Posts Tagged ‘Sub Pop Records’

RBCF - Sideways to New Italy

After enough time away from home, even the familiar starts to feel foreign. For guitar-pop five-piece Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, returning to Melbourne after long stretches looking out at the world through the windows of airplanes and tour vans lead to dislocation, like being the knot in the middle of a game of tug-o-war. Their second record, Sideways to New Italy (Sub Pop Records), sees the band interrogate their individual pasts and the places that inform them. In clicking the scattered pieces back into place, they have crafted for themselves a new totem of home to carry with them no matter where they end up.

Lead by singer-songwriter-guitarists Tom Russo, Joe White and Fran Keaney (and rounded out by bassist Joe Russo and drummer Marcel Tussie), the band began grasping for something reliable after emerging from relentlessly touring their critically regarded debut Hope Downs. “Sideways to New Italy” on June 5th via the fine folks at Sub Pop. Everything they have released has been awesome.

Home, for Russo, manifests in different ways: there’s Melbourne, where he and brother Joe grew up, but also Southern Italy where the forebears of their family originated. The album is inspired by New Italy – a village near New South Wales’s Northern Rivers – the area Tussie is from. A blink-and-you’ll-miss-it pit-stop of a place with fewer than 200 residents, it was founded by Venetian immigrants in the late-1800s and now serves as something of a living monument to Italians’ contribution to Australia, with replica Roman statues dotted like souvenirs on the otherwise rural landscape. As members of the band individually visited the Mediterranean and returned home to Melbourne’s inner-north, where waves of European migrants forged a sense of home since the 1950s, they realized the emotional distance between the two was minuscule. The prominent and romantic Greco-Roman statues that sit outside tidy brick homes in Brunswick represent, for Russo, an attempt to “build a utopia of where your heart’s from.”

“I wanted to write songs that I could use as some sort of bedrock of hopefulness to stand on, something to be proud of,” says Keaney. “A lot of the songs on the new record are reaching forward and trying to imagine an idyll of home and love.” This is the bulk of Sideways to New Italy, which boasts love songs, and familiar voices and characters, grounding the band’s stories in their personal histories.

The same can be said of this record, where White’s early attempts at writing big, high-concept songs were abandoned in favor of love songs (“She’s There,” “The Only One”), and familiar voices and characters filter in and out, grounding the band’s stories in their personal histories. On “Second of the First” the voice of a close friend joins White’s partner in delivering a spoken word passage; the chorus from “Cool Change” began its life in a song the trio played in an early band, over a decade ago; the chords from “Cameo” were once in an eventually abandoned song called “Hope Downs”; an early version of “Falling Thunder” featured a reference that only their friends would recognize.

“Sideways to New Italy” on June 5th via the fine folks at Sub Pop Records. Everything they have released has been awesome to date.

What happens when an abrasive rock trio trades guitars for synths, cranks up the beats and leans into the everyday anxieties of simply being a functioning human in the 21st century? The answer is Uneasy Laughter, the sensational second Sub Pop Records release from Los Angeles-based Moaning.

Vocalist/guitarist Sean Solomon, bassist/keyboardist Pascal Stevenson and drummer Andrew MacKelvie have been friends and co-conspirators amid the fertile L.A. DIY scene for more than a decade. They are also immersed in other creative pursuits — Solomon is a noted illustrator, art director and animator, while Stevenson and MacKelvie have played or worked behind the boards with acts such as Cherry Glazerr, Sasami and Surf Curse. On Uneasy Laughter, they’ve tackled challenges both personal and universal the only way they know how: by talking about how they’re feeling and channeling those emotions directly into their music.

Release Date March 20th, 2020

Kikagakumoyo gypseydavey cover 2175

Kikagaku Moyo started in the summer of 2012 busking on the streets of Tokyo. Though the band started as a free music collective, it quickly evolved into a tight group of multi-instrumentalists. Kikagaku Moyo call their sound psychedelic because it encompasses a broad spectrum of influence. Their music incorporates elements of classical Indian music, Krautrock, Traditional Folk, and 70s Rock. Most importantly their music is about freedom of the mind and body and building a bridge between the supernatural and the present. Improvisation is a key element to their sound.

Go & Tomo run their own record label Guruguru Brain currently based in Amsterdam. Guruguru Brain has released about 10 artists from Asia including Kikagaku Moyo since 2014.

Kikagaku Moyo’s new single “Gypsy Davey” b/w “Mushi Nu Uta”  is available now on all streaming services and is a part of the latest edition of the iconic Sub Pop Singles Club series.

Sub Pop Records Released on: 24th February,

Image may contain: 1 person, sunglasses and hat, possible text that says 'KING TUFF THE OTHER OUT NOW'

Here we have a brand new track from the one and only King Tuff! He also has a little something to say about it:

“I’m Free” is a song I wrote a few years back which first appeared on Ty Segall’s album Freedom’s Goblin. Ty had asked me to write a song for him to record and I had this little demo laying around which I gave to him. I never really thought about it much after that but recently I was asked if I would ever release my own version of the song… so here it is! My favorite time to write songs has always been in the middle of the night. The world slows down and the little nocturnal critters start hooting, howling, buzzing, bubbling… there’s just different ideas that float around that you can’t catch during the day. This is a small song about that. The crickets and raindrops you hear towards the end of the song were recorded one night in June in Vermont outside of a witches hut.”

“I’m Free” – Release Day: February 20th, 2020

“I Shall Be Free” is the second single in the series of four 7”vinyls leading up to their next full-length LP. Each single being a seasonal release. “I Shall Be Free” is the Spring installment. The song is defiant anti-work protest punk. The slash your face chords and bass less undertow channels an AC/DC-Cramps hybrid that completely misses the mark. Primo Hot Snakes for sure.
released February 11th, 2020
Released  Sub Pop Records

Wolf Parade Thin Mind review

Wolf Parade the Montreal band’s 2005 debut, Apologies to the Queen Mary, became a ubiquitous indie radio staple. The band Wolf Parade – Dan Boeckner, Spencer Krug and Arlen Thompson – release ‘Thin Mind’, the group’s fifth album for Sub Pop. their heart, panache, and synthesizers on display through their next few albums, 2008’s excellent At Mount Zoomer and 2010’s Expo 86, and after a lengthy hiatus, they showed more growth on 2017′s Cry Cry Cry.

Their new album “Thin Mind” still comes as an unexpected new peak for the band this album scratches a very specific and satisfying itch for indie guitar music in 2020. Now a trio, the group has only deepened its talents and personal musical aesthetic, while their lyrical themes have taken on both a newfound maturity and optimism.

Wolf Parade seem more comfortable commenting on the world around them on Thin Mind, but they sound just as interested in having a good time making music. The songs bounce and zip with the sort of kinetic energy that’s hard to find in blogosphere success stories still making music in 2020. As can be heard on standout tracks such as “Julia Take Your Man Home” and “Forest Green,” everything sounds sharper and more direct, without being aggressive or in-your-face, as any art-pop sprawl has been replaced with glammy arena rock tendencies. The panoply of synthesizers on display across the entire project, especially on “Wandering Son” and “Against the Day,” are also a fine addition. This full turn away from being Wire disciples to New Order and Duran Duran acolytes provides a resplendent edge.  for Wolf Parade to kick off 2020 with a ten-song album bursting with mature perspectives and emotional heft, it makes even jaded assholes like me sit up and take notice.

Thin Mind is packed with straight-up fun music that overflows with a danceable sensibility, infectious melodies, and overall good vibes. The songs here find Wolf Parade openly encouraging their listeners to make a difference in the world, to work to make things better. As they put it, during the chorus of album highlight “The Static Age,” “I don’t want to live in the static age staying in a place where nothing changes. We can begin again.”

Band Members
Arlen Thompson,
Dan Boeckner,
Spencer Krug,

Frankie Cosmos is the musical pseudonym for Greta Kline, the daughter of Kevin Kline and Phoebe Cates. Since 2012, Kline has been releasing an impressive catalogue of lo-fi, often endearing indie-rock songs. “Close it Quietly” is her second full-length to be released by celebrated label Sub Pop and it marks a huge step forward. Indeed, these 21 songs in just under 40 minutes make up her most substantial offering to date, without losing the original homespun appeal of her early records. Her quirky, conversational style is fully on display on “Cosmic Shop,” the sunny “Windows,” the tender and intimate “Marbles” and the key-standout closer, “This Swirling.” Kline possesses a quiet, unique cleverness that is worth finding.

Close it Quietly (Release day: September 6th, 2019)

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We don’t get enough indie rock prom ballads. There’s nothing revolutionary about Shannon Lay’s heart-rending new single “Blue.” It’s a slow, gorgeous love song. “I will love you till my hair turns blue,” Lay sings — calm, matter-of-fact, reassuring. Behind her, the guitars have just the right level of reverb and sustain. The contemplatively bluesy electric piano solo arrives at just the right moment. The key change kicks you in the heart, just the way you might hope it would. It’s a beautiful song that never tries to be anything other than a beautiful song. It’s six minutes long, and if it was longer, nobody would complain. You could slow dance to this song.

Shannon Lay’s new single “Blue” b/w “We Mend” (Released  December 12th, 2019) is available now on all streaming services and is a part of the latest edition of the iconic Sub Pop Singles Club series.

In May The Gotobeds – Cary, TFP, Eli and Gavin – return to the fray with their third full lengther, After 10 plus years in the underground, Sub Pop’s least-famous band made their best record yet with “Debt Begins At 30”, a fitting title for a record that isn’t afraid to sound its age or remind you of yours. Featuring contributions from a laundry list of fellow punk lifers, Debt Begins At 30 is a rollicking post-punk mixtape of sorts that still bears all the hallmarks of a Gotobeds record: thrashy guitars, loudmouthed politics, more guitars, and heaps of bitingly acerbic humor—this time, with even stronger songwriting and some studio polish that does nothing to dial down their inherent commitment to being the loudest band in the basement. And you’ve gotta give it up for a band with enough confidence to not only put the title track on the record twice, but let Victoria Ruiz of Downtown Boys, who takes vocal duties on the second go-round, rewrite the lyrics in Spanish when none of the band’s members actually speak the language.

Give me a minute or three to extol the virtues of The Gotobeds, the modern rock and roll sensation that has always sounded like they love to play. Never maligned by having the world’s weight on their backs,

Wolf Parade will release “Thin Mind”, the group’s fifth full-length, on January 24th worldwide through Sub Pop Records, with the exception of Canada through Royal Mountain Records. The ten-track album, which features the singles “Forest Green,” the previously released  “Against the Day,”  and “Julia Take Your Man Home,” was produced by John Goodmanson at Risque Disque on Vancouver Island, BC.

Every moment spent gazing at our screens is oversaturated with content, an ever-accelerated news cycle conditioning our ever-decreasing attention spans. The struggle to stay present, and to foresee a clear, sustainable future, feels very real. Wolf Parade address this phenomenon head-on with Thin Mind, the band’s 5th full-length and second to be produced by John Goodmanson (Bikini Kill, Sleater-Kinney, Unwound).

“Thin Mind” refers to the way that being around too much tech has made our focus thin,” says keyboardist Spencer Krug. “It’s opening one more page, scrolling one more thing,” adds guitarist Dan Boeckner, “and the weird, sort-of hollow automaton feeling that you get from it.”

“This record is very personal, but at the same time, we’re all coming from the same place of a general sense of anxiety,” says drummer Arlen Thompson. “How do you deal with the constant barrage of having your opinions swayed by all these different actors when you don’t know who they are or what their purpose is? There is no normal anymore.”

Thin Mind marks a return to the original power trio of Dan, Spencer, and Arlen, following multi-instrumentalist Dante DeCaro’s amicable departure from the group in 2018, after the conclusion of their world tour supporting Cry Cry Cry.

One month later, the trio got together at Risqué Disque, an old stone barn-turned-studio in the woods of Vancouver Island, to begin writing Thin Mind—emerging with an album about making sense of the present while reckoning with visions of the future

From the album Thin Mind (Release Date: January 24th, 2020