Posts Tagged ‘Sub Pop Records’

Frankie Cosmos is the musical pseudonym for Greta Kline, the daughter of Kevin Kline and Phoebe Cates. Since 2012, Kline has been releasing an impressive catalogue of lo-fi, often endearing indie-rock songs. “Close it Quietly” is her second full-length to be released by celebrated label Sub Pop and it marks a huge step forward. Indeed, these 21 songs in just under 40 minutes make up her most substantial offering to date, without losing the original homespun appeal of her early records. Her quirky, conversational style is fully on display on “Cosmic Shop,” the sunny “Windows,” the tender and intimate “Marbles” and the key-standout closer, “This Swirling.” Kline possesses a quiet, unique cleverness that is worth finding.

Close it Quietly (Release day: September 6th, 2019)

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We don’t get enough indie rock prom ballads. There’s nothing revolutionary about Shannon Lay’s heart-rending new single “Blue.” It’s a slow, gorgeous love song. “I will love you till my hair turns blue,” Lay sings — calm, matter-of-fact, reassuring. Behind her, the guitars have just the right level of reverb and sustain. The contemplatively bluesy electric piano solo arrives at just the right moment. The key change kicks you in the heart, just the way you might hope it would. It’s a beautiful song that never tries to be anything other than a beautiful song. It’s six minutes long, and if it was longer, nobody would complain. You could slow dance to this song.

Shannon Lay’s new single “Blue” b/w “We Mend” (Released  December 12th, 2019) is available now on all streaming services and is a part of the latest edition of the iconic Sub Pop Singles Club series.

In May The Gotobeds – Cary, TFP, Eli and Gavin – return to the fray with their third full lengther, After 10 plus years in the underground, Sub Pop’s least-famous band made their best record yet with “Debt Begins At 30”, a fitting title for a record that isn’t afraid to sound its age or remind you of yours. Featuring contributions from a laundry list of fellow punk lifers, Debt Begins At 30 is a rollicking post-punk mixtape of sorts that still bears all the hallmarks of a Gotobeds record: thrashy guitars, loudmouthed politics, more guitars, and heaps of bitingly acerbic humor—this time, with even stronger songwriting and some studio polish that does nothing to dial down their inherent commitment to being the loudest band in the basement. And you’ve gotta give it up for a band with enough confidence to not only put the title track on the record twice, but let Victoria Ruiz of Downtown Boys, who takes vocal duties on the second go-round, rewrite the lyrics in Spanish when none of the band’s members actually speak the language.

Give me a minute or three to extol the virtues of The Gotobeds, the modern rock and roll sensation that has always sounded like they love to play. Never maligned by having the world’s weight on their backs,

Wolf Parade will release “Thin Mind”, the group’s fifth full-length, on January 24th worldwide through Sub Pop Records, with the exception of Canada through Royal Mountain Records. The ten-track album, which features the singles “Forest Green,” the previously released  “Against the Day,”  and “Julia Take Your Man Home,” was produced by John Goodmanson at Risque Disque on Vancouver Island, BC.

Every moment spent gazing at our screens is oversaturated with content, an ever-accelerated news cycle conditioning our ever-decreasing attention spans. The struggle to stay present, and to foresee a clear, sustainable future, feels very real. Wolf Parade address this phenomenon head-on with Thin Mind, the band’s 5th full-length and second to be produced by John Goodmanson (Bikini Kill, Sleater-Kinney, Unwound).

“Thin Mind” refers to the way that being around too much tech has made our focus thin,” says keyboardist Spencer Krug. “It’s opening one more page, scrolling one more thing,” adds guitarist Dan Boeckner, “and the weird, sort-of hollow automaton feeling that you get from it.”

“This record is very personal, but at the same time, we’re all coming from the same place of a general sense of anxiety,” says drummer Arlen Thompson. “How do you deal with the constant barrage of having your opinions swayed by all these different actors when you don’t know who they are or what their purpose is? There is no normal anymore.”

Thin Mind marks a return to the original power trio of Dan, Spencer, and Arlen, following multi-instrumentalist Dante DeCaro’s amicable departure from the group in 2018, after the conclusion of their world tour supporting Cry Cry Cry.

One month later, the trio got together at Risqué Disque, an old stone barn-turned-studio in the woods of Vancouver Island, to begin writing Thin Mind—emerging with an album about making sense of the present while reckoning with visions of the future

From the album Thin Mind (Release Date: January 24th, 2020

Enter Networker, the new album by Omni and first with indie giant Sub Pop Records. Their sound is still defined by sparse drums, locked-in bass, blistering guitar, and nonchalant, yet assured vocals, but from the first notes of “Sincerely Yours” you’ll immediately notice that Networker sounds much cleaner and more “HI-FI” than their prior two albums, Deluxe (2016) and Multi-task (2017). The departure in fidelity suits the new record and allows the listener to enjoy the nuances of their meticulous arrangements. Don’t worry, the riffs of Gang of Four and Wire are still present, but the production is more lush and the harmony is even more expansive.  Despite nods to the sounds of the ’70s and ’80s what comes through is a record fully rooted in the here and now. Thematically, this is apparent on the title track “Networker” taking a candid snapshot of the “digital you” aspect of life in the age of the internet. The otherwise fun romp “Skeleton Key” also acknowledges the “direct message and obsessive” side of social media with lines like “if you don’t like what you see, the pretty face on the screen, scroll on by…”

Networker was written half between tours and half during recording sessions. The band, Philip Frobos on bass/vocals and Frankie Broyles on guitars/drums/keys, returned with longtime collaborator Nathaniel Higgins to the studio in South Georgia where they also recorded Multi-task and most recent single “Delicacy.” In this case, the “studio” is a cabin near Vienna, GA (pronounced Vye-anna) that was built by Frankie Broyles’ great-grandparents in the 1940s. The band completed four sessions between November 2018 and April 2019.

Omni hit their stride in the cabin with songs such as “Moat,” which cruises along at a nice mid-tempo clip with sounds that are maybe piano or maybe the “behind the bridge” strings of a Jaguar a la Sonic Youth or This Heat.  “Blunt Force” provides a nice contrast to some of the more upbeat cuts, getting jazzy with it’s less traditional arrangement and psychedelic outro.

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Weyes Blood has released alternate takes of tracks from her 2019 critically acclaimed album “Titanic Rising”. Compiled on an EP titled Rough Trade Session, the set is available now via her label Sub Pop Records.

As end-of-year-list compilation season moves into full swing, most of us have probably been revisiting Weyes Blood’s staggering April release Titanic Rising. The baroque, psychedelic, and very much Jonathan Rado produced LP—and Natalie Mering’s first released via Sub Pop Records caught our ears over six months ago, but now you can hear a handful of the album’s singles anew courtesy of Rough Trade.

Streaming on DSPs worldwide today, Weyes Blood’s Rough Trade Session was recorded by Ariel Rechtshaid, and features a straightforward version of the ethereal  “Wild Times,” as well as slight reworkings of “Everyday,” the anthemic “Something to Believe,” and “A Lot Has Changed” (retitled “A Lot’s Gonna Change”). The alternate takes are stripped down and intimate, with Weyes Blood’s vintage, velvety vocals looming over piano chords.

The Rough Trade Session cover art is from the same photoshoot as Titanic Rising, featuring an underwater bedroom Weyes Blood designed herself.The release comes on the verge of yet another set of tour dates, these ones spanning Europe and Australia through 2020.

This week Wolf Parade returned with a brand new single, “Against the Day.” It was shared via a video for the track. It’s the band’s first new song since their 2017 reunion album Cry Cry Cry. The song is out now via Sub Pop Records and you can watch the video below. “Against the Day” features alternating vocals between Dan Boeckner and Spencer Krug and Scorpion Dagger directed the video.

Band Members
Arlen Thompson
Dan Boeckner
Spencer Krug

 

Corridor Loser Edition LP

Corridor are a group from Montreal and their latest Sub Pop Records debut, “Junior”, was made just yesterday. The rock’n’roll band had barely inked their record deal when they surfed into studio, racing against time to make the most dazzling, immediate and inventive album of their young career: 39 minutes of darting and dodging guitars, spiraling vocal harmonies, and the complicated, goldenrod nostalgia of a Sunday mid-afternoon.

This ain’t Corridor’s first rodeo. Junior is the band’s third full-length and their third recorded with their friend, producer (and occasionally roommate) Emmanuel Ethier. However 2015’s Le Voyage Éternel and 2017’s Supermercado were made languorously, their songs taking shape across whole seasons.

This time Dominic Berthiaume (vocals/bass), Julian Perreault (guitar), Jonathan Robert (vocals/guitar/synths), and Julien Bakvis (drums) permitted themselves no such indulgence. The band were committed to releasing an album every two years, and for Junior it required a blitz. “If you want to release something this fall, we need the masters by the 10th of May,” the label had warned them. Winter was already in its last throes: on March 1, Corridor went into studio; in mid-April, Corridor came out. They had somehow created the album  Junior and it was, if we may be so bold, spectacular.

“Topographe” from the Corridor album Junior (Release Date: October 18, 2019)

Omni - Networker

Enter “Networker”, the newest album by Omni and first with indie giant Sub Pop Records. Their sound is still defined by sparse drums, locked-in bass, blistering guitar, and nonchalant, yet assured vocals, but from the first notes of “Sincerely Yours” you’ll immediately notice that Networker sounds much cleaner and more “HI-FI” than their prior two albums, Deluxe (2016) and Multi-task (2017). The departure in fidelity suits the new record and allows the listener to enjoy the nuances of their meticulous arrangements.

Don’t worry, the riffs of Gang of Four and Wire are still present, but the production is more lush and the harmony is even more expansive.  Despite nods to the sounds of the ’70s and ’80s what comes through is a record fully rooted in the here and now. Thematically, this is apparent on the title track “Networker” taking a candid snapshot of the “digital you” aspect of life in the age of the internet. The otherwise fun romp “Skeleton Key” also acknowledges the “direct message and obsessive” side of social media with lines like “if you don’t like what you see, the pretty face on the screen, scroll on by…”

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Julien Baker’s new single “Tokyo” (Release Date: October 11, 2019) is available now on all streaming services and is a part of the latest edition of the iconic Sub Pop Singles Club series. As part of the Sub Pop singles series, she’s dropped “Tokyo” on streaming and its B-side “Sucker Punch”. The songs are also available on vinyl exclusively for subscribers.

“I’m really happy with how they turned out and excited for them to be released as part of the Sub Pop singles series,” she wrote on Instagram. Earlier this year, Baker dropped two singles “Red Door” and “Conversation Piece” on streaming. She also covered Frightened Rabbit’s “The Modern Leper” for a tribute compilation for the band that was released back in June.

Baker’s last full-length solo album was 2017’s Turn Out The LightsLast year, she teamed up with Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacus to form supergroup Boygenius, who released their self-titled EP.