Posts Tagged ‘Anti Records’

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For every singer-songwriter who traffics in hushed, poignant melodies and writes naked and self-effacing lyrics, the specter of Elliott Smith looms large. The dearly-departed poet laureate of beautiful and bedeviling ballads died nearly two decades ago, but his influence and impact can still be felt with every new troubadour who has the courage to air their shortcomings.

Taylor Vick, the Oakland-based artist who records as Boy Scouts, makes the same kind of melancholy and elegiac music that was Smith’s specialty. While there are traces of contemporary artists like Hand Habits, Cass McCombs, and Angel Olsen in Boy Scouts, the hauntingly direct and gorgeously composed songs that make up her upcoming album, “Wayfinder”, contain all the classic hallmarks of Smith above all else. While comparisons to Elliot Smith are made often and with a certain amount of recklessness, Vick is the rare artist who truly deserves those plaudits.

On the first single from Wayfinder, “That’s Life Honey,” Vick employs the same plinking piano movements that were the driving force behind Smith’s XO, and her breathy, cooed delivery is reminiscent of the late-night requiems found on “Either/Or”. Lyrically, Vick shares Smith’s brutally honest approach to song writing, lamenting on “That’s Life Honey,” that she’s the ”Master of inexplicable shame/Write it down to rewire my brain.” Throughout Wayfinder, which is being released on Friday through ANTI- Records, Vick is unafraid to tackle enormous, existential issues of life, death, belonging, doubt and acceptance.

Her latest single, “A Lot To Ask,” is a grooving acoustic number impelled by a soft bassline and Vick’s emotive vocals. The song is again riddled with painful introspection, as Vick admits that being herself is “a lot to ask.”

While Vick has obvious links to Smith, it’s important to note that she’s a formidable and unique artist who is crafting out her own memorable identity. A careful (and at times playful) crafter of lyrics, Vick has a way of capturing the wry nature of today’s times, when you can’t help but laugh at all of life’s follies. Wayfinder is the result of an ambitious singer-songwriter unafraid to pursue the highest peaks of her genre.

Released October 1st, 2021

The latest single from Boy Scouts’ new album “Wayfinder” which is due out October 1st via ANTI-Records, is “A Lot to Ask.” “I’ve always been pretty uncomfortable with conflict and generally avoid it at all costs,” Taylor Vick says. “Until recent years, this also meant not acknowledging or wanting to look at any issues of my own. That meant a lot of feeling bad and unequipped to deal with those feelings, feeling like a burden, and obsessing over the question of ‘why am I this way!’ Instead of understanding that people can change, the issues we face can be our greatest teachers, and that vulnerability is not synonymous with weakness!”

The latest single from Boy Scouts’ new album “Wayfinder“, which is out October 1st via ANTI-Records, is “A Lot to Ask.” “I’ve always been pretty uncomfortable with conflict and generally avoid it at all costs,” Taylor Vick says. “Until recent years, this also meant not acknowledging or wanting to look at any issues of my own. That meant a lot of feeling bad and unequipped to deal with those feelings, feeling like a burden, and obsessing over the question of ‘why am I this way!’ Instead of understanding that people can change, the issues we face can be our greatest teachers, and that vulnerability is not synonymous with weakness!”

“A Lot To Ask” from the album ‘Wayfinder’, available October 1st

In a world which seems to move at a million miles an hour, it’s easy to get lost in commotion and feel completely overwhelmed by it all. Coupled with things like toxic productivity or toxic positivity, we are constantly pulled in multiple directions and sometimes it can be hard to just be. One singer resisting society’s endless clamour is Oakland-based singer-songwriter Boy Scouts. An expert at swimming around in her feelings and honing in on the uncertainty of life, she dives headfirst into uncomfortable sensations of precariousness or pain, coming up for air gripping hauntingly beautiful music. 

In her new meditative single, ‘Didn’t I’, Boy Scouts delves into existence itself; no question is too big or too small to escape her magnifying glass as she tries to make sense of her world. Opening with a gentle plodding piano melody, she instantly creates a warm place for her to unfold her findings, or lack thereof, as she slowly sings “I don’t have the answers / I have memories”. Stirring strings support her expressive voice as she wonders “maybe things are just as they seem”, meanwhile aching organs and steady guitars propel the song gently onwards.

Speaking on the single Boy Scouts pondered: “Why are we alive? Is there a point to any of this? Have I done this before? I was thinking about these questions like that, just playing with these ideas and being curious.” As the song progresses we get no closer to an answer to The Big Question, but that is the beauty of ‘Didn’t I’. Purposefully unhurried and measured vocals sit alongside equally leisurely instrumentation and we are all led into Boy Scouts’ slow-going world and given time to unwind. ‘Didn’t I’ certainly leaves us with more questions than answers but Boy Scouts’ affable vocals and soothing harmonies act like a balm to the anxieties which come hand in hand with being a person. 

Boy Scouts will return soon with her new album, Wayfinder, in October. Named for how music has acted as her personal compass, the record sees Boy Scouts delve further into life’s big questions, and find gratitude in just being alive. It’s comforting to know that in our manic world, there are others who prefer to take a step back and just be. Maybe things really are just as they seem

“Didn’t I” by Boy Scouts from the album ‘Wayfinder’, available October 1st

Hi friends! Today you can hear the B side of my new 7″, a song called “Party’s Over.” I’m so excited to share it with you!

New song and video out today, along with the limited edition 7” that includes “Orange Blossoms” as the A side! This is a song for remembering how good it feels to keep moving, letting the source of your discontent slide into the background till it blinks out like a distant star. A song for not just carving out your own path, but dancing down it. For accepting yourself for who you are. For casting aside the imagined ideals that scream at you like a neon sign: Never Enough. It’s a song for when you’re standing on the outside and you know you’re not alone. Out in this wide world, it’s a party where everyone is invited.

I wanted to write a song that would set my body into motion, propelling me away from the source of a dark feeling – the feeling of not belonging. How many times have I stood on the outside, wanting to be inside? This song is a reminder in those moments to keep moving, to feel your strength build with the distance gained, to not only carve out your own path but to dance down it. There is so much joy in releasing ourselves from what we think of as the center and discovering that the real depth of experience exists at the margins: a space that embraces our full complexity. That’s where the real party is happening.

This song is another product of my collaboration with Zubin Hensler, and the video was made with my partner-in-crime Kenna Hynes.

“Party’s Over” by Half Waif on Anti -Records

My new single “Have to Do For Now” was on NPR Music’s All Songs Considered this week

my new single. In case you missed it, I just released a new song called “Have To Do For Now”

Best Of Luck is one month old as of today! I learned so much in the process of making this record. From day one Ben Harper had my back. If he hadn’t showed up for me not only would I not have had a new record to share with you all, but I wouldn’t be out here again working across the country (and soon Europe) doing what I love night after night. Thanks Ben for your friendship and guidance. Thank you for the example you set for me to clean up my act, get sober, and get to work. This is just the start.

“Something In Return” (Live) by Christopher Paul Stelling The new album album ‘Best Of Luck,’ produced by Ben Harper, is available now

 

Half Waif, aka Nandi Rose Plunkett, released her best album yet, “The Caretaker”, last year, and now she’s revealed her first new music of 2021. She has a new 7″ due out February 24th via ANTI-Records, and she’s shared its A-side, the gorgeous, haunting “Orange Blossoms.”

“I wrote ‘Orange Blossoms’ soon after finishing The Caretaker, and in some ways, it feels like the next chapter in that story,” Nandi Rose says. “In the fall of 2019, I found myself taking care of someone close to me who was struggling with addiction, and as a caretaker often does, I internalized that immense pain and took it on as my own. It’s paralyzing, to feel so powerless when trying to help someone you love. The song came out like an incantation, a desperate plea to be rescued from wrestling with everything. But it unfolded into something more resolute as I refocused on the task of taking responsibility for myself and my own life. The song touches on a phrase that kept coming back to me at that time, which was: ‘no one’s going to do it for you.’ You can help and be helped, you can love and be loved, but salvation is your own to seek and claim.”

“Orange Blossoms” by Half Waif

Image may contain: plant and flower, text that says 'Glitterer Life Is Not A Lesson FEB. 26, 2021'

Title Fight co-frontman Ned Russin has shared a second single from his upcoming Glitterer album, “Life Is Not A Lesson”, which arrives 26th febuary via ANTI-Records (pre-order). Like lead single “Are You Sure?”, the just-released “Didn’t Want It” is a little closer to the loud, driving Title Fight sound than the last Glitterer album was, and it’s another very promising taste.

“‘Didn’t Want It’ was the first song I wrote for the new record,” Ned says. “Despite having no road map for how the rest of the songs would turn out, this track established a lot of the qualities that would be further explored as I continued to write – more present and fuzzed out guitars, minimalistic chord changes, and uncertain, longing lyrics.” It comes with an animated lyric video by Rob Fidel, which you can check out below.

“Didn’t Want It” by Glitterer​ from the album ‘Life Is Not A Lesson’, available February 26th

Image may contain: 1 person, guitar and indoor

It was a sort of dark time in my life when I was struggling to find my way. I was in a relationship when it occurred to me that a lot of times you find yourself apologizing to someone after you’ve let them down. So, the idea came to me to apologize in advance. Instead of waiting to apologize until I mess up, let me apologize before, ha ha!

The song went through a lot of changes. From point A to point B there was a bunch of things I put in and took out but what I ended up with was weirdly similar to what I started out with… In spite of that, all the things that I did were necessary. There were times when I took out the main electrical piano that I started with and tried to fill the space with something different, but it never sounded right to me, so I put it back in.

This comes up a lot, I think. You’re always looking for this vibe or tone, you want it to be as pristine and well-recorded as possible, but sometimes there’s really no substitute for the feeling you that had in the beginning. At this point I don’t even remember where I played that electric piano sound or where it came from, but after trying to duplicate it in the studio with all the grand equipment I just couldn’t seem to get the right sound. Sometimes you have to try things that are wrong to figure out what you don’t want, just to confirm that your original idea was right.”– Aaron Earl Livingston,

“Demon To The Dark” by Son Little from the album ‘New Magic,’ available September 15th

Andy Shauf Shares New Song "You Slipped Away"

Andy Shauf has shared a new song “You Slipped Away,” It was a demo recorded during the sessions for his 2020 album The Neon Skyline. “You Slipped Away” is a sombre song filled with Shauf’s subtle-but-stunning layered harmonies.

“You Slipped Away’ was a song that I wrote shortly after moving to Toronto, right after I’d just moved into an apartment and had acquired an 80s Yamaha CP60 stage piano,” Shauf says. “This song was an attempt to write something that sounded like an old standard, using big general metaphors and universal themes.”

Few artists are storytellers as deft and disarmingly observational as Andy Shauf. The Toronto-based, Saskatchewan-raised musician’s songs unfold like short fiction: they’re densely layered with colourful characters and a rich emotional depth. The The Neon Skyline 11 interconnected tracks follow a simple plot: the narrator goes to his neighbourhood dive, finds out his ex is back in town, and she eventually shows up. While its overarching narrative is riveting, the real thrill of the album comes from how Shauf finds the humanity and humour in a typical night out and the ashes of a past relationship. For The Neon Skyline, Shauf chose to start each composition on guitar instead of his usual piano. Happy accidents like Shauf testing out a new spring reverb pedal and experimenting with tape machines forced him to simplify how he’d arrange the tracks. Over the course of a year-and-a-half, Shauf had ended up with almost 50 songs all about the same night at the bar. 

“You Slipped Away” by Andy Shauf, available now Through Anti Records

The Antlers are very pleased to share another new song with you today. This one’s called “It Is What It Is,” and it’s out now via Anti Records and Transgressive. “It Is What It Is” is a song about hindsight. It considers what might have changed had you handled things differently back then, and the reluctant acceptance that it’s too late for all that now. It the inevitability of changing seasons, transitions that feel like loss in the moment, but come to represent growth over time. Accompanying the song is another beautiful video. 

The Antlers shared the video for new single ‘It Is What It Is’, which sees the New York band enlisting the skills of world-renowned contemporary dancers Bobbi-Jene Smith and Or Schraiber.

Describing the new offering, lead singer and songwriter Peter Silberman said:
“‘It Is What It Is’ is a song about hindsight. “It considers what might have changed had you handled things differently back then, and the reluctant acceptance that it’s too late for all that now. It’s the inevitability of changing seasons, transitions that feel like loss in the moment, but come to represent growth over time.”

The latest effort comes after they returned last month with ‘Wheels Roll Home’, which ended the long wait for new material from the band, whose last album came in 2014