THIS WEEKS ESSENTIAL NEW RELEASES Friday 2nd February 2018

Posted: February 2, 2018 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
Tags: , , , ,

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What a long, cold, lonely month January has been . very few gigs but some great music so things are looking up.
Sad to say that Anna Burch has been pipped to the post for album of the week. I have been so hyped for her debut album and it really doesn’t let you down, definitely someone you will be seeing a lot of this year. You will be buying this anyway so I went for something you might not know.

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Hookworms – Microshift

Microshift marks a seismic shift in the Leeds band’s sound, dynamic, songwriting and production, whilst still bearing all the ferocious energy, intricate musicianship and bruised but beautiful song-craft of the previous releases which have quietly made them one of the UK’s most revered young bands. This is the band’s third studio album technically but arguably the first in which the studio has been central to its creation.

Radiant, immersive and teeming with light, but still heavy and forceful – the music on Microshift acts as a very deliberate counter to some of the difficult topics the album’s lyrics address. Death, disease, heartbreak, body image and even natural disaster are all present here but the overall effect these songs achieve is euphoric catharsis.

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Anna Burch – Quit The Curse

Originally from St. Joseph, Michigan, Burch later moved to Chicago to study cinema. She relocated to Detroit a few years ago and quickly immersed herself into the local music scene, and has been involved with acts like Frontier Ruckus and Failed Flowers. After learning the ins and outs of playing live and recording with various acts over the last several years, Burch found herself accumulating a growing amount of solo material. These songs, full of sincerity and undeniable depth, caught the ears of Collin Dupuis (Angel Olsen, The Black Keys) who mixed the tracks and helped develop the final product into her debut full-length album. The nine songs that comprise Quit The Curse come on sugary and upbeat, but their darker lyrical themes and serpentine song structures are tucked neatly into what seem at first just like uncommonly catchy tunes. Burch’s crystal clear vocal harmonies and gracefully crafted songs feel so warm and friendly that it’s easy to miss the lyrics about destructive relationships, daddy issues and substance abuse that cling like spiderwebs to the hooky melodies. The maddeningly absent lover being sung to in 2 Cool 2 Care, the crowded exhaustion of With You Every Day or even the grim, paranoid tale of scoring drugs in Asking 4 A Friend sometimes feel overshadowed by the shimmering sonics that envelop them.

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Field Music – Open Here

Field Music return with their sixth album, Open Here. The two years since Commontime have been strange and turbulent. If you thought the world made some kind of sense, you may have questioned yourself a few times in the past two years. And that questioning, that erosion of faith – in people, in institutions, in shared experience – runs through every song on Field Music’s new album.

But there’s no gloom here. For Peter and David Brewis, playing together in their small riverside studio has been a joyful exorcism. Open Here is the last in a run of five albums made at the studio, an unprepossessing unit on a light industrial estate in Sunderland. Whilst the brothers weren’t quite tracking while the wrecking balls came, the eviction notice received in early 2017 gave the brothers a sense of urgency in the recording of Open Here. There probably won’t be many other rock records this year, or any year, which feature quite so much flute and flugelhorn (alongside the saxophones, string quartet and junk box percussion). But somehow or other, it comes together. Over thirteen years and six albums, Field Music have managed to carve a niche where all of these sounds can find a place; a place where pop music can be as voracious as it wants to be.

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Kyle Craft  –  Full Circle Nightmare

Full Circle Nightmare Kyle Craft’s second album is entirely autobiographical. Sonically, thematically, lyrically, it’s a huge leap forward from his 2016 release. A straight-up rollicking rock’n’roll album, it traverses all the different nuances of the genre; from the bluegrass twang of Exile Rag, to the gothic style of Gold Calf Moan, it’s a timeless piece that could exist in any of the past five decades. In terms of contemporary peers, Craft likes to stay in his own lane. He’s an old soul who sticks to his tried and tested influences. The ironic thing is that Full Circle Nightmare sounds exactly like Kyle Craft’s America. That is what he’s built for us: the story of one man’s trials and tribulations to find his passion and voice for art and creativity in this vast opportunistic country. Where did he find it? Among the historic riches of America’s most honest sounds.

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Carlton Melton –  Mind Minerals

The new Carlton Melton album Mind Minerals is their first full length release since 2015’s widely lauded Out To Sea double opus, itself a languid drifting of drones and psychedically enhanced riffmongering. Sure, there’s been some long EP releases since.. Hidden Lights in 2017 (featuring the immeasurable drone sike float on Rememory) and Aground in 2016 (a companion, the Desert Island weather beaten psych-flow follow up to Out To Sea), now its time to soak up.. Mind Minerals. Mind Minerals finds Carlton Melton in fine fettle, all the songs were recorded and engineered at El Studio in San Francisco by Phil Manley on September 3rd and 4th 2016 (except ‘untimely’ – recorded at the Dome by Brian McDougall), the studio setting suits them – a logical progression from a weekend’s recording out at the Dome. Under Manley’s watchful ear / eye, Carlton Melton have created a futurescape soundtrack.., a 3001 Space Odyssey. The drums are more pounding and direct than before, the constantly re-assuring bass creates a helping hand to propel you through the clouds of static and shards of electrifying guitar dazzling your horizon. Synths help soothe the sharp edges and lull you into some out of body experience whilst and orchestrated calamitous scree pulls you back…. This is a breathless, yet deep breathing album. It demands full immersion. Searing guitar piercing the drone with relentless power, the core trio of Carlton Melton; Andy Duvall (drums / guitar), Clint Golden (bass guitar), and Rich Millman ( guitar / synth), have some alchemical bond that’s helped them create a post-rock / psychedelic / freeform organic slab of American Primitivism / space drift , this is unashamed head-music from the melting pot of Northern California.. 5 decades ago this album would have been released on the ESP Disk Label or even Apple.. there would have been no helter skelter if the desert Hippies had locked onto these vibes, plug in, turn on, tune out..float free.. Carlton Melton can provide your own aural microdose to reset your Mind / Psyche!!

 

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  1. […] via THIS WEEKS ESSENTIAL NEW RELEASES Friday 2nd February 2018 — The Fat Angel Sings […]

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