Posts Tagged ‘Lets Eat Grandma’

Let’s Eat Grandma

I’m All Ears, the stunning new album by 19-year-old experimental duo Let’s Eat Grandma, is full of loud moments; but one of its most impactful is actually its quietest. “Ava” is a slight three-minute ballad that takes the penultimate place on the tracklist. While elsewhere, Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton work with producers SOPHIE and The Horrors’ Faris Badwan to creating ground-shaking setpieces like “Hot Pink”, and while synths dazzle like disco lights on the euphoric dream “Falling Into Me”, “Ava” is a simple piano affair. It speaks softly, and plainly, on an experience that has rarely been articulated so well in song; the feeling of watching on the sidelines as a loved one battles mental health issues.

The Ava of the song’s title is depicted as a scarred, withdrawn, afraid individual, one who cries out, What do you want from me?” The voice that answers her, in a call-and-response narrated in Rosa Walton’s gliding, robust vocal, is a gentle one, but one brimming with frustration and pain. “Why’d you take it as final, when you’re starting to spiral? / Girl, why can’t you see?”

The lyrics give voice to an ache that is so hard to articulate because it is, by nature, a secondary pain. It’s the feeling of being trapped on the sidelines of a catastrophe. “You know I know you can do it”, Walton urges, with a note of desperation. The inherent tragedy of loving someone with mental health issues is the powerlessness of it; you can tell someone you think the world of them, that they are special, that they are loved, but you can’t force them to believe it.

In a press release on the song’s release last month, Hollingworth elaborated on the story the duo are telling. She said “Ava” is about “the realisation as you get older that some things are more complicated, and from the outside looking at a person you can’t always see how difficult some problems are to solve.”

“‘Ava’ is a song about the reality of being someone who is there – someone who not only checks in, but promises an unwavering support – but somehow still can’t be enough”

Perhaps one of the reasons this song cuts so deep in this particular moment is the way in which the frantic public conversation around mental health, and particularly depression, has exploded in recent weeks. Following the tragic suicides of designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain in June, there was a wave of well-meaning, earnest discussion online about what can be done about an invisible epidemic. Per the New Yorker, suicide in the US has risen by 25% in the past two decades.

When news related to mental illness breaks, the trend is for many people to tweet and otherwise signal that those of us who are depressed should reach out for help, and the rest of us should “check in” on our loved ones. People reach for the right, reassuring words to say in a crisis – it’s only human. But it can also, sometimes, blur the issue. It’s comforting, but a sweeping oversimplification, to imagine that people suffer mental illness only because they don’t have people who “check in” on them; to assume they don’t have people who are actually desperate to help them. As one writer tweeted in June, “suicide is not simple, it can’t be solved by a lunch date.”

“Ava” is a song about the reality of being someone who is there – someone who not only checks in, but promises an unwavering support – but somehow still can’t be enough. It expresses a feeling of an overwhelming need to fix something that you can’t fix, to be let in when you’ve been shut out. This is a reality for a lot of people, but one that’s rarely been spoken to so cuttingly and directly in a pop song.

The lyrics of “Ava” show the kind of intense, loving bargaining that you go through when trying to help someone out of their own personal darkness. But Walton’s delivery also contains complexity. She’ll help Ava, she promises on the refrain, whether“this” happens “once, or twice, or… again…”. That ellipsis is felt. Her voice becomes much softer as she breathes through the word“again”, heavy with the weight of realisation that there is a mountain before her. Steeling herself, she takes an emotional run-up to her next repetition of the word: “againnnnn”, she intones over rising chords, her gentle voice made hard with determination.

I’m All Ears is out now;

Lets Eat Grandma

Let’s Eat Grandma release their second and stunning album, I’m All Ears, via Transgressive Records. I’m All Ears is an even greater revelation than Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingworth’s globally acclaimed debut, I, Gemini. The second act from the British teenage vocalists, multi-instrumentalists and songwriters, is the most startling, infectious, innovative and thrilling record you’ll hear this year. It is alive with furious pop, unapologetic grandeur, intimate ballads; with loops, Logic, outrageous 80s drum solos, as well as production from David Wrench (The xx / Frank Ocean / Caribou), SOPHIE (famed for her own material and work with Madonna, Charli XCX and Vince Staples) and Faris Badwan (The Horrors). It’s an album that cements Let’s Eat Grandma as one of the most creative and exciting bands in the world right now.

The finale of Let’s Eat Grandma’s intoxicating, expansive second album I’m All Ears is the intricate 11-minute drama “Donnie Darko”—named, of course, for the 2001 film that has become a byword for suburban teenage angst. Director Richard Kelly served that familiar emotion with a hefty side of disturbing magical realism; nothing is quite as it seems, but emotions run high.

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“We watched Donnie Darko while we were still writing our first album, years ago,” explains Jenny Hollingworth, one half of the U.K. duo, alongside Rosa Walton. “We weren’t writing about the film—there’s nothing about giant rabbits—but it was an inspiration, especially the part when [Donnie’s] run over. Some of the themes match some of ours: [being] a teenager, navigating the world, and things being ambiguous. Even in terms of the sounds on the album, it just made sense.”

Hollingworth and Walton have been best friends since kindergarten, and bandmates from the age of 13. They put out their first album when Walton was just 16 and Hollingworth 17—astonishing, given their debut’s musical and lyrical range.

Let’s Eat Grandma – It’s Not Just Me (Official Video) The song will be on our second album ‘I’m All Ears’ which is coming out 29th June 2018,

Let’s Eat Grandma – Hot Pink (Official Music Video) The song will be on our second album ‘I’m All Ears’ which is coming out 29 June 2018,

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Some amazing reissues this week and an awful lot. We have Guns ‘n’ Roses, Wire, Aphex Twin, Guru and that LOST Coltrane album, I would happily have any of them as my record of the week.

The reissues of the first three Wire albums on vinyl are upon us, and not before time. Wire emerged from the ghetto that is St. Albans in October 1976, inspired by the punk explosion. Harvest Records, a label which had up to that point had a roster comprised almost completely of acts punks would have spat on decided it needed to get in on the act and signed them, not realising they were not, despite an exquisite talent for melody and inventiveness, going to furnish them with hits, and so they parted company in 1979. As it happens, “Pink Flag”, “Chairs Missing” and “154”, spanning playful art punk, new wave and post punk in a seamless line between 1977 and 1979 are about as good as any of those genres get. The three are all indispensable artifacts of the era.

Let’s Eat Grandma follow up the much vaunted “I, Gemini” with the equally beguiling “I’m All Ears”, while the Gorillaz enthusiastic genre bending mission continues unabashed with the excellent “The Now Now”.

Record Of The Week goes to Numero Groups stunning compilation of the first 4 albums by Happy Rhodes. Pure dream pop, I instantly fell in love with this. Its like a more stripped back Kate Bush, which brings in some lovely synth as it progresses.
Its the kind of album that I wish I had received a promo for as I have massively under ordered! You can stream on Numero’s bandcamp page,

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Let’s Eat Grandma  –  “

Let’s Eat Grandma return with their newest edition, ‘I’m All Ears’ which an even greater revelation than Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingworth’s globally acclaimed debut, I, Gemini. The second act from the British teenage vocalists, multi-instrumentalists and songwriters, is the most startling, infectious, innovative and thrilling record you’ll hear this year. It is alive with furious pop, unapologetic grandeur, intimate ballads; with loops, Logic, outrageous 80s drum solos, as well as production from David Wrench (The XX/Frank Ocean/Caribou), Sophie (famed for her own material and work with Madonna, Charli XCX and Vince Staples) and Faris Badwan (The Horrors). Their sound has developed a stronger electronic tone while remaining their upbeat young vocals throughout. It’s an album that cements Let’s Eat Grandma as one of the most creative and exciting bands in the world right now.

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Florence + the Machine  – High As Hope

Florence + the Machine announces new album, ‘High As Hope’. For perhaps the first time, ‘High As Hope’ is a record that is as intimate as it is epic, with the more restrained sound relatively speaking; Florence knows herself well enough now to declare “I’m never going to be minimal” -mirroring this sense that happiness doesn’t always have to be big and dramatic:There’s a lot of love in this record, loneliness too, but a lot of love.”

An album that mixes high and low–from a tribute to Patti Smith one minute to being ghosted over text by a date the next –‘High As Hope’ is made up, says Florence, “of joy and fury”…

“Towering performer twirls back with power and poetry” – Evening Standard,
“A euphoric return by a singular talent” – Telegraph,
“an appealingly visceral force” – Guardian.

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Happy Rhodes – Ectotrophia

The first authoritative compilation of American dream pop artist Happy Rhodes, whose singular songwriting and four-octave vocal range emanated from the pastoral confines of upstate New York in the 1980s. Her melding of classical music influences with synthesizer and acoustic guitar, and her enchanting and idiosyncratic singing, are favorably compared to heralded English chanteuse Kate Bush. Fans of such artistic pop music would be remiss to overlook Rhodes’s similarly remarkable and otherworldly sonic transmissions, traversing tales of dreamers, outsiders, lovers and other lovely and terrifying creatures born of a wellspring of wild creativity and bold imagination. Affectionately remastered from the original tapes, Ectotrophia gathers essential songs from Rhodes’s mid-’80s salad days, many written when she was just a teenager – wildly ahead of her time and unafraid to bare her soul to regional audiences, the ectophiles who’d eventually coin an entire subgenre of pop music in her honor. Dive deep into ecto, with the woman who started it all.

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Dawes – Passwords

On the group’s sixth album, Passwords, inspiration pulls guitarist / singer Taylor Goldsmith, drummer Griffin Goldsmith, bassist Wylie Gelber, and keyboardist Lee Pardini into their most universal, topical territory to date. This is a record about the modern world: the relationships that fill it, the politics that divide it, the small victories and big losses that give it shape. Taylor’s writing is personal at points – the result of his recent engagement, which lends a sense of gravity and self-reflection to album highlights like Time Flies Either Way and I Can’t Love – but it also zooms out, focusing not on the director himself, but on everything within the lens.

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The Alarm  –  Equals

Equalsis The Alarm’s first album since 2010’s Direct Action. It is a barnstorming collection of 11 songs that act as a retrenchment of old values and a poignant reflection of the tough times Mike Peters and his wife Jules have been through in recent years. Produced by George Williams (who previously worked on 2005’s Under Attack), Equals opens with a torrent of epic rock numbers such as Two Riversand Beautiful, which see Peters singing about coming to terms with the past before moving to enjoy life to the full. With Mike and Jules joined by Joe Strummer and The Mescaleros drummer Smiley and guitarist James Stevenson, who cut his teeth with Chelsea, Gen X and The Cult, the album encompasses twin harmony guitars, pounding drums and electronic layering, while guest guitarist Billy Duffy (The Cult) helps Peters and Stevenson blend acoustic and electric sounds on Coming Backwards.

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Ryan Adams –  Baby I love You

A ONE TIME pressing on PINK COLOURED vinyl with backed on the B-Side by “Was I Wrong”.
No, it isn’t a cover of the Ronettes classic of the same name, but it’s “A song to one’s baby, whom they love – a unique twist on Ryan Adams’ classic recipe, with key ingredient ‘sad’ replaced by ‘happy,’” according to the press release.

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Graham Nash – Over the Years

Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Graham Nash burst on to the scene during the British Invasion with The Hollies before he formed the legendary supergroup Crosby, Stills and Nash in 1968 with David Crosby and Stephen Stills. As Nash prepares to launch a European tour in July, he looks back at some of his best-known recordings from the past 50 years in a new anthology featuring more than a dozen unreleased demos and mixes. Over The Years… features 30 tracks has been painstakingly curated by Nash and longtime associate Joel Bernstein and includes extensive credits and liner notes. The anthology highlights songs from the iconic CSN debut album (Marrakesh Express) and its successor album Déjà Vu, for which Neil Young joined forces with CSN (Our House and Teach Your Children) as well as songs from subsequent CSN albums (Just A Song Before I GoandWasted On The Way). In addition, the collection highlights songs that Nash recorded for his 1971 solo debut, Songs For Beginners, including Military Madness and Simple Man, and includes unreleased mixes for two other songs from that album: Better Daysand I Used To Be King. The most recent recording on the compilation is Myself At Last from Nash’s 2016 solo album This Path Tonight. Two tracks from his enduring albums with David Crosby (Immigration Man and Wind On The Water) are also included in the collection.

2CD – The CD version includes 15 demo recordings, 12 of which have never been released. Standouts include the 1968 London demo of Marrakesh Express, rejected by the Hollies and setting the stage for Nash’s relocation to Los Angeles and the next chapter of his life. The set contains early versions of CSN classics like Our House, Wasted On The Way, Pre-Road Downs, andTeach Your Children. Other unreleased gems include: I Miss You and You’ll Never Be The Same — both from Nash’s 1974 solo album Wild Tales — and Horses Through A Rainstorm, originally intended for Déjà Vu.

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Buffalo Springfield  – What’s That Sound? Complete Albums Collection

Before playing its final show on May 5th, 1968, Buffalo Springfield released three studio albums on ATCO during an intense, two-year creative burst. Those albums – Buffalo Springfield, Buffalo Springfield Again, and Last Time Around – have been newly remastered from the original analog tapes under the auspices of Neil Young for the new boxed set: What’s That Sound? The Complete Albums Collection. Stephen Stills, Neil Young, Richie Furay, Bruce Palmer and Dewey Martin played their first show together as Buffalo Springfield in 1966. The same year, the band recorded and released its self-titled debut, which included the iconic protest song, For What It’s Worth, featuring lyrics as poignant now as they were then, in addition to standouts like Burned, Do I Have To Come Right Out And Say It, and the band’s first single, Nowadays Clancy Can’t Even Sing. The group spent the first half of 1967 making Buffalo Springfield Again, which was the first album to feature songs written by Furay (A Child’s Claim To Fame.) Stills and Young both contributed some all-time classics with Bluebird and Rock And Roll Woman from Stills, and Mr. Soul and Expecting To Fly from Young. When Last Time Around came out in July 1968, the band members were in the midst of transitioning to new projects: Stills famously joined David Crosby and Graham Nash in CSN; Young went solo; and Furay started Poco with Jim Messina, who produced Last Time Around and played bass on two of the songs. Highlights abound on the album with Young’s I Am A Child, Furay’s Kind Woman and Stills’ Uno Mundo.

5CD – Five CD Box Set, Clamshell with Five Wallets. The 5-CD set includes Buffalo Springfield and Buffalo Springfield Again in mono and stereo, as well as the stereo version of Last Time Around.

5LP – Five LP Box Set. The 5-LP set includes Buffalo Springfield and Buffalo Springfield Again in mono and stereo, as well as the stereo version of Last Time Around.

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Wire  –  Chairs Missing

Wire’s first three albums need no introduction. They are the three classic albums on which Wire’s reputation is based. Moreover, they are the recordings that minted the post-punk form. This was adopted by other bands, but Wire were there first. These are the definitive re-releases. Each album is presented as an 80-page hardback book – the size of a 7-inch, but obviously much thicker. After a special introduction by Jon Savage, Graham Duff provides insight into each track. These texts include recording details, brand-new interviews with band members, and lyrics.

This stunning set of presentations also includes a range of images from the archive of Annette Green. Wire’s official photographer during this period, Green also shot the covers for Pink Flag and Chairs Missing. Promotional and informal imagery – in colour and black and white – is featured throughout the books. Most of the photographs have not been seen for 40 years – and many have never been published anywhere before.

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With “Pink Flag” Wire tapped happily into punk’s energy and iconoclastic tendencies, “Chairs Missing” is, perhaps, a little truer to their own instincts. They didnt completely shed the past completely; the joyful “Sand In My Joints” and grinding “Mercy” have more than a hint of “Pink Flag” about them, but their 1978 offering is moodier and much more textured than its predecessor, the addition of swathes of electronic sounds moving them firmly into post punk territory, a genre they helped to spawn. There is pure pop beauty on here too, of which “Outdoor Miner”  and “French Film Blurred” being the most gorgeous examples.

Pink Flag was very much Wire’s punk rock album, and while they fully embraced it’s revolutionary spirit, they came at it from their own obtuse angle. unhindered by talent (any kind of prior musical schooling) they gleefully took a baseball bat to Rock’s overblown torso with humour and irreverence, producing classic, unsurpassed razor pop brilliance and a joyful antidote to the pomposity of their forerunners.

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“154”, released in 1979, is perhaps the most overlooked of the first trio of classic Wire L.P.s, before a ten year haitus interrupted only by esoteric solo releases. It develops further on the electronic and experimental direction of “Chairs Missing”, and while guitars are not entirely done away with, keyboards and often unsettling vocal harmonies are the dominant mode of expression here. That’s not to say they abandoned their talent for an exquisite harmony, it is very much still there; just bent a bit. That said it is given undiluted free rein during “Map Ref…”, and elevates the sublime “The 15th” into the realm of the gods.

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Golden Smog – Down By The Old Mainstream

Golden Smog, the alternative-country super group from Minneapolis, released this debut album on Rykodisc in 1995 and this is the first time it will be repressed on vinyl since the original release in 2010. The loosely connected, interchangeable group has comprised members from the Jayhawks, Wilco, Soul Asylum, Run Westy Run and Big Star. This new deluxe ROG package will come in a gatefold, old school tip-on Stoughton jacket with printed inner sleeves.

‘Down by the old mainstream’, was recorded in 1994 in only five days. it was made up mostly of original songs written specifically for the project. the songs on the album revealed a fun, spirited sensibility …allowing the band members to let loose from their day jobs. Golden Smog first appeared in 1992 with the release of their ep, On Golden Smog. a side project for members of whose true identities of the band members were veiled by the use of pseudonyms david spear, michael macklyn, raymond virginia, scott summitt, jarret decatur-lane and leonardson saratoga. each name was a deliberate clue that included an actual middle name and part of the address of each band member.

All This Weeks important Releases….

John Coltrane – Both Directions At Once – The Lost Album – Impulse
Guru – Jazzmatazz – UMC (3LP Box set)
Happy Rhodes – Ectorophia – Numero Group
Arp – Zebra – Mexican Summer
Guns ‘N’ Roses – Appetite For Destruction – UMC (2LP)
Aphex Twin – Selected Ambient Works 85-92 – Apollo
Wire – Pink Flag – Pink Flag
Wire – Chairs Missing – Pink Flag
Wire – 154 – Pink Flag
Florence & The Machine – High Hopes – Virgin (Indie Exclusive)
Lena Platonos – Lepidoptera – Dark Entries
The Orb – No Sounds Are Out Of Bounds – Cooking Vinyl (Indie Exclusive)
Eddie Harris – Plug Me In – Get On Down
Various Artists – Disques Debs International – Strut
Ryan Adams – Baby I Love You 7″ – Paxam (Indie Exclusive)

The joy of discovering that a love crush feels the same way about you is so pure, so unimpeachable, so fragile that it threatens to swallow itself whole almost immediately. From the upcoming album I’m All Ears, Let’s Eat Grandma crystallizes the high of newfound infatuation into a three-minute pop gem.

“It’s Not Just Me” begins right when the realization finally kicks in. “And just when we discover that we need each other here,” sighs Rosa Walton, “our lives keep pulling us away.” SOPHIE’s production conjures a fun house of shattered mirrors, as per usual, but here with The Horrors’ Faris Badwan, carves chaotic synths into a sleek glass house that’s already beginning to fissure at the base. The feeling is tenuous and uncertain, but Walton and Jenny Hollingworth revel in it for as long as they can.

“It’s not just me, I know you’re feeling the same way,” the two recite in unison on the chorus. There’s equal parts disbelief and pleasure in their repetition of the line. Let’s Eat Grandma gallivant through seaside vistas and abandoned buildings in the video directed by Balan Evans, driving through the uncharted territory of young romance together. Crushes come and go, but, as with everything attached to the Let’s Eat Grandma project, Rosa and Jenny will stick together.

I’m All Ears releases June 29th on Transgressive Records

Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingworth were just 17 when Let’s Eat Grandma released their debut I, Gemini. Childhood friends who grew up writing songs that, over time, emerged into something quite magical. Call it experimental sludge pop, bubblegum-psych rock, it was a marriage of magnificence and makeshift, with synths, saxophones, clapping games, recorders, and secured them sold out shows, critical acclaim, a spellbinding turn on Jools Holland; their audience drawn to the strange beauty of their music, to something compelling and otherworldly.

Two years on, and I’m All Ears is an even greater revelation: the most startling, infectious, innovative and thrilling record you’ll hear this year — alive with furious pop, unapologetic grandeur, intimate ballads; with loops, Logic, outrageous 80s drum solos, as well as production from David Wrench (The xx/Frank Ocean/Caribou) and SOPHIE (famed for her own material, as well as work with Madonna, Charli XCX, and Vince Staples) with Faris Badwan (HMLTD, The Horrors); an album that cements Let’s Eat Grandma as one of the most creative and exciting bands in the world right now.

I’m All Ears is not only the sound of a band diverging and finding their own identities, it is also the sound of two young musicians united afresh, bringing with them their individual loves, passions, experiences. It is a record, too, that is musically exceptional, lyrically remarkable, charged with wit and joy and tenderness. It is the kind of record after which everything changes.

Let’s Eat Grandma – Falling Into Me

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The song will be on our second album ‘I’m All Ears’ which is coming out 29th June 2018,

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#U.K. pop duo Let’s Eat Grandma released their debut album I, Gemini in 2016, when members Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton were just 17 years old. Today, they return with “Hot Pink” their first new song since. On their latest, the pair collaborated with an artist whose pop sensibility is as singular as theirs: producer, solo artist, and PC Music affiliate Sophie. “Hot Pink” retains Hollingworth and Walton’s yearning harmonies and quirky lyrics, while Sophie makes her presence known with airy synthesizers and a thundering, spluttering chorus.

According to Let’s Eat Grandma, “‘Hot Pink’ is about the misconceptions of femininity and masculinity and the power of embracing both of them. It’s about self-expression and appreciation for an underrated colour.”

The Deer Shed Festival is a truly fantastic, family-friendly festival that somehow manages to retain a quality of music and band choices, Its true to its roots, where other festivals sometimes feel like a compromise. It fills a great gap between a serious festival for music lovers like myself who like to see the newer bands on the gigging circuit and also find that hidden newcomer, plus where else can the kids have fun rather than having to send them to the usual token and half-hearted kids field/tent like you get at other festivals. Where else do you have a whole football sized area for swingball or make cardboard boxes into something from your imagination.  From the whole heap of things to make in the science marquees to running around the perimeter of the park for you morning run.

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My Pick of Bands to check out over the weekend

Friday

It could be a difficult evening ahead, as there is such a huge array of talented bands on all stages Teenage Fan Club are such an iconic indie band surely not to be missed having released their 10th album this year, but we have some returning bands both with terrific album releases this year to the festival Honeyblood are a duo I’ve seen many times now, they played the festival two years ago, Stina Tweeddale’s is a great guitar player with her distorted ringing guitar and vocal performance to match, the band present rage-filled, but beautifully written, songs along with Cat Myers’s powerful drum beats constantly driving them forward. Stina is a great front person and for just a duo their sound is huge.

Happyness are a 3-piece alternative rock band from London, All 3 members write the songs, they also have played Deer Shed previously and have a real charm, their latest album is just another stunning collection full of wonderful power pop tunes  which finally followed up their great debut album “Weird Little Birthday” that included one of the best songs about Arcade Fire ever “Montreal Rock Band Somewhere” . LP2 is called “Write In”, and it finds the UK indie rockers continuing to explore the lackadaisical, sardonic indie rock pastures .

In The Dock Stage, Manchester band Cabbage a five piece serving up an idiosyncratic, satirical attacks in the form of discordant neo post-punk.Cabbage have been the festival band of the year drawing huge crowds to the stage as the year progressed .

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Lets Eat Grandma Rosa Walton and Jenny Hollingworth are another big addition with a very visual stage presence.

Jesca Hoop has a  captivating voice her set with Sam Beam at the End Of The Road last year was possibly one of the best musical and magical moments of the last year, Hoop has released another stunningly good album earlier this year “Memories Are Now” the resulting combination is powerfully evocative, with overarching themes of biology, nature and humanity.

Over on the Obelisk stage Hopefully avoiding line-up clashes the headliners here are a folk duo not to be missed are the beautiful Folk-Rock vocals of Josienne Clarke and the guitar talents of her bearded band mate Ben Walker. Together, Clarke and Walker , both 34, are one of Britain’s biggest folk acts, with five albums of beautifully textured, twilight songs, plus many years of treading the dusty boards of folk sessions and festivals, and a coveted Radio 2 folk award for best duo between them. Original songs have been part of Clarke and Walker’s arsenal since day one, and their latest album, “Overnight”, includes seven of them: beautifully drawn miniatures full of a melancholy reminiscent of early-70s singer-songwriters. Clarke writes the songs, “the squishy, lyrical stuff”, while Walker’s the arranger and planner.  If you love bands like Pentangle or Fairport Convention and the voice of Sandy Denny Don’t miss this twosome ,

The other artist not to be missed on the friday is Bryde, aka Sarah Howells of the band Paper Aeroplanes  Praise for the Welsh songwriter has been well-bestowed,  Bryde music deals with human psychology and the darker side of broken relationships with an infectiously defiant and life-affirming quality. Described as being about entangling and unravelling, it sways from fierce to fragile.

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I really hope there isn’t any clashes as if you can get to see these above bands already its as good as it gets a superb first day at the Deer Shed.

Saturday 

My picks for Main Stage would have to be King Creosote  also known as independent singer-songwriter Kenny Anderson from Fife with his current album “Astronaut Meets Appleman”. The first track to be shared is the album’s opener ‘You Just Want’. A seven-minute piece of hymnal drone-pop, its touchstones are the art of patience, scenes of mild bondage and Venus (in Furs) . On Astronaut Meets Appleman, King Creosote is still upsetting apple-carts and dealing with the fallout, still appraising love and life, the moon, the stars; tide tables, bagpipe scores, zeros and ones; mathematics, ticking clocks and the beat of our hearts.

Saturday includes one of my favourite bands  The Big Moon are a band I’ve seen this last two years around fifteen times great indie-pop songs full of fun and just glorious girls to boot. Based in London the four-piece girl band formed in 2014 by Juliette Jackson.[ Their debut album, “Love In The 4th Dimension was released early April 2017, containing a number of singles previously released on their EP, The Road.

The band is signed to Fiction Records and have toured internationally. The Big Moon played as backing band for Marika Hackman’s second album, I’m Not Your Man, concluding in live dates across America recently,

Check out the first artist to hit the Main Stage on Saturday Nilufer Yanya her set at Latitude was considered the best of the weekend intricate guitar work weaves around the West Londoner’s soulful vocals and jazz-flecked instrumentation.  She started performing at 18, the same year she released debut single “Waves” which she made for a college project. Rejected twice from a popular music degree, she took an artist development course and steadily graduated from the city’s open-mic scene to cooler stages, eventually supporting artists like Mitski and headlining her own shows.

Listen to the ‘The Florist’, the standout from recent EP ‘Plant Feed’ is a propulsive gem

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In the Dock Stage My other pick of the day is Goat Girl who bought out a cracking single earlier this year Their debut release track ‘Country Sleaze’ which you can hear below, was one half of a double A-Side released on Rough Trade Records last October . ‘Sleaze’ is probably an apt description for the gritty new track which packs a sludgy bass line, jangling guitar and some pure unchecked, uncensored criticism of the world right now: “I’m disgusted, I’m ashamed of this so-called human race”.

On the Lodge Stage make sure you catch the Liverpool band Hooten Tennis Club, The band’s second album ‘Big Box of Chocolates’ was produced by Edwyn Collins If their debut album, Highest Point In Cliff Town, was the band’s statement of intent, Big Box of Chocolates  is a record that retains all the colour and invention of their debut, while being elevated by richer instrumentation and lyrics that hint at slightly heavier themes: love and loss, nihilism and the ‘non-spaces’ of Northern England, all delivered in the band’s typically laconic, bittersweet style. The dozen tracks continue the band’s knack of combining catchy off-kilter riffs with droll storytelling; album narrators – vocalists and guitarists Ryan Murphy and James Madden – seem to straddle optimism and uncertainty with their lyrics, whether singing about their internal worlds or commenting on a motley cast of characters who turn up across the album’s 41 minutes to amuse, tempt or torment them. Whether fictional (the awkward genius Jimmy ‘looking shifty in his new shoes’) or real (Ryan’s ex-housemate immortalised in first single ‘Katy-Anne Bellis’), each character shares an equal platform, all revered in Hooton’s own low-key way.

The giant of a man B.C Camplight the multi-talented multi-instrumentalist Brian Christinzio is the perfect showman with his dynamic and diverse take on BC Camplight’s epic pop pizzazz and simmering balladry combining eloquent songwriting with a self-destructive bent, he’s described himself as, “the guy who blew it.” Christinzio started playing piano aged just four, inspired by his mum’s Jerry Lee Lewis and Nilsson records and his Dad’s classical collection. But this sublime talent with the keening vocal and fearless approach to lyrical introspection has another chance.

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His album ‘How To Die In The North’, recorded in his newly adopted home of Manchester, England, is a fantastically rich, stylistically diverse trip. From dramatic, layered pop to a haunted take on Sixties sunshine-pop Beach Boy’s style, from blue-eyed soul to speedy surf-pop, from sparser piano balladry to psychedelic showstopper and a grand finale that’s part Nilsson and part Broadway showtune.

Sunday

Neil Hannon

The Main Stage headliner the Divine Comedy with the superb songs of Neil Hannon a welcome return from hyper-literate songsmith. With a new album “Foreverland” out now is another iteration collection of The Divine Comedy’s virtues – sumptuous, orchestral pop laced with lyrical acerbity. The new album highlight is the brilliantly song titled and perfectly judged Sinatra pastiche “I joined The Foreign Legion (To Forget)”.without a doubt they are the suitably ideal band to close the festival .

With the shimmering sounds of guitar-synths indie pop band Teleman ‘Brilliant Sanity’ was definitely one of the top albums of the year last year, the bands minimal sound has grown into something solid and substantial with constant touring and last years sold out tour. Teleman are currently working on their third album and therefore just playing just a few select festivals this summer.

Earlier in the day plus singer songwriter Hannah Lou Clark. Its a shame that the Dock Stage has no music whatsoever on the Sunday I would love to see another 4 bands present their talents to make the day and weekend complete . In the Lodge Stage I love the sound of the Sunderland based songwriter  Martin Longstaff  under the name The Lake Poets and then later the rockier psychedelic sound of Flaming Gods, Juanita Stern could be a hidden gem if you recall the band Howling Bells who made a great record on the Bella Union label then seemed to disappear she returns with her debut solo album ‘America’ to be released late july.

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So lots to see and so many things to do especially for the kids, my only criticism is I would like to see even more music each stage could do with one more band, to make this more than the perfect festival especially when there are bands like Lewis Capaldi, George Taylor ,Estrons, Girl Ray, Gurr, Dream Wife, Blaenavon, Pumarosa, The Wharves, Palace ,Our Girl (Sophie From The Big Moon’s other band), Mammut, Japanese House, Shame , Keir, Flyte , Stevie Parker, Lemon Twigs and Lucy Rose all crisscrossing the country this weekend , The Big Moon are playing three festivals just that day as are Cabbage plus I would love to see a few more USA artists passing through.

Spoken Word & Literary line-up

Owen Jones, Tim Dowling, Stuart Heritage, Amy Liptrot, Woody Woodmansey, Ken Scott, Vanessa Kisuule, Rob Cowen, Anthony Clavane, Kate Pankhurst, Dominic Berry, Rowan McCabe, Kate Fox, Paul Cookson, Lorna Mallet, Jenna Drury, Hoglets, Say Owt Slam Poetry, Shed Talks, Pip Theatre, Mud Pie Arts and A Thoughtful Place To Be.

The highlight to look out for here is Woody Woodmansey and Ken Scott From The Beatles to Bowie, Abbey Road to Ziggy Stardust. Ken Scott best known as Beatles engineer and producer of no less than five classic David Bowie albums. Woody Woodmansey, meanwhile, is the Yorkshireman drummer from humble Driffield who boarded Bowie’s spaceship and became A Spider From Mars.

This unique event reunites them both. Ken will be talking about his new book Abbey Road to Ziggy Stardust and Woody will wow Deer Shedders with tales from and not from his recent autobiography, before a joint audience Q&A. If you ever wanted to know what it was like to be in the studio with Beatles or share a bus with Ziggy Stardust, this is a very special chance to find out.

Comedy line-up .

John Shuttleworth, Hal Cruttenden, Justin Moorhouse, Ivo Graham, Josh Howie, Bec Hill, Tom Parry, Sarah Bennetto, Scummy Mummies, Nick Doody, Edd Hedges, Patrick Monahan, Dan Nightingale and Hannah Silvester.

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That Let’s Eat Grandma’s debut album I, Gemini should feature among our favourites of the year list , We’ve been fans and supporters since their first track appeared on youtube and their appearance on Jools Holland was also a music highlights of 2016.

Their music isn’t for everyone but the best thing is, we really don’t think they care. Rosa and Jenny make a sound that is inventive, imaginative and entirely different to pretty much anything else out there right now. They make music for themselves, please themselves and to entertain themselves. It’s not really commercial – it’s not pop by numbers, it’s not landfill indie, it is simply the imagination and musicality of two incredibly talented teenagers left to run wild, and the results are magnificent.

Many of the tunes are pretty much the same as they were a couple of years ago, before the industry was aware of them and before their debut Latitude appearance became a thing of legendary gigs. A tip of the hat to Transgressive Records then for letting the pair be themselves and not trying to add significant amounts of polish or control to a sound that is at its best when it is left to just be whatever the girls want it to be.

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Two lookalike freaky kids who made one of the most lush, organic songs of the year in 2015, the mesmerising track Deep Six Textbook. Their music is as icy as PJ Harvey and as random as Bjork or Dean Blunt, arriving complete with coordinated handclaps, sax solos, wilfully obscure lyrics and jaw-dropping harmonies. There’s something a bit creepy about Let’s Eat Grandma. Their name, for starters. But their eerie childlike vocals matched with a quirky psych tinged, folk sound but with hints of electronica, shouldn’t really work. Yet it does. And the result of I, Gemini is one of the most catchy new records of the year. The teenage Norwich duo are instantly likeable and the ideas involved in their debut record hint at a very bright future.

That Let’s Eat Grandma’s debut album I, Gemini should feature on our favourites of the year list should come as no surprise to regular readers. We’ve been fans and supporters since way back when and their appearance on Jools Holland was one of our personal music highlights of 2016.

Their music isn’t for everyone but the best thing is, we really don’t think they care. In fact, we’d wager that all the critics, bloggers and armchair opinioners take it all a lot more seriously than Rosa and Jenny do. Their sound is inventive, imaginative and entirely different to pretty much anything else out there right now. They make music for themselves, please themselves and to entertain themselves. It’s not really commercial – it’s not pop by numbers, it’s not landfill indie, it’s not even punk (though some will say it is) – it is simply the imagination and musicality of two incredibly talented teenagers left to run wild, and the results are magnificent.

Many of the tunes are pretty much the same as they were a couple of years ago, before the industry was aware of them and before their debut Latitude appearance (on the tiny Inbetweeners stage) became a thing of legend. A tip of the hat to Transgressive then for letting the pair be themselves and not trying to add significant amounts of polish or control to a sound that is at its best when it is left to just be whatever the girls want it to be.

<em>I, Gemini</em> by Let’s Eat Grandma

A short time ago, Let’s Eat Grandma dressed up in baby costumes and crawled round London, and the resulting video for Sax In The City is one we’ve been itching to have out in the world. There’s a school of thought that it’s no longer possible to create anything original with pop music. With their debut I, Gemini, Let’s Eat Grandma make nonsense of such an idea. Over its ten songs teenagers Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton create a world entirely of their own making. What’s also remarkable is that whilst the music is constantly expansive – they sound like they’re backed by an orchestra at times – the pair played all of the instruments, including brass, woodwind, keys, drums and guitars, themselves.

“Just us at our favourite place, wearing our favourite colour, doing what we do best – this is the most real video of Let’s Eat Grandma yet. PS Look out for the rat.” – Rosa and Jenny

The song appears on their debut album I, Gemini, available through all good music stores.

Let’s Eat Grandma are also on tour over the next few months.