Posts Tagged ‘Transgressive Records’

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“I want the power in my music to come from lyrics and melody rather than trickery of the brain,” Marika Hackman said back in 2015, just before the release of her full-length debut We Slept At Last. Fast forward four years and one more album, and the singer-songwriter continues to live up to this promise on late single “i’m not where you are,” all about “breaking up with people, or self-sabotaging relationships,” as Hackman explains in a statement. Between her sultry, languorous delivery and synths that are at once toe-tapping and melancholic, the English artist once again crafts a powerful melody with lyrics that reveal a fraught emotional underbelly. Hackman adds that “i’m not where you are” meditates on “[t]hat feeling of not trusting one’s emotions because you can’t seem to get to the same place as the other person. On the surface, it seems like an arrogant ‘everybody falls in love with me’ kind of song but it’s actually incredibly lonely, introspective and self-deprecating.”

British singer/songwriter Marika Hackman is releasing a new album, Any Human Friend, on August 9th via Sub Pop. This week shared another song from the album titled, “the one,” which was the first song written for Any Human Friend.

It also might be Hackman’s catchiest song to date. In a press release Hackman concurs, saying “the one” is “probably the poppiest song I’ve ever written. I loved the idea of inhabiting this ridiculous arrogant rock star character who has totally fucked their career by writing too many sad songs.”

Previously she shared the album’s first single “i’m not where you are”

Any Human Friend is the follow-up to her 2017-released breakthrough release, sophomore album I’m Not Your Man. Hackman co-produced the album with David Wrench (Frank Ocean, The xx, Let’s Eat Grandma).

In a previous press release Hackman summed up the album this way: “This whole record is me diving into myself and peeling back the skin further and further, exposing myself in quite a big way. It can be quite sexual. It’s blunt, but not offensive. It’s mischievous.”

Hackman added: “I’m a hopeless romantic. I search for love and sexual experience, but also I’m terrified by it.”

Hackman is unabashed about tackling these themes, even if her only family is a little less enthused. “I sent ‘all night’ to my parents and they were quite shocked,” she said in the press release. “Why does it sound shocking coming out of my mouth? Women have sex with each other, and it seems to me we aren’t as freely allowed to discuss that as men are. But at no point am I disrespecting the women I’m having sex with. It can be fucking sexy without banging people over the head with a frying pan. It’s sexy sex.”

Out now on AMF / Sub Pop Published by Transgressive Records Ltd.

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Crushing   album artwork

Julia Jacklin followed up her strong and promising 2016 debut, Don’t Let The Kids Winwith something decidedly different: A chill, laidback indie rock trio album with some buddies under the name Phantastic Ferniture. The album was unfairly overlooked by most folks, but had a shaggy, loose vibe that, when paired with Jacklin’s songwriting wit and floating voice, made it impossible to ignore once you heard it.Jacklin’s solo again with “Crushing” her sophomore LP as a solo act, and neither of her previous albums could have prepared anyone for this: Crushing is an organs-on-the-table dissection of a breakup, absolutely harrowing and wrenching in its lyrical specificity and its openness. Crushing’s 10 songs examine the tumultuous waves present in each breakup. Separating in a relationship is not linear; it comes in wave after crushing wave. The anger gives way to sadness gives way to regret gives way to trying to forget them gives way to grim acceptance. Jacklin captures it all in Crushing.

Crushing opens with “Body,” a song recounting an apparently real fight with her boyfriend over him getting kicked off a flight for smoking in the bathroom, culminating in her wondering if he’ll use the nude photos he took of her to hurt her in the future. “I’m gonna leave you / I’m not a good woman when you’re around” Jacklin sings solemnly over the trace drumbeat and a strummed guitar, capturing so much with so little, the hallmark of Jacklin’s songwriting.

The album rolls like the cover of Unknown Pleasures through the feelings post-breakup, often accompanied by instrumentation that matches the ups and downs. “When the Family Flies In,” which ends with a pained ponderance over the music video she sent her ex the last time they talked, is all piano, and dulcet tones, while “Pressure to Party,” a song about wanting to force yourself out into society after the breakup, but taking the time before trying to love again soon, is upbeat, shredding and shouty. Crushing, as much as it is a breakup album, is also a showcase for how varied Jacklin’s songwriting has become in the last three years; she can do loosely tied indie rock and piano ballads and acoustic campfire songs and gruff tell offs effortlessly in a row here.

Crushing’s arc is one of reclamation; through these songs, Jacklin is able to regain some control over her body, how she wants to be loved, and her own headspace.

The album closes with a personal affirmation and a confirmation that she’s ready to let go. “I’ll be OK / I’ll be alright / I’ll get well soon / sleep through the night / don’t know how you’re doing, but that’s what I get / I can’t be the one to hold you, when I was the one who left,” she sings quietly over a Chemtrail guitar line. Crushing might be the story of Jacklin’s personal breakup, but it’s also her most universal record; it’s a salve for when you’re in the pit of a breakup and eventually you’ll get a hold of yourself, try the restaurant your ex always wanted to go to, say “fuck them,” and move on.

Produced by Burke Reid (Courtney Barnett, Liam Finn) and recorded at The Grove Studios, Crushing sets Jacklin’s understated defiance against a raw yet luminous sonic backdrop. New album ‘Crushing’ will be out February 22nd

Hippo Campus Bambi cover artwork

Hippo Campus are perfectly awkward with their new album Bambi set to be released September 28th through Transgressive Records and produced be BJ Burton (Bon Iver, Low). Guitarist Jake Luppen stated that part of their album was shaped by the #Metoo, mental health issues, and toxic masculinity. “That (#metoo) really made us take a look at how toxic masculinity has influenced the way we see ourselves and the world overall, in the past, we might have been apprehensive about being super-vulnerable, but now we’re more aware of how important it is to come forward about dealing with depression or anxiety. Because if more men are able to do that, they might be less likely to express those feelings as anger or violence.”

This drift from the status quo is apparent throughout the album. It’s playful and quirky, but with a vulnerability that lies in the fragile melodies and honest lyrics. They’re stretching, moving, and expanding what our society considers to be masculine. Bambi is unexpected, and once you get into a beat, it changes. It’ll have you bobbing your head to bubble sounds and loud glitches.

Hippo Campus has given us an album we can listen to while we test new waters, take an emotional journey, and find new parts of ourselves.

“Thunder Follows The Light” contemplates the ongoing destruction of the outer world and how it shapes the storms of our inner ones. There are meditations on the environment, collective struggle, death, rebirth, reasons to believe it’s worth the fight.
For nearly a decade, Jordan Lee has crafted pop experiments blending orchestral instrumentation and ambient electronic sounds. “Thunder Follows the Light” is a testament to the power of music as a space for collective processing and emotional response. Like his other releases, it is a highly collaborative document. Its sprawling chamber folk features many returning collaborators—violinist Jake Falby, guitarist Mike Clifford, percussionist Dillon Zahner—as well as first-time players—vocalist Johanne Swanson (of Yohuna), drummer Felix Walworth (of Told Slant), saxophonist Gabriel Birnbaum (of Wilder Maker). Jordan can honestly do no wrong. He is absolutely growing and maturing musically before our very ears, and I for one am honored to be a part of it. Finishing an album is such a huge endeavor that I always feel like it leaves a permanent mark on me. I’m glad for what this process has taught me and am excited to live in this little universe for a while and play these songs around the world!

Lee’s aggressive pursuit of art-making for himself is empathetic and outward-facing, looking both to the past and the future with warmth and hopefulness. “Peace is more than just a season coming ‘round again,” he sings on two different songs—and the emphasis seems intentional: suggesting that harmony of the mind and the heart do not just transpire but must be worked for, growing from deep-rooted foundations. In the world that birthed Thunder Follows the Light, it feels like medicine.
Released September 21st, 2018
Written by Jordan Lee 
With writing contributions from
Mike Clifford, Jake Falby, and Dillon Zahner 

‘Come To Pass’ appears on the album ‘Thunder Follows The Light’ out 21 September 2018 through Transgressive Records

Mutual Benefit shares new couplet of tracks, “Shedding Skin” and “Come To Pass”

Multi-instrumentalist Jordan Lee, aka Mutual Benefit, has shared another duo of tracks that follow from the first couplet “New History”, and “Storm Cellar Heart”.

Having announced his forthcoming album at the same time as the first two tracks, today Lee shares the second wave of singles, “Shedding Skin” and “Come To Pass”.

His forthcoming album Thunder Follows The Light will consist of tracks accumulated over the past two years and will hold both returning and new collaborators.

On the first of two, “Come To Pass”, Lee states, “These songs came about at the same time on a busted 5 string guitar when I shut off my phone and declared my bedroom a makeshift, artist residency for a week. I had just returned from a tour that did a lot of meandering around the Appalachian Mountain region right as the “Make America Great Again” signs started popping up more and more. “Come to Pass” is a refutation of the idea that there was ever a golden age to return back to. Both personally and politically I’m afraid of this sort of constructed nostalgia that keeps us looking backwards instead of a having a powerful enough imagination to see the hard truths of the present but work towards a better future.”

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On the second track “Shedding Skin”, Lee explains, “I kept thinking about a town where I saw hundreds of these translucent cicada bodies from where they had clung to a tree, hardened, and then burst out of their own shell. This ghostly sight made me pay more attention to how things naturally regenerate, how loss is part of the fuel of growth. It became a powerful reminder that things shouldn’t stay the same, including parts of ourselves.”
Thunder Follows The Light is due out 21st September via Transgressive on all platforms, including a special edition vinyl. Mutual Benefit has announced a UK and US tour that sees him play London’s Oslo on 30 October.

Lets Eat Grandma

Let’s Eat Grandma release their second and stunning album, I’m All Ears, via Transgressive Records. I’m All Ears is an even greater revelation than Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingworth’s globally acclaimed debut, I, Gemini. The second act from the British teenage vocalists, multi-instrumentalists and songwriters, is the most startling, infectious, innovative and thrilling record you’ll hear this year. It is alive with furious pop, unapologetic grandeur, intimate ballads; with loops, Logic, outrageous 80s drum solos, as well as production from David Wrench (The xx / Frank Ocean / Caribou), SOPHIE (famed for her own material and work with Madonna, Charli XCX and Vince Staples) and Faris Badwan (The Horrors). It’s an album that cements Let’s Eat Grandma as one of the most creative and exciting bands in the world right now.

The finale of Let’s Eat Grandma’s intoxicating, expansive second album I’m All Ears is the intricate 11-minute drama “Donnie Darko”—named, of course, for the 2001 film that has become a byword for suburban teenage angst. Director Richard Kelly served that familiar emotion with a hefty side of disturbing magical realism; nothing is quite as it seems, but emotions run high.

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“We watched Donnie Darko while we were still writing our first album, years ago,” explains Jenny Hollingworth, one half of the U.K. duo, alongside Rosa Walton. “We weren’t writing about the film—there’s nothing about giant rabbits—but it was an inspiration, especially the part when [Donnie’s] run over. Some of the themes match some of ours: [being] a teenager, navigating the world, and things being ambiguous. Even in terms of the sounds on the album, it just made sense.”

Hollingworth and Walton have been best friends since kindergarten, and bandmates from the age of 13. They put out their first album when Walton was just 16 and Hollingworth 17—astonishing, given their debut’s musical and lyrical range.

Let’s Eat Grandma – It’s Not Just Me (Official Video) The song will be on our second album ‘I’m All Ears’ which is coming out 29th June 2018,

Let’s Eat Grandma – Hot Pink (Official Music Video) The song will be on our second album ‘I’m All Ears’ which is coming out 29 June 2018,

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St. Paul, Minnesota indie foursome Hippo Campus have dropped their first new material since last autumn’s ‘warm glow’ EP and earlier ‘Landmark’ full-length.

Titled ‘Passenger’, the stand-alone track is out now via Transgressive Records.

Passenger was written in the winter of 2017 after the first four months of touring on landmark,” says singer/guitarist Jake Luppen. “Lyrically the themes deal with the challenges of growing alongside the person you love. For this song in particular I tried to challenge myself to write a more complex chord progression to sing to. I started off with a TR-8 groove and the rest followed pretty naturally.”

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The duo behind British electropop group Let’s Eat Grandma were just 17 when its debut, I, Gemini, came out two years ago to wide acclaim. Lifelong friends Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingsworth found themselves thrown into the spotlight, and the upcoming I’m All Ears reflects that transformative experience. Hooky early singles “Falling Into Me” and “It’s Not Just Me” feel wider in scope than the group’s earlier work, with layers of synthesizers and sounds reflecting their increased ambition. It also helps to have producers like Sophie (Madonna, Charli XCX), David Wrench (The xx, Frank Ocean), and Faris Badwan (The Horrors), which should make I’m All Ears a big step forward for the duo.

Let’s Eat Grandma – It’s Not Just Me (Official Video) The song will be on our second album ‘I’m All Ears’ which is coming out 29th June 2018,

We’re so excited to introduce you a new band fronted by the wonderful singer songwriter Julia Jackin and the newest signing to Transgressive Records the band are called Phantastic Ferniture! with Julia taking vocal duties Julia Jacklin, who you hopefully know already, and is made up of old friends, Elizabeth Hughes (subject of the song Elizabeth on the album Don’t Let The Kids Win), Ryan K Brennan and Tom Stephens.

The music of Phantastic Ferniture is feel good and made for dancing, and their first song made available is out today – “Fuckin ‘n’ Rollin”Watch the video, filmed in Glebe’s Blackwattle Bay below.

They’ll be releasing their debut, self-titled, album on 27th July through Transgressive Records

Boniface

Named after the neighbourhood in Winnipeg where he grew up as a bored teen learning as many instruments as he could get his hands on, Micah Visser released his brilliantly titled debut single I Will Not Return As A Tourist last year on Transgressive Records imprint ParadYse. Mixing Death Cab-esque poetic despair across an unstoppable backdrop of searing harmonic power, his songs are wonderfully bleak and heartbreaking.