in Michigan, Burch’s fixation with music transitioned from a childhood of Disney and Carole King sing-alongs to more typically angsty teenage years spent covering Bright Eyes and Fiona Apple at open mic nights. By 18 she was deep into the lifestyle of the touring musician, After a few whirlwind years, exhausted and feeling a little lost, she stepped away from music completely to attend grad school in Chicago. This lasted until 2014 when she moved to Detroit and found herself starting work in earnest on solo songs she’d been making casual demos of for a year or so. Friends had been encouraging her to dive into solo music, and one particularly enthusiastic friend, Chicago musician Paul Cherry, went so far as to assemble a band around scrappy phone demos to push for a fully realized album.

“Writing songs that I actually liked for the first time gave me a feeling of accomplishment,” Burch said, “Like, I can do this too! But working with other musicians and hearing the songs go from sad singer/songwriter tunes to arranged pop songs gave me this giddy confidence that I’d never felt before.”

The process was drawn out and various drafts and recordings came and went as the months passed. By now Burch was playing low key shows and d.i.y. tours solo and had released some early versions of a few songs on a split with fellow Detroit musician Stef Chura. Even at a slow, meticulous pace, with every step the album took closer to completion, it felt more serious and more real. After a more than a year of piecemeal recording sessions, Burch was introduced to engineer Collin Dupuis (Lana Del Rey, Angel Olsen) who helped push things energetically home, mixing the already bright songs into a state of brilliant clarity.

The nine songs that comprise the album “Quit the Curse” come on sugary and upbeat, but their darker lyrical themes and serpentine song structures are tucked neatly into what seem at first just like uncommonly catchy tunes. Burch’s crystal clear vocal harmonies and gracefully crafted songs feel so warm and friendly that it’s easy to miss the lyrics about destructive relationships, daddy issues and substance abuse that cling like spiderwebs to the hooky melodies. The maddeningly absent lover being sung to in “2 Cool 2 Care”, the crowded exhaustion of “With You Every Day” or even the grim, paranoid tale of scoring drugs in “Asking 4 A Friend” sometimes feel overshadowed by the shimmering sonics that envelop them.

http://

“To me this album marks the end of an era of uncertainty. Writing songs about my emotional struggles helped me to work through some negative patterns in my personal life, while giving me the sense of creative agency I’d been searching for.”

Emerging from years spent as a supporting player, Quit the Curse stands as a liberation from feeling like Burch’s own songwriting voice was just out of reach — an opportunity, finally, for the world at large to hear what’s been on her mind for quite a while.

Two singles (“2 Cool 2 Care” and “Asking 4 a Friend”) have already been released to rave reviews, and now you can check out a third offering — “Tea-Soaked Letter”

“Comparisons to Courtney Barnett, Waxahatchee, and Eleanor Friedberger lie within her tight songwriting and infectious lyrics .” – The Line of Best Fit
[Burch’s] songs have some of the lo-fi finish and scrappy energy of 1990s indie-pop…but with a sharper edge. Frank and gratifying all the same, Burch’s tightly structured pop is an invigorating take on an evergreen sound.” – Pitchfork

releases February 2nd, 2018

Image may contain: 1 person

We’ve gotten a sneak peak of Michigan indie-rock veteran Anna Burch’s solo work with the track “2 Cool 2 Care,” and now she’s sharing another numerically infused single, “Asking 4 A Friend.” Burch’s latest confirms that her strength lies in her clarity. Her lyrics as well as her delivery is so sharp and straightforward, there’s no way you won’t hear her when she tells you, “You’re faking, you’re faking the fall.” However, her words are still ambiguous enough to assuage her mother’s concerns, as she explains via press release:

I was playing “Asking 4 a Friend” for my mom and after the first verse she very concernedly asked “Is this about drugs?” I told her it was a metaphor for going back to a bad, undefined relationship and she seemed satisfied with that.

Also, the song contains a lyrical nod to The Lemonheads’ “My Drug Buddy.”

http://

There’s something extraordinary about the story of how Anna Burch came to sign for Polyvinyl Records. The Detroit songwriter was spotted by fellow Michigan native, and Polyvinyl artist, Fred Thomas, who sent it straight to his label boss with a simple note, “This is not a drill. You need to hear this.” Listening to Anna’s new single, 2 Cool 2 CareAnna Burch is the newest addition to the Polyvinyl label. She released a self-directed video and is hitting the road. Anna used to be in a band that was a favorite of Ours, Frontier Ruckus. Now she’s taking her lovely vocals on her own.

2 Cool 2 Care is the first track to be lifted from Anna’s as yet untitled debut record out next year, an album she recorded with Angel Olsen producer Collin Dupuis. The track is a simple, but arresting piece of lo-fi atmospherics, Anna’s warm, laid back vocals, accompanied by a Frankie Cosmos-like guitar line and the simplest of ticking drum beats, an example of the whole far outweighing it’s parts. Lyrically, it seems to tackle the self-destructive tendency to over-analyse and pressurise relationships, as Anna sings, “you scare me when you’re indifferent, I like you best when you’re a mess”Sure, we’re suckers for a hazy slice of sun-drenched melancholy, but Anna Burch might just be doing it better than any act we’ve heard this year.

Anna Burch’s debut album will be out next year via Polyviynl Records. 

thanks For The Rabbits

2016 wasn’t good for much, but it’s been an absolutely fantastic year for indie rock (just like 2015, 2014 and 2013 were), and yet even amongst all the bands like Lvl Up and Sunflower Bean and Mitski and Big Thief and the Hotelier and Pity Sex going around I koved this tiny record by this Ann Arbor, Michigan band, and its pretty zippy hey-whatever guitar tunes  all nine of them in just 18 minutes. Singer-guitarist Fred Thomas was in the good Sixties-garage pop band Saturday Looks Good to Me. This is garage-y too but looser, with a vibe and a warmly small sound like it was recorded at the bottom of Ira Kaplan’s sweater drawer. They rock out a little on “8AM,” hit reedy harmonies on “Coke Floats” and bask in “the regular mundane anxiety” of whatever their life is like on “Ready for the Break.” Bassist-singer Anna Burch sings lead on the breakout drive-time bomb-drop of a focus track “Supermarket Scene,” where the guitars ring like tiny cathedral bells and she imagines the kind of meet-cute that takes years to unfold: “Maybe when we’re older/Maybe when we both get paid/We can find a place that feels like home.” . Anna Burch: Guitar & Vocals , Erin Davis: Bass Guitar ,Miles Haney: Drums ,Fred Thomas: Guitar & Vocals

http://