Posts Tagged ‘Songhoy Blues’

Songhoy Blues is a band whose experiences in Mali have opened their eyes to universal problems plaguing people everywhere. Using the pain and lessons learned from having to leave their hometowns in northern Mali, the band realizes that human rights is a concept that extends far beyond what they have seen with their own eyes and far beyond just the borders of Mali. In order for the band to see their homes restored, they understand the fight must be fought on all fronts, for everybody across the spectrum. They are no longer refugees or exiles or four people with instruments—they are Songhoy Blues, a musical voice for empowerment and equality.

Working with Matt Sweeney, who encouraged the band to make the album they want to make, “Optimisme” confronts our world today. On “Badala” and “Gabi,” Songhoy Blues seeks the empowerment of women, asking for centuries-old misogynistic practices to be done away with. With “Worry,” the band advises both the young and the old that positive vibes and persistence are the best tools to fight our struggles. In “Asssda,” the band praises and thanks the everyday warriors who wake up everyday to sweat for the betterment of their communities and in “Dournia,” the band laments the lack of compassion and empathy between humans today in the face of increasing materialism and selfishness. “Bon Bon” warns of being fooled by shiny promises, and in “Barre” the band asks for the youth to get involved at home for change while warning off those who wish to divide in “Fey Fey.” Each time Songhoy Blues steps to the mic on Optimisme the band confronts, consoles, praises, thanks, and encourages the listener toward a better world tomorrow. 

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released October 23rd, 2020

Songhoy Blues is a band whose experiences in Mali have opened their eyes to universal problems plaguing people everywhere. Using the pain and lessons learned from having to leave their hometowns in northern Mali, the band realizes that human rights is a concept that extends far beyond what they have seen with their own eyes and far beyond just the borders of Mali. In order for the band to see their homes restored, they understand the fight must be fought on all fronts, for everybody across the spectrum. They are no longer refugees or exiles or four people with instruments—they are Songhoy Blues, a musical voice for empowerment and equality.
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Working with Matt Sweeney, who encouraged the band to make the album they want to make, “Optimisme” confronts our world today. On “Badala” and “Gabi,” Songhoy Blues seeks the empowerment of women, asking for centuries-old misogynistic practices to be done away with. With “Worry,” the band advises both the young and the old that positive vibes and persistence are the best tools to fight our struggles. In “Assada,” the band praises and thanks the everyday warriors who wake up everyday to sweat for the betterment of their communities and in “Dournia,” the band laments the lack of compassion and empathy between humans today in the face of increasing materialism and selfishness. “Bon Bon” warns of being fooled by shiny promises, and in “Barre” the band asks for the youth to get involved at home for change while warning off those who wish to divide in “Fey Fey.” Each time Songhoy Blues steps to the mic on Optimisme
 the band confronts, consoles, praises, thanks, and encourages the listener toward a better world tomorrow.

Releases October 23rd, 2020

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“The harshness of life still weighs on our societies and sinks many young people into a dead end,” says the band in a unified statement. “’Worry’ is a positive energy that Songhoy Blues want to be a ray of hope for humanity. ‘Worry’ is about not stopping fighting because at the very end you will find the light.”

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Released June 17th, 2020 Produced by Matt Sweeney

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Ace Malian four-piece Songhoy Blues are readying their debut album ‘Music In Exile’. It’ll be out on Transgressive Records and comes preceded by the first single, ‘Al Hassidi Tere’. The album is co-produced by Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Nick Zinner and Marc-Antoine Moreau. The latter discovered the band in 2013 when scouting on behalf of Africa Express – Songhoy Blues later contributed a track to the Africa Express album, ‘Maison des Jeunes’.

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Ace Malian four-piece Songhoy Blues are readying their debut album ‘Music In Exile’. It’ll be out on Transgressive Records and comes preceded by the first single, ‘Al Hassidi Tere’. The album is co-produced by Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Nick Zinner and Marc-Antoine Moreau. The latter discovered the band in 2013 when scouting on behalf of Africa Express – Songhoy Blues later contributed a track to the Africa Express album, ‘Maison des Jeunes’.