Posts Tagged ‘Detroit’

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Stef Chura sings “If only you can hear me scream” 10 full times on “Scream” before she, well, screams. Bizarrely, it’s one of the few instances on Midnight, Chura’s sophomore release and first full-length release on Saddle Creek, where she shows restraint, a fleeting respite for her vocal chords that take hit after hit throughout the entirety of the record’s 43 minutes. Howling throughout with a confident vibrato, it’s perhaps the most impressive raw vocal performance since Hop Along last put out an album, reminiscent at times of a young Karen O. A major step up from her 2017 debut Messes (which was reissued in 2018 by Saddle Creek), Midnight is the complete realization of the Detroit-based artist’s solo project, chock full of perfectly fuzzed-out guitars on one of the best-recorded DIY-leaning records in quite some time. That’s thanks in large part to Car Seat Headrest frontman Will Toledo, who helps mold Chura’s songs into ones that sound like his own. “Scream” resembles the song structure of Teens of Denial’s “Unforgiving Girl (She’s Not An),” though potentially even exceeding it as Chura’s guitar solo provides a fist-in-the-air moment before she brings the house down for one final chorus. Chura has been one of the more buzzed-about rising artists in the indie rock community for quite some time; Midnight more than delivers on that initial hype, surpassing virtually all expectations en route to becoming one of her genre’s biggest breakouts.

This an indie record for the ages, a wonderful listen where each song is completely essential to the project as a whole. Midnight is an incredible record, owing, but in no way indebted to her pitch perfect partnership with Toledo, one that’s further catapulted by Chura’s distinctive voice and extraordinary songwriting chops.

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“Close the door to your mouth and get the fuck in the car!” It’s an order that Stef Chura half sings, half-speaks halfway through the chugging “Method Man,” a big fat rock song that embodies the rattle and swagger of the Detroit artist’s sophomore release “Midnight”, itself a big fat rock record that staggers and struts like a drunk trying to walk straight, its riffs as sticky as a dive bar’s beer-sloshed floor and Chura’s delightful yips and yodels bearing the slurry quality of just a few too many bottles of Bud. Though the record has its straightforward moments —“Lemme do a jumping jack over your heart,” implores Chura on giddy number “Jumping Jack”—this is not pop and the medicine isn’t going doing easy and rarely in less than 2 minutes. Like the old rock records of yore, Midnight rewards repeat listening, the better to savor the ways Chura and Will Toledo find to reshape her loosey-goosey song structures into songs with edges as sharp and polished as diamonds.

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Though Chura’s always been a creative, exciting guitarist, she’s equally as inventive with her vocals on Midnight.  On the chorus of tightly wound “Scream,” she sings, “If only you could hear me scream!” three times in a row, changing the inflection of the final word so it sounds like “scram” or “scree-yum,” playfully expounding upon the possibilities of language while her fingers explore the boundaries of the electric guitar. “My girl is 3-dimensional,” exclaims Chura joyfully on “3D girl,” and she is.

End Your Week With Stef Chura's Beautifully Melancholic Single "Sour Honey"

“If only you could hear me scream,” Stef Chura sings at one point during her sophomore release, “Sweet Sweet Midnight”, her first full length album release for Saddle Creek Records. She makes good on her promise and does quite a bit of screaming throughout, even channeling a modern DIY Karen O at times. Produced by Car Seat Headrest’s Will Toledo, “Midnight” takes everything you love from his band and applies it to Chura’s transfixing voice, a perfect match for this rising act from Detroit. She’s long been building up buzz in the indie rock community; Sweet Sweet Midnight may launch her to stardom, a jump that’s been long overdue.

“For most people who create art I would assume there is some kind of deep unanswerable hole in your soul as to why you’re making it…” So says Stef Chura ahead of the release of her gritty, vehement new album – recorded and produced by Will Toledo ofCar Seat Headrestand her first new collection of songs . Illuminating that search for answers with a fevered sense of exploration, Midnight is a bold leap forward from Messes, Stef’s contagious debut album, with every aspect of her new work finding bold ways to express itself as it rips through twelve restless and relentless new tracks.

A couple of years on from the release of Messes, Stef is still based in Detroit, that most singular city which has seen it all, from the no-mans-land of its initial collapse through to the resurgent place it is now. Stef found inspiration from the people she surrounded with herself with, more so than the place itself. It’s no surprise that Midnight is testament to those kind of characteristics; a rugged and robust burst of defiance. “I’m usually dealing with the context of what I can’t say or haven’t said,” . “This album has a depth to it and a particular sound because of Will,” Stef states regarding Toledo’s input, whose spiky nuances can be found across the length and breadth of Midnight, the record presenting an exhilarating rush of sound and colour as Stef’s spirited vocal finds and signature guitar sounds unravel alongside in a thrilling meeting of ideas and influences; dispelling demons, song by song.

“With this album I wanted it to be clearer and more listenable, in a number of ways,” Stef says. Proof of this outlook can be found on the edgy lead track ‘Method Man’, a boisterous three-minutes that melds jagged, skewed guitars with a distinctive voice that has a new-found sense of confidence, whether spitting spoken-word mantras during the exhilarating percussive coda or simply letting loose amid the squalling bluster of guitars.

You can find it elsewhere too, in fact it runs right through the heart of Midnight’s twelve tracks. Take the sweeping brilliance of ‘Jumpin’ Jack’, a somewhat more refined three-minutes that bursts into a thrilling finale, or ‘Sincerely Yours’, a brooding four-minutes initially gives deserved space to Stef’s voice and words more than ever before, before bursting into life with with a pent-up energy that positively roars from within.

Equal parts thrilling and angsty, Midnight is a testament to the collaborative process, a record that makes the very most of those who came together to make it, but more than that, it’s a firm statement of tenacity and perseverance, of not resting on your laurels but leaping forwards no matter the situation you find yourself in. From out of one day and into the next.

The Detroit-native indie rocker Stef Chura also released a Record Store Day release on April 21st. The song, titled “Sour Honey,” follows the double-sided vinyl’s previous release, a-side “Degrees.” Check out that first track’s lyric video below

Stef Chura – the album Midnight out June 7th!

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“‘They’ll Never’ picks up where its predecessor ‘Method’ left off, combining grunge-y guitar with a surf rock sort of fervency. In this same manner, its visual counterpart (dir. Fidel R Ruiz-Healy & Tyler Walker) follows suit, meshing the bright with the dirty, the colorful with the muted and dilapidated.”

This June, the underrated Stef Chura is releasing her sophomore album, Midnight. We’ve already heard its incisive lead single “Method Man.” For its follow-up, Chura falls back into the twangy spark that filled the Michigan musician’s 2017 debut. “They’ll never tear this place apart,” she sings, a song that both romanticizes and repudiates the place that Chura called home.

She explains:

I wrote this song while living in a building in Ypsilanti, MI that was not up to code. No one cared about it. The kitchen was moldy, the carpets were dirty and the house was generally unfinished. This place existed in an odd realm. “Sideways from grace the angles lost” This means that at a certain angle and in the right light you can see what is amiss. No one really cared for it, and yet people would go on living in it and subsequently it would be a home. No one cared enough to take care of it and no one cared enough to notice it and destroy it or hold the people who lived there accountable for keeping it up to code.

It’s also about looking into the future, that when life hands you less and circumstances aren’t what you thought they were. “They sold you love, this chalk’s just dust.” Wanting something you can’t have. Having expectations that don’t go the way you think they should. How what you bought isn’t in the box and you have to start over. There is only a memory of what is left represented by a shell of what was there. A conversation on how you can never really own anything. And life goes on even if your house is moldy and you don’t speak the same language as the drunk old man you live with who steals your potted plants and plants them in the yard for you.

Stef ChuraThey’ll Never

Arriving in the early months of 2017, Bonny Doon’s self-titled debut was a warm introduction to the Detroit quartet for many. Hazy and bright, the album’s woozy melodies and swirling webs of summery guitar textures were easily ingested as low-key slacker pop, blissfully awash in lo-fi sensibilities and dreamy ambiance. But the nonchalant breeziness belied a serious attention to songcraft that beckoned careful listening, and hinted at depths yet unexplored. Lo and behold, before the ink was even dry on the first record, work had already begun on its follow-up Longwave, a conscious about-face from the sonic experimentation of the first album, and a journey inward.

Opting for spontaneity and simplicity over the exploration of layers and textures that defined the first record, the band architected an incredibly intimate sound for these new songs. The album was tracked with minimal overdubs or production flourishes, constructing a frame that is spare and understated. The songs on Longwave amble through moonlit fields of melancholy guitar leads and self-reflection, the collection unfolding almost as one uninterrupted conversation with self. The session aimed to capture the band at their essence. With the superfluous stripped away, a gentle but steadfast spiritual core is revealed as the backbone of Bonny Doon’s cosmic American music.

Bobby Colombo of Bonny Doon said, “When you – if you – listen to our music, there’s a lot of self-critique and doubt, and questioning. That could be construed as negativity – I don’t think we do, though.” That kind of self-awareness is self-evident, and is the theme behind Longwave‘s ten tracks. But for an album full of wistfully declarative, introspective sentences, Bonny Doon left ample room for their take on spaced-out, captivating, catchy music. This one-two punch – confidence in self-doubt, and a strolling groove – helped Longwave arrive as one of the most fully-formed debuts this side of the millennium, and demanded repeated listens, both this year and beyond.

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Released March 23rd, 2018

Bill Lennox- vocals and guitar
Bobby Colombo– vocals and guitar
Jake Kmiecik– drums
Joshua Brooks– bass

MC5 were one of the most radical bands of the ’60s. Their first album, the live Kick Out the Jams, committed some of the most energetic and aggressive performances of any musicians to record. The band, which formed in Detroit in 1964, influenced how everything from punk to metal to hard rock has sounded over the past half-century. For that alone, they deserve a spot in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Their live album Kick Out the Jams opens with singer Rob Tyner encouraging the audience to join the “revolution.” Even if the revolution didn’t happen while they played,  the band meant what it said. The members all had ties to the White Panther Party (their “manager,” John Sinclair, was a founding member) and performed concerts in protest of the Vietnam War. They even played at the infamous 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

While MC5 may not have been the first band to say the word “fuck” on an album, they definitely used it most effectively. The song “Kick Out the Jams” starts with a rallying cry by Rob Tyner to “Kick out the jams, motherfuckers!” Those famous words complement the relentless proto-punk assault found on the rest of the album.

MC5’s first studio album, 1970’s Back in the USA, predicted the affection for late-‘50s and early ’60s rock ‘n’ roll that punk groups like the Ramones celebrated years later. The 11-song album is only 28 minutes long (this was 1970, a time when 28 minutes would have been about normal for one track by other underground artists) and features short covers of Chuck Berry and Little Richard songs. Their live performances were even closer to punk; onstage, the band encouraged audiences to join them in political protest, all the while creating some of the most abrasive music of its time. Many punk bands cite them as an influence. Guitarist Wayne Kramer’s drug charges are even mentioned in the Clash’s “Jail Guitar Doors.”

Aside from his vocal talents, singer Rob Tyner was known for his awesome hair. Tyner had one of the largest afros in 1969. When coupled with the eclectic fashion of the late ’60s, all the members created a strong image on and off stage.

More than 50 years later, the group’s surviving members (guitarist Wayne Kramer and drummer Dennis Thompson) continue to perform. The band has reunited a few times, though each reunion had been cut short by the death of a member. Kramer, along with British singer-songwriter Billy Bragg, worked together on the Jail Guitar Doors Initiative — named after the Clash song that referenced Kramer — which provides instruments to inmates. In 2018, Kramer spearheaded the MC50 tour that included members of Soundgarden and Fugazi, among others.

MC5 – (Motor City 5) Motorcity is burning 1969

Matthew Dear doesn’t call himself King Chameleon lightly. The Texan-born producer, DJ, sometime University of Michigan lecturer and leftfield electronic artist has spent almost 20 years operating under a range of pseudonyms – Audion, Jabberjaw and False. The fifth album under his own name is no different, but mostly he channels an eclectic range of loosely post-punk-era styles into heavy electronics. Cranium-shattering dub, Nitzer Ebb’s electronic body music, Wire’s angular tunefulness and the Pop Group’s depth-charges of dub and punk are hurled into the mix.

“Some bands have retired and come back in the amount of time since my last album. Hell, I’ve even played a part in making two more humans since Beams. But hey old man, why aren’t I rested? .Well, I DJ’d a lot, put out an Audion album, and submitted a DJ Kicks mix to some time capsule confused aliens will crack open somewhere far down the line. Throughout it all, as has been the case since I was 14, I made loads of weirdo music. If it weren’t digital, there’d be boxes of tapes and tapes and tapes. See, that’s the thing. I’m a tinkerer. I’m a loop obsessed sound hack. The process is what I get out of bed for.

“‘I make music for people who like my music’ is something I recently tweeted. There is something I’ve come to love about my career. I really can do whatever I want. So long as I feel it’s the best use of time, or yields results that translate into good music later. That’s where you’ll find the music dad. It’s in my head. It’s on my hard drives. It’s in my car driving the girls to school in the morning. They even asked me how Tegan and Sara snuck in and out of the house without them noticing to make those songs with me. The music is always there. It’s just a matter of time before it starts to bubble over and finally get stamped ‘property of the people.’

“I’m calling this one ‘Bunny’ dad. As always it’s got a little bit of everything that makes me who I am. Why Bunny? Fundamentally, I love the way the word looks and sounds. I love the way it rolls off the mind and onto the tongue. It’s a funny thing too. Bunnies are cute. Bunnies are weird. They’re soft. They’re sexy. They’re lucky. They wildly procreate. They trick hunters, but get tricked by turtles. They lead you down holes. They adorn the headboards of children’s beds, lined up meticulously just as mom did when she was your age. Bunnies are seemingly with us from birth, and probably skitter past on our way out the big door.

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“So here is my album. Already a fading stamp on the passport of a time traveler. I do it all for you. I couldn’t quit if I wanted to. I’m only getting started.” – Matthew Dear

released October 12th, 2018

MC5 only released three albums, but they were ferocious, adventurous, and confrontational enough to secure the group’s place as one of the greatest rock ’n’ roll bands ever. Singer Rob Tyner, guitarists Wayne Kramer and Fred “Sonic” Smith, bassist Michael Davis, and drummer Dennis Thompson came together as the MC5 in 1965. The band performed for several years before making its first record. This year is the 50th anniversary of the recording of the band’s incendiary debut, Kick Out The Jams, which was recorded live over two nights at Detroit’s Grande Ballroom in October 1968.

To celebrate, MC5 release Total Assault: 50th Anniversary Collection, a limited-edition boxed set that features all three of the band’s albums pressed on coloured vinyl. It includes Kick Out The Jams (red vinyl), Back In The USA (white vinyl) and High Time (blue vinyl). The albums come in sleeves that faithfully re-create the original releases, including gatefolds for Kick Out The Jams and High Times. All three are housed in a hard slipcase with new art and previously unseen photographs by world renowned photographer Raeanne Rubenstein. The music on Total Assault shows why the MC5 is held is such high regard today with indelible tracks like Kick Out The Jams, Human Being Lawnmower and Sister Anne.

The set also includes a new essay by Creem magazine founding editor/writer and Uncut contributor Jaan Uhelszki, who writes: “Turned loose on a bare stage, the MC5 were among the most awe-inspiring perpetrators of sheer bombast and rock and roll brinkmanship alive… They tore through the stuff they heard on the radio with a fierce intensity that transcended the original artists’ intent. Tunes by James Brown, Chuck Berry, the Kinks and the Rolling Stones vibrated at a higher frequency when the Motor City Five tackled them.”

MC5 co-founder and guitarist Wayne Kramer will release his memoir The Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, the MC5, and My Life of Impossibilities on August 14th before hitting the road with a new all-star line-up of MC5 called MC50. The group will perform Kick Out The Jams in its entirety, along with other MC5 classics.

The Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, The MC5, and My Life of Impossibilities by [Kramer, Wayne]

In the late 1960s, Wayne Kramer and his brothers in the radical Detroit punk group MC5 launched a heroic high energy rock and roll assault on US culture in an attempt to bring down the government with a gonzoid manifesto of ‘dope, rock and roll and fucking in the streets’ … Their revolution ended in chaos after being kicked off two record labels and culminating in the band breaking up, with members descending into heroin addiction and imprisonment. The MC5s never had a hit record, but the three classic albums that they made – and their impassioned philosophy and mythology – inspired bands like the Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Ramones, and Johnny Thunders, all the way through to Julian Cope, The Cult, and Primal Scream.

Here, for the first time ever on the page, is the inside story of one of the most chaotic and revered bands of all time: a band of brothers from Detroit who – like The Stooges – transformed the power of rock ‘n roll into a revolutionary force.

A rollicking account…from his rough upbringing in post-war Detroit, to his transformation from greaser guitarist to rock ‘n’ roll revolutionary.”–MOJO
“Relives those energising days of the late ’60s, when Detroit’s MC5 mixed rock and revolution with free jazz and exceptional hair…An inspiring and redemptive tale.”–UncutWayne Kramer’s story is an incredible tale of rock ‘n’ roll redemption. The MC5 crystallized the ’60s counterculture movement at its most volatile and basically invented punk rock music. But Wayne’s life proved to be as chaotic as his groundbreaking guitar playing. Rogue, rascal, rebel, revolutionary, artist, addict, inmate, poet, prisoner, and now proud papa, Brother Wayne Kramer is one of the wisest people I know, and he has earned that wisdom the hard way. The world needs to know this man’s story. Here it is.”–Tom Morello, guitarist of Rage Against the Machine, Audioslave, and Prophets of Rage

Wayne Kramer is the biggest badass in rock ‘n’ roll. Period. And The Hard Stuff proves it. Between these covers is a story of survival, talent, madness, dope, guts, and a sheer, fearless commitment to bringing straight-up enlightenment to this fascist, prison-happy nation we happen to inhabit–even if it meant putting his own freedom, and his own unbelievably epic life, on the line. This just may be the best memoir of the year.”–Jerry Stahl, author of I, Fatty and Permanent Midnight

MC5 fans will relish the opportunity to hear Kramer’s version of events from the band’s history...The Hard Stuff’s lesson is an inspirational one: no matter how far you fall, circumstances can arise which lead you to a better place. Plus it’s just wildly entertaining.”–Midnight to Six

“Often harrowing, sometimes hilarious and always compelling.”–Buffalo News

“The MC5 are the ultimate cult band: a rebellious group from late-1960s Detroit whose raw, proto-punk take on rock’n’roll influenced everyone from the Sex Pistols to Primal Scream. They never made it, though, and when you read this memoir by the guitarist and leader Wayne Kramer, you begin to see why. The Hard Stuff can be read as a manual of how not to become a rock star. Drugs, band feuds, jail and radical politics all combined to prevent stardom. This is a story of bad luck and bad behaviour in equal measure.”–Times of London

“There’s nothing like an autobiography when it comes to really digging deep. Kramer’s The Hard Stuff does exactly that. It’s simultaneously brutally honest, heartbreaking, hilarious, and life-affirming…It’s a frankly wonderful read.”–Detroit Metro Times

“A gritty rock memoir detailing a cult American band’s fall from grace and its subsequent determination not to get up…Gripping and sobering…A manual of how not to be in a band.”–Wanted Online

“He defied death, drugs and detention. Now MC5 legend Wayne Kramer has written an equally full-on memoir…Eye-opening…Wide-ranging…His journey from fatherless child to musical maverick to junkie to upstanding survivor reads like a history of the late 20th century.”–The Observer

Wayne Kramer, legendary guitarist and co-founder of quintessential Detroit proto-punk legends The MC5, tells his story in The Hard Stuff.

Image result for NEIL YOUNG - " Fox Theatre Detroit " 3rd July 2018

On July 3rd, Neil Young live-streamed a solo acoustic show from the Fox Theatre in Detroit that didn’t go completely as planned. Audience members, perhaps fueled by 4th of July celebrations, disrupted the performance, shouting at the 72-year-old singer as he played and spoke from the stage.

Neil Young brought his brief six-date solo acoustic tour to Detroit’s Fox Theatre , choosing the venue in part because of his love for the city and the venue.  He took the stage surrounded by a circle of guitars, a banjo, and a ukulele, and launched into a batch of primarily early ’70s chestnuts on string instruments. Then, atypically, he took a spin playing a number of songs on the three different pianos and pump organ on stage.

The Detroit News reported fans treated the “deeply personal and intimate” concert “like a rollicking Crazy Horse show in an arena or an amphitheater, yelling out for song titles … or just bellowing Young’s name so frequently that it ruined the vibe of the evening.”  Fans, however kept yelling out song titles (“HARVEST MOOOOOOOON!”) or bellowing Young’s name (“NEEEEEEEEEIIIIIIIIIIILLLLLLLLLLL!”) so frequently that it ruined the vibe of the evening.

The show brings up questions of concert etiquette and what kind of behavior is expected of concert audiences.

When it comes to concert couth, it’s usually younger audiences that are accused of being bad fans. They won’t put their phones away, they’re more concerned with being seen by their peers than living in the moment, etc. But those moments, though they may affect an individual’s participation, rarely disrupt from the overall experience of a concert.

The Neil Young situation was different. Very early in the evening, amid a flurry of song titles being shouted in his direction, Young shot back, “I hope you know I’m not keeping track of those.” That didn’t stop the fans from peppering him with requests. “CINNAMON GIRL!” “ROCKIN’ IN THE FREE WORLD!”

“You can keep shouting them, but I’m never going to play any of them,” Young is reported to have replied.

The incident seemed to rattle the usually impervious Young, who took to his blog on the Neil Young Archives website to discuss what he termed a “rough night.”

“It was the 4th of July holiday and some folks were celebrating, already high when they arrived at the show,” he wrote. “Because it was a holiday, I could see it coming. They were focused on their celebration, kind of like a festival. Any subtle solo performance of songs is very challenged under those conditions.”

It’s apparent that Young believes those in the Detroit audience who came to actually listen got a subpar performance from him. “I could slip deeply into a song if not distracted,” he noted, “but I am just relegated to the surface while fighting off distraction, and so is the rest of the audience. Likewise, I may have told a story that sets up the experience of listening to the song, if I was not interrupted while trying.”

He did, according manage to speak about playing Detroit’s Chess Mate coffeehouse, and writing songs in the White Castle restaurant across the street. He also played Buffalo Springfield’s classic “Broken Arrow” on piano, as well as “After the Goldrush” on pump organ and “I Am a Child” on his Martin D45 guitar — what Young called “some very fine and engaged moments.”

“There were some songs that shone through in spite of the obstacles and I am very happy they did,” Young noted, adding that he hoped to one day return to Detroit to a more receptive, less disruptive audience and give them a more fully engaged performance.

“Every time I got through this type of experience, part of me does not ever want to go through it again,” he wrote, “yet it is a risk taken every time I walk out to a solo stage.”

The Tuesday Young show at the FoxTheatre had been billed as “Neil Young Solo,” and found the 72-year-old to be performing by himself, mostly acoustic, in a deeply personal and intimate setting.

Very simply, it wasn’t that kind of show. The concert was a journey through Young’s career, and he told stories about his early days in Detroit and his memories of performing and recording in the city. But several times he wasn’t able to get through stories because fans were shouting and acting like jackasses. “Just pretend like I just told a story,” he said at one point midway through the concert, because by then he’d been shouted over so often that it was no longer worth trying.

I can’t recall attending another concert where the rowdy, unruly behavior of the crowd affected a show quite like the Neil Young crowd did, quoted local newsman.

It’s not just Neil Young, the same situation when Jackson Browne played Freedom Hill earlier this summer, Is there a generation gap when it comes to concert norms that leads to a feeling of entitlement by concertgoers of a certain age? That they paid their money and they can yell out whatever they want, whenever they want? Or is the bad behavior symptomatic of a larger breakdown of respect for others in today’s America?

To be fair, at Neil Young it was a case of a few ruining it for everyone, which is often the case in many disturbances, be it at a concert or a public gathering of any sort. And those few are either too ignorant, too belligerent or too male to empathize with others or realize the effect they’re having on everyone else. And too often it’s the few who dictate things for the many.

Neil Young knows his name, yelling “NEIL!” or “UNCLE NEIL!” isn’t going to cause any grand epiphany for him. He knows you love him, that’s why you paid to come see the show. And he knows his songs, shouting “MY MY, HEY HEYYY!” isn’t going to remind him that he sings a song called “My My, Hey Hey” and get him to play it for you.

So once that is established, what is the point of continuing to yell out? Is it the thirst for a reply? And is getting some acknowledgment worth ruining the experience for so many concertgoers around you?

Neil Young
2018-07-03
Fox Theatre, Detroit, Michigan, USA
Solo

01. On The Way Home (acoustic guitar)
02. Homefires (acoustic guitar)
03. Only Love Can Break Your Heart (acoustic guitar)
04. Love Is A Rose (acoustic guitar)
05. Cowgirl In The Sand (acoustic guitar)
06. Mellow My Mind (banjo)
07. Ohio (electric guitar)
08. There’s A World (piano)
09. Broken Arrow (piano) [first solo piano version ever – stunning]
10. I Am A Child (acoustic guitar)
11. Are You Ready For The Country? (piano)
12. Tonight’s The Night (piano)
13. Speakin’ Out (piano)
14. After The Gold Rush (pump organ)
15. Angry World (electric guitar)
16. Love And War (acoustic guitar)
17. Peaceful Valley Boulevard (acoustic guitar)
18. Out On The Weekend (acoustic guitar)
19. The Needle And The Damage Done (acoustic guitar)
20. Heart Of Gold (acoustic guitar)

21. Tumbleweed (acoustic guitar)

By attending a concert, like any public gathering, you enter into a social contract. The same way you wouldn’t sit down at a restaurant and scream the chef’s name after biting into the pasta primavera, you shouldn’t shout out things at a concert if it’s not that kind of show. Read the room and act accordingly. At an arena rock concert, all bets are off, the louder you are the better. But if a concert is a quiet acoustic gathering, keep the loud comments to yourself for the sake of those around you.