Posts Tagged ‘Terry’

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Melbourne’s Terry has perfected a blasé, disaffected take on indie pop that smartly avoids cynicism and sarcasm. Last year’s I’m Terry, their third album in three years, is another strong collection of unassuming pop hits—often flat and plodding in that Australian way but always richly melodic, and with a warm homemade aesthetic that reflects the modesty typically found down under. Terry’s one of those bands that could’ve existed at any point in the last 30 or 40 years—they would’ve fit right in on Flying Nun—but are also always unmistakably themselves.

I’m Terry. 
They are Terry. Three LPs in three years that continue to fulfil their promise of their first 7”s: one moment a witty “art” punk Wire scramble, the next moment a dumb “pub” punk oi stomper, the next a beautifully orchestrated shimmering soundscape of rudimentary melodies cascading over one another; the point being these are disparate but always succinct songs soaked in melodies, vocal harmonies that sing-song verses and terrace chant choruses, all peppered with flourishes of synths, horns and violins.
They perfected this almost immediately, and each record is a masterful fulfillment, and so…I’m Terry.
There are so few bands attempting lyrics along these lines, so it’s worth to point toward them, as this is Terry: please be kind. We are spared the righteous indignation of identity politicians, but the empathy here for those under the boot of the colony, of the fortress, of the rich and privileged, and the disappointment and disgust at the effects of what we are calling toxic masculinity informs their more aggressive lambast, and this is delivered in an overt lyricism that doesn’t disintegrate into preach or self loathing lamentation.
There’s an unbridled joy in Terry at the experience of making songs in times they are clearly contrary to, the empathy and the pleas for kindness and all that… I’m Terry is an expression of a humbling kindness, and 2018 needs more Terry! 

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The album of the week shines in every facet of its existence. Phosphorescent (aka Matthew Houck) has meticulously crafted an intensely warm album of americana pop, drawing together a multitude of instrumental textures – from guitars and pedal steels, to synths, to his own voice – and yoking them into perfect harmony. his lush melodies are executed with the utmost sincerity, giving his music a widescreen poignancy.

There are many more tasty treats out this week…big thief vocalist Adrianne Lenker has struck out on her own with an absolute pearl of an album. sweet & understated, this collection of songs poured out of her in the moments between performing & practicing with her band, resulting in her most intimate work yet. that’s on very limited glow-in-the-dark vinyl, for people who like to listen with the lights off. picking up the tempo a little, Molly Burch’s country pop sophomore features that same beautiful, warbling voice channelled through a stronger, more confident set of songs founded upon indelible melodies.. we’ve also been loving the debut from kentucky’s the Other Years, whose angelically pure vocal harmonies, underpinned by a sweet backing of violin & banjo, are a thing of simple beauty. this is the perfect album to come home to after a strenuous day – trust. predictably, Cat Power’s new album is a stone-cold stunner! her largely acoustic set of folk-tinged, blues-tinted songs continue to prove her to be one of the strongest songwriters working today.

Further recomendations Throwing Muses’ Kristin Hersh delivers another powerful solo album of darkly melodic scuzz-songwriting Will Hoge injects his rumbly-voiced country with an invigorating dash of soul and an exhilarating bolt of rock bravado;  it’s also worth knowing that Blood Orange’s ‘negro swan’ is finally in on vinyl, amy helm’s red vinyl lp has finally popped in & settled its round little body into our shelves. & Marie Davidson’s excellent new record – which had me & mark jiving away.

Reissues this week, Bloc Party‘s classic debut ‘silent alarm’ arrives for the very first time on sturdy 180 gram vinyl. john Lennon’s ‘imagine’ gets a new stereo remaster, along with a bounty of alternate mixes & alternate takes that offer tremendous insight into his recording process. and possibily the greatest guitar album ever Television’s very seminal ‘Marquee Moon’ is in on blue vinyl, with a bonus disc of alternate versions – yum!

Imagine (2018 reissue)

John Lennon  –  Imagine (2018 reissue)

this truly unique edition of one of the most iconic albums of all time sees the timeless record remastered with a new stereo remix and some additional non-album singles.

digging through extensive archival content, Yoko and her team deliver us an incredibly personal journey through the entire songwriting and recording process – from the very first writing and demo sessions at John’s home studio at tittenhurst park through to the final co-production with Phil Spector – providing a remarkable testament of the lives of John Lennon and Yoko Ono in their own words. ***the deluxe 2cd comes with an extensive bonus disc of different mixes, demos and alternate takes. *** ***the super deluxe boxset comes with an incredibly vast array of different mixes, demos and alternate takes, the restored ‘Imagine’ and ‘Gimme Some Truth’ films and a 120 page hardcover book documenting the album’s creation***

Abysskiss

Adrianne Lenker – Abysskiss

the big thief vocalist lays down a mesmerising set of songs that are hushed & disarmingly intimate, in which we climb into her consciousness without encountering any barriers & revel in the sweet beauty of her gentle melancholy.

the songs chosen for this collection were the songs that felt the most alive in the room. these are not castaways or b-sides. some of these songs have been alive for years while some were written just days before the recording session. with this collection, Lenker further illuminates to the listening public that she is a songwriter of the highest order, following her voice & the greater voices that pass through her with an unflinching openness & clarity of translation. “it’s an invitation to peer into the hidden spaces of an extraordinary modern songwriter, where calm & quiet moment prompt superlative work”

C’est La Vie

Phosphorescent  –  C’est La Vie

Matthew Houck has crafted an electrifying collection of songs that blend a dreamy, psychedelic americana aesthetic with solid pop foundations that never fail to engage.

this album reveals a crystallisation of what made ‘Muchacho’ such a breakout record release — a little sweetness and a little menace, sometimes boot-stomping and sometimes meditative. the magic of Matthew Houck’s music has always been the way he weaves shimmering, almost golden-sounding threads through elemental, salt-of-the-earth sounds. it’s not experimental, exactly, but it’s singular and it’s definitely not traditional. that knack, the through-line across the phosphorescent catalogue, is front and centre here. fans of bon iver, iron and wine, bonnie prince billy, damien jurado and okkervil river will love this! “songs of experience make up Matthew Houck’s heavenly seventh”

First Flower

Molly Burch  –  First Flower

a walk through Molly Burch’s most intimate thoughts – broken friendships, sibling relationships and overwhelming anxiety – ‘First Flower’ is a bright, beautiful album peppered with moments of triumph with Burch’s voice as strong and dexterous as ever.

opening track “Candy” is a swinging, playful hit, while “Wild” deals with pushing away fear. title track “First Flower” is classic Burch, a simple love song that gives you goosebumps when she breaks into the chorus. but the album’s true stand-out is “To the Boys”, a courageous, sassy fuck-you to her own self-deprecation where she learns to love all the things she hated about herself. if you enjoyed angel olsen’s ‘My Woman’, this is the album for you. “more dreamy, torchy country-pop goodness from this Austin breakout”

Stardust Birthday Party

Ron Gallo –  Stardust Birthday Party

Ron Gallo’s punk-poet persona remains intact, backed by a generous injection of scuzz and fuzz.

“the details of my path are pointless because everyone’s path is different. it is about me sitting with myself for the first time and confronting the big question ‘what am i, really?’ it’s about the love and compassion for all things that enters when you find out you are nothing and everything. i think at one point i wanted to change the world, but now i know i can only change myself, or rather just strip away everything that is not me to reveal the only thing that’s ever been there. and that’s what this album is about, it’s me dancing while destroying the person i thought i was, and hopefully forever”. fans of oh sees, ty segall and warm drag should check this out

WANDERER

Cat Power  –  Wanderer

Chan Marshall’s return to the folkier, bluesier side of the tracks is very welcome on this lustrous set of understated, yet quietly powerful, acoustic ballads.

produced in its entirety by Marshall, ‘Wanderer’ includes appearances by long-time friends & compatriots, as well as guest vocals courtesy of Lana del Rey & an exquisite cover of Rihanna’s ‘Stay’. the 11 tracks encompass “my journey so far,” says Marshall. “the course my life has taken in this journey – going from town to town, with my guitar, telling my tale; with reverence to the people who did this generations before me. folk singers, blues singers, & everything in between. they were all wanderers, & i am lucky to be among them.” “the set has both strength & a lean, lustrous beauty, tapping Carole King-style classicism & american folk standards”

Fall Into the Sun

Swearin’ – Fall Into The Sun

their scuzztastic reunion has gifted us a blissful set of melodic bangers that go hard on distortion and easy on the ears.

much like the band’s previous albums, Gilbride anchored the recording and producing of the record, but this time around, the band worked to make the process feel more collaborative than ever before. “i feel like this was the first time i could look at a Swearin’ record and say that i co-produced it, and that felt really good,” said Crutchfield. Crutchfield and Gilbride always had an innate ability to mirror the other’s movements in songs, but here, they build a focused lyrical perspective across their songs, one that’s thankful for their past, but looks boldly toward the future. fans of rilo kiley, the beths, speedy ortiz and forth wanderers need to check this out!

Masana Temples

Kikagaku Moyo – Masana Temples

the psych-prog quintet return with a serene set of wah-heavy motifs, seasoned with moments of exquisitely delicate, hushed vocals.

more than the literal interpretation of being on a journey, the album’s ever-changing sonic panorama reflects the spiritual connection of the band moving through this all together. inspecting the harmonies and disparities between their evolving perspectives, the group reflects the emotional impact of their nomadic paths. the music is the product of time spent in motion and all of the bending mindsets that come with it. fans of minami deutsche and sundays & cybele should check this out.

Possible Dust Clouds

Kristin Hersh  – Possible Dust Clouds

enveloping the juxtaposition of the concept of ‘dark sunshine’, this brooding solo album expands her off-kilter sonic vision; a squally, squeaky cocktail of discordant beauty.

feedback and phasing gyrate from simply strummed normality, imagine Dinosaur jr and My Bloody Valentine cranking up a Dylan couplet. messing with both extremes of the sonic spectrum: atonal and arrhythmic, a unique sound and a glorious return to form for one of alternative rock’s true innovators. “sometimes the most subversive thing i can do musically is adhere to standard song structure, sometimes the creepiest chords are the ones we’ve heard before, twisted into different shapes” – Kristin Hersh, july 2018. “the prodigious output and commitment to quality is pretty staggering, but then Kristin Hersh is a very, very special musician.”

LIVE AT THIRD MAN RECORDS

Father John Misty – Live at Third Man Records

Live at Third Man Records covers songs from the first three of his albums, heard here stripped totally bare, you lucky tikes.  In September last year, Josh Tillman stopped by Third Man’s Nashville headquarters on an otherwise ordinary Tuesday afternoon and surprised them with a lunchtime solo, acoustic set before his sold-out Ryman Auditorium performance. They, of course, had our 1955 Scully Lathe warmed at the ready to capture the occasion. As is typical for direct-to-acetate recordings in the Blue Room, Josh warmed up the room (and our engineers) with two songs before they started cutting the LP. He began with the debut performance of his newly penned Mr. Tillman(foreshadowing its release as the first single on God’s Favorite Customer 9 months later). They then used the second song as an opportunity to carve a 12” on-the-spot single of Now I’m Learning to Love the War, which was promptly handed it to a lucky attendee for safe keeping. If you want to know more about that, you’ll have to scour the depths of FJM’s fan net. Live at Third Man Records covers songs from all three Father John Misty albums out at the time of its recording, heard here stripped totally bare

my american dream

Will Hoge  –  My American Dream

Hoge gives it his all on this blazing album of gritty, country soul, newly infused with a furious rock energy.

with ‘My American Dream’, Hoge hopes that others will follow his lead, see the world through someone else’s eyes, and maybe begin to fix the mess we’re living in. “i don’t want to write songs telling people how they should feel” Hoge says. “if anything, maybe there’s a 16- or 17-year-old kid in the small-town south who has rumblings of these feelings but doesn’t have anybody in his little community to go, ‘hey man, think about it like this for a second. here’s another group of people’s perspectives’”. fans of chris stapleton, lydia loveless, steve earle’s ‘copperhead road’ and nikki lane will love this!

ICON OF EGO

Arc Iris  –  Icon of Ego

the trio’s third is a vividly expressionistic record that reflects their protean talents, creating an avantgarde experimental pop that’s entirely their own.

‘Icon of Ego’ finds a stronger, more experienced band. the band has evolved into a concentrated pop-prog explosion, mixing styles with disparate elements that captivate and surprise. with heavy synthesiser work by Tenorio and Jocie Adams, and seemingly impossible transitions executed effortlessly by Belli, the songs here carry a thick, analogue electronic sound that harks back to the ’70s. presiding over these are Adams’ powerful vocals that house the energy under pop forms. fans of cocorosie and deerhoof should check these guys out.

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Terry – I’m Terry

the Melbourne quartet capture their particular kind of witty diy, garage pop beautifully on this lp.

there are few rules in Terry’s world. “they seem to make a song out of whatever sounds good to them. the only stylistic consistency is in their hat wear. terry are like Steely Dan or 10cc. both bands make me queasy after a certain point. Terry probably also make me a bit queasy, singing about police beatings and nationalism and all that. but they’re not out to hurt you. they’re like the kindly bearer of bad news. Terry puts it in terms that speak to me. it’s a tragicomedy.” – fans of the go-betweens, courtney barnett and rolling blackouts coastal fever need to hear this.

henry / I

Soccer Mommy – Henry / I’m on Fire

Soccer Mommy aka Sophie Allison puts her own heavenly spin on the boss’ timeless classic, plus reworks the lead track from her obscure 2016 album ‘For Young Hearts’, previously only physically available as a rare cassette release. we think she’s done Bruce proud. Soccer Mommy is a must for fans of snail mail, phoebe bridgers, lucy dacus and julien baker.

LIVE AT THIRD MAN RECORDS

Kevin Morby – Live at Third Man Records

Kevin Morby performs two tracks for third man, stripping them down and revealing something completely new, in relation to their studio counterparts.

Formally a member of New York folk group Woods, Kevin Morby has made a name for himself with his four acclaimed solo releases. these songs, “Destroyer” and “Black Flowers”, come from his third record ‘Singing Saw’. “Destroyer” is an autobiographical minimalistic keyboard ballad, a distant cousin of the full band album version. “Black Flowers” on this single borrows less from the sweeping orchestras of leonard cohen’s catalogue and more from the melancholic austerity of bert jansch.

Image of TERRY - 'I'm Terry' (PRE-ORDER)

Terry are back with another bundle of joy. Terry are Amy Hill (also of Constant Mongrel, School Of Radiant Living), Xanthe Waite (Mick Harvey Band, Primo), Zephyr Pavey (Eastlink, Total Control, Russell St Bombings) and Al Montfort (UV Race, Dick Diver, Total Control). Guitars, bass, drums, all four sing. New album I’m Terry is like a mix of minimal and childlike indie pop and an obscure post punk album from 1979.

Have I been able to contain my excitement over the new Terry LP? Not quite. The band’s on a streak, with two great LPs under their belts already. The third LP shows no signs of flagging as they continue to mine a strain of post-punk peppered with twang and salt n’ honey harmonies that are soothing yet unpolished. The band let loose one of the album’s most ecstatic singles, “The Whip,” a few weeks back and now they follow it up with the cooler-headed “Bureau,” a stunner in its own right.

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Terry’s strength lies in an ability to push past any of the well-worn ruts of post-punk. They’re embracing the ethos of bands who were set free to run dub and punk and pop together into a caustic clash, but they’re not tied down to the set of stencils that so many modern makers seem to use.

This is the 3rd album from this Melbourne group, maintaining the high melodic standards but some of the songs are a bit longer and the atmospheres are a bit darker at times.

They pair the new song with a grit n’ glare video that’s transportation heavy – grabbing the ‘70s aesthetics and pushing them through a DIY filter. Its all good fun and serves to further the excitement for the Upset The Rhythm release of I’m Terry at the end of the month. If you’re in the UK, they’re even trotting the show out live (lucky bastards) so hit that up to see how these songs shake out in the room.

Think a mix of Beat Happening, The Mo-Dettes and The Television Personalties.

‘Oh Helen’ is taken from TERRY’s brand new, third album ‘I’m Terry’, coming out August 31st through Upset The Rhythm.

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Terry returned this week with the first track from their new album ‘I’m Terry’.
The Whip kicks the jangles aside, clips a driving punk guitar line to a curdled coif of organ squeal and gives this track an off the rails quality that’s biting harder than usual for the laid-back bunch. While I love the band’s cowpunk preening and clang-hearted dirges its good to see them go for the pop pounce – albeit with enough squirm to make it pure Terry.
‘The Whip’ is taken from TERRY’s brand new, third album ‘I’m Terry’, coming out August 31st through Upset The Rhythm Records.

This LP is, a ripper. Perfect from start to finish with it’s jangly sounds and melodies, but still with a fair bit of an edge to it. It’s hard not to listen to it all in the one sitting, though at only 22 and a half minutes you pretty much can anyway. The short length of the album is the only fault I can find, and Chitter Chatter is the standout track.  was among my Top 100 Albums Of 2016 .
Terry is the bastard child of everything great about Australian post-punk and for lack of a better word ‘slacker’ rock. Live they become something even more powerful. A true cult classic

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TERRY a band from Melbourne, Australia. Divide him in half and you split the genders, into quarters and you get Amy Hill (also of Constant Mongrel, School Of Radiant Living), Xanthe Waite (Mick Harvey Band, Primo), Zephyr Pavey (Eastlink, Total Control, Russell St Bombings) and Al Montfort (UV Race, Dick Diver, Total Control). Guitars, bass, drums, all four sing. Terry are busy people and Terry is a particularly active project too, having released two EPs and a full length album (‘Terry HQ’) last year on Upset The Rhythm Records.

Kane

Kane Strang – Two Hearts and No Brain

A winning blend of careful precision and mercurial abandon, Kane Strang’s new album Two Hearts and No Brain is constantly surprising. With a penchant for melodic earworms to rival those of the world’s best pop songwriters, the New Zealand artist’s glittering hooks twist and turn in perfect synch with meticulous band arrangements. Hints of 60s pop (NB: Zombies, Stooges) and early 00’s alt-rock (Interpol, Elliott Smith) shine through; but there’s a contemporary crunch, sheen and bald lyrical tone to Strang’s sound that places him firmly in the here and now. Strang’s proclivity for writing smart, anthemic guitar pop shines brightest now that he has moved away from the bedroom and into the studio. Showcasing his new collaborative approach to recording and writing with his band, the four-piece twists Strang’s melodies upside down and pushes his hooks inside out. Two Hearts and No Brain proves emotive and playfully laced with a tongue-in-cheek nostalgia – timelessly old and new in the same breath.

Remember terry cover

Terry  –  Remember Terry

Terry is a band from Melbourne, Australia. Divide him in half and you split the genders, into quarters and you get Amy Hill (also of Constant Mongrel, School Of Radiant Living), Xanthe Waite (Mick Harvey Band, Primo), Zephyr Pavey (Eastlink, Total Control, Russell St Bombings) and Al Montfort (UV Race, Dick Diver, Total Control). Guitars, bass, drums, all four sing. Terry are busy people and Terry is a particularly active project too, having released two EPs and a full length album (Terry HQ) last year on Upset The Rhythm. After returning from summer 2016’s European tour, Terry set about writing a new album of songs. These are now grouped together as Remember Terry, an album full of wish fulfilment, critiqued characters, memorial muscle and historical hustle. The truth is in there, just skating below the surface of their glammy, country-stepping punk/pop odysseys, we only have to listen carefully. Remember Terry is a fitting follow-up to last year’s celebrated debut album. Ideas are pursued and new ground explored. Throughout this expansion of sound and subject-matter though, Terry remain committed to telling it straight, reporting from the frontline of the political made personal. Remember Terry was recorded by Terry at Grace Lane and Terry HQ through the first few months of 2017. Digitised by Nick Kuceli. Mixed and Mastered by Mikey Young.

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The Myrrors – Hasta La Victoria

Hasta La Victoria comes just one year after Entranced Earth, and serves as its perfect companion piece. And yet, not a moment of the albums thirty-seven minutes ever feels even remotely rushed, or anything short of natural. Indeed, in the best possible way, Hasta La Victoria sounds like The Myrrors couldnt be doing anything else. Perhaps its not the victory in the albums title that focuses the bands attention perhaps its the until. Throughout Hasta La Victoria, the band sounds utterly propelled by an invisible force, by the indelible impression that their actions as a band, as artists, as people have an impact, and that impact should continue until victory. Be here now or be here later, there’s little doubt that The Myrrors will be continuing to walk the path when you get here.

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Triptides -Afterglow

As the tides of the ocean draw their power from the moon above, the music of Triptides is fueled by the mind-bending inspiration and wide-ranging creative talents of Glenn Brigman (vocals and guitar), Josh Menashe (guitar and vocals), Dylan Sizemore (bass guitar) and Shaugnessy Starr (drums). The trip began in the bohemian basements of Bloomington, Indiana in 2010, where Glenn and Josh shared ideas and influences before evolving to craft a complex yet cohesive range of lush, “psychedelic beach-pop” sounds. Two EPs and four LPs later, Triptides are now an essential element of the Los Angeles psych scene, where they are preparing to launch their newest album, Afterglow. Inspired by the spirit of ’60s and ’70s West Coast pop and psychedelia, as well as legendary albums ranging from The Piper at the Gates of Dawn to The Notorious Byrd Brothers,

Beach House -B-Sides and Rarities

Beach House release the B-Sides and Rarities album, a 14-track compilation of songs from throughout their career so far. The album features two previously unreleased tracks Chariot and Baseball Diamond, which were recorded during the Depression Cherry and Thank Your Lucky Stars sessions, both albums of which were released two months apart in 2015.

LP – Black Vinyl packaged in colour inner and spot varnished deluxe cardstock outer sleeve with digital download code.

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The Cure – Acoustic Hits

First time on vinyl for The Cure’s acoustic rendition of their Greatest Hits. This was a limited edition CD which accompanied the 2001 Greatest Hits compilation and has never appeared on vinyl. The Record Store Day 2017 Release was a Double Picture Disc and now gets re-released on Double 180 Gram Black Vinyl.

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The Rolling Stones – The Complete British Radio Broadcasts 1963 – 1965

Legendary performances on various BBC radio shows from the 1960’s. Digitally remastered for greatly enhanced sound quality. ‘In view of the past increase of interest in rhythm and blues groups in Britain, an exceptionally good future is predicted for us by many people,’ Brian Jones wrote to the BBC in January 1963, requesting an audition. They turned him down, but soon changed their mind. Between that autumn and the summer of 1965, the Stones recorded numerous classic radio sessions for the Beeb, which are presented here together with background notes and images. Containing some of the most vital British R&B ever recorded, the set is an essential purchase for serious Stones fans.

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The Beach Boys -1967 – Sunshine Tomorrow

1967 – Sunshine Tomorrow  is a unique 2CD collection from The Beach Boys – arguably one of the greatest bands of all-time. Featuring producers Mark Linett and Alan Boyd’s new, first–ever stereo mix of the 1967 Wild Honey album. As well as opening up the legendary band’s vault to debut 54 sought-after rarities from that year, 50 years after they were first put to tape. This collection dives into a fascinating and frenetic chapter in The Beach Boys’ long, groundbreaking creative arc, exploring the band’s dynamic year in the studio and on tour. Previously unreleased highlights include The Beach Boys’ shelved ‘live’ album, Lei’d in Hawaii, studio recordings from the Wild Honey and Smiley Smile album sessions, and live concert recordings from shows in Hawaii, Washington DC and Boston.

Melbourne glam pop country bops Terry. The album is entitled ‘Remember Terry’ and will be released through Upset The Rhythm on June 30th. They will be touring Europe around the same time, so watch this space and also watch this brand new video for lead single ‘Take Me To The City’

After returning from summer 2016’s European tour, Terry set about writing a new album of songs. These are now grouped together as ‘Remember Terry’, an album full of wish fulfilment, critiqued characters, memorial muscle and historical hustle.‘Start The Tape’ is a not quite two-minute careen through what Terry are best known for; gang vocals, chased-down melodies and acerbic commentary. “The Boys in Blue are no nonsense, but no nonsense just won’t hold up” they assert throughout the song, amid unbridled drum rolls and keyboard sirens.

Terry draw on their everyday realities to make personal conclusions; “I can’t live here, I can’t leave here” they collectively sing through the strummed guitars and skittling synths of ‘Heavin Heavies’. Somehow the serious nature of the themes handled in their songs are only further emphasised by the tuneful, arguably ‘sing-along’ treatment Terry usually employ. ‘Give Up The Crown’, ‘The Colonel’ and ‘Gun’ are other prime examples of this, packed full of assembled vocal harmonies, contagious riffs and rhetoric.

With tracks like ‘Glory’ and ‘Homage’, Terry allow us for the first time to see a more laid-back side of his personality. Supplemented with fluorescing synth lines and adopting an unhurried pace, both songs lull you into a false sense of pleasantry, only to pack a greater punch when lyrics like “Off his bloody head goes” or “No head, no choice, no land, no time, no crime, no good” surface. ‘Take Me To The City’ is a similarly evocative stroll through the “bright night city lights”, with Amy and Xanthe listing their nightlife observations over languorous guitar lines and programmed drums. Their “all they talk about..” refrain drifts off effortlessly into dazed disclosures. Terry prefer to make a profound point in a quiet way, hectoring bypassed for self-revelation. The truth is in there, just skating below the surface of their glammy, country-stepping punk/pop odysseys, we only have to listen carefully.

‘Remember Terry’ is a fitting follow-up to last year’s celebrated debut album. Ideas are pursued and new ground explored. Throughout this expansion of sound and subject-matter though, Terry remain committed to telling it straight, reporting from the frontline of the political made personal. ‘Remember Terry’ was recorded by Terry at Grace Lane and Terry HQ through the first few months of 2017.

Taken from the band’s new album ‘Remember Terry’ out June 30th on Upset The Rhythm.

TERRY – ” Terry “

Posted: December 22, 2016 in ALBUMS, MUSIC
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Terry is the bastard child of everything great about Australian post-punk and for lack of a better word ‘slacker’ rock. Live they become something even more powerful.

This LP is, as they say in Australia, a ripper. Perfect from start to finish with it’s jangly sounds and melodies, but still with a fair bit of an edge to it. It’s hard not to listen to it all in the one sitting, though at only 22 and a half minutes you pretty much can anyway. The short length of the album is the only fault I can find, and Chitter Chatter is, I reckon, one of the tracks of the year.

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TERRY – ” Terry HQ “

Posted: July 6, 2016 in MUSIC
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Droll and smart, gleamingly melodic with seemingly little effort, and attuned to post-punk past but not in thrall to it Terry’s debut delivers on the foursome’s pedigree, which includes Australian groups UV Race, Dick Diver, Total Control, and others. The songs delight in how they dawdle, constructed from playful percussion, melodically entwined voices, and lollygagging leads. Rickety-but-golden pop groups are the key touchstones: think Television Personalities or Lower Plenty. The skeletal arrangements would tempt the tag lazy if they weren’t so artfully restrained.

Entry points include the muddied glam of “Don’t Say Sorry” and the Rough Trade-indebted stomp of “Uncle Greg 1,” but it’s the shambolic and allusive bulk of Terry HQ that demands repeat listening. Initially, these songs bring to mind the ennui that’s lately characterized a lot of underground Australian pop, but they fight against that apolitical trend in a refreshing way. The lyrics, delivered deadpan and resigned, abound with ghastly images of destruction and plague. Arresting contrasts emerge: On “Third War,” the thrum of acoustic guitar settles in like dawn, while the lyrics invoke the “roar of death.” “Hang-men,” the funereal finale, couples cozy quotidian details with jarring references to slaughter.

The album draws upon somewhat dated images of warfare–bombs, knives, and “love letters from the front”—to articulate what seems like a harrowing, perhaps cautionary, vision of the future. To be clear, Terry HQ is not a topical record. Direct connections to global conflict or Australia’s neoliberal regime seem tenuous. But just as the science fiction of yore often ends up prescient, the grim allure of Terry HQ rests in the possibility that it anticipates pervasive loss and sadness, if not particular events, looming on the historical horizon.