Posts Tagged ‘The Rolling Stones’

The Rolling Stones ‘On Air’, a selection of BBC recordings from the 1960’s which offer a unique insight into the formative days of the band.
This is the Stones where it all started, playing the music they loved so much – Blues, R&B and even Country. These four years of radio studio recordings mirror The Rolling Stones live shows across the UK and the world, and mark the band’s rise to global stardom. On Air features recordings of the band on a number of BBC radio programs including Saturday Club, Top Gear, Rhythm and Blues and The Joe Loss Pop Show
Every track has gone through an extensive process called ‘Audio Source Separation’ at Abbey Road. This is a revolutionary approach to restoring older recordings and you will be able to hear the remarkable difference this makes to each song, whilst keeping the authenticity of the time.

‘Come On’ is taken from The Rolling Stones forthcoming album ‘On Air’ – a collection of classics, covers and previously unreleased recordings from the bands formative years – all recorded live from the BBC. ‘On Air’ is due for release on December 1st, early copies on Yellow Vinyl.

Advertisements

The Bridges to Babylon Tour

According to Mick Jagger, “The title came from looking at the stage. Because it was going to be the name of the tour as well as the record—it all had to fit together. We were looking at the stage one day and trying to find where we were with it. What does this design say to us? I came up with the ‘Bridges’ idea and a friend of mine came up with the Babylon thing. The bridge to the B-stage worked perfectly most nights, except when it was too cold or too hot, and then it had to be sort of manually got together. It was always my worry that it wasn’t gonna actually open.”

The Bridges To Babylon tour was announced in a press conference held underneath the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City and began on 9th September 1997 with a warm up show in Toronto, Canada, followed by another at The Double Door In Chicago. It officially began on 23rd September at Chicago’s Soldier Field followed by 55 more shows in North America, nine shows in South America, six shows in Japan and thirty-seven shows in Europe.

The production was designed by Mark Fisher, Charlie Watts, Mick Jagger and Patrick Woodroffe and opened with a circular central screen exploding with fireworks, from which guitarist Keith Richards emerged playing the riff to “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”.

This was the first tour on which the B-stage featured at almost every gig; the stage design included a 46 m (150 ft) long telescoping cantilever bridge that extended from the main stage to a ‘B’ stage in the centre of the stadiums. The only issue according to Keith was the fact that out door shows had the unpredictability of the weather to contend with.

“There’s another guy that joins the band on outdoor stages: God. Either he’s benign or he can come at you with wind from the wrong direction and the sound is swept out of the park. The weather normally comes good around show time… but not always.’ Keith

Keith also pointed out that, “The bigger shows are harder to play, even though that’s what we do most of the time, because we are so locked into lighting systems and computers: the more constructed you have to be, because of the size of the operation. When we play on the B-stage or at a club venue, for us it’s just like coming back home—sweating it up a bit.”

Babylon oslo

All in all this was another massive step forward in terms of the number of people who came watched The Stones perform: 4.8 million at 108 shows in 25 countries.

It concluded on 19th September 1998 in Istanbul, Turkey. Five shows were cancelled (in Marseilles, Paris, Lyon, Bilbao and Gijón), and five more were postponed (in Italy, Ireland and Great Britain).

As the ’90s wore on, Jagger became concerned with keeping the Rolling Stones fresh. That led directly to some of the dated experimentation on Bridges to Babylon, released on September. 23rd, 1997.

“There is a great danger when you’ve done all these albums … that you think you know how to make a record,” Jagger said in 1997. “Someone writes a song and there is something in the song that you recognize: ‘Oh, I know what that is. I’ll get my slide guitar.’ I don’t want to do that first thing that comes to mind.”

Over-worried about sounding too much like themselves after succumbing to a kind of easy classicism on 1994’s Voodoo Lounge, the Rolling Stones ended up going too far the other way. That meant bringing in then-hip producers John King and Mike Simpson. Known professionally as the Dust Brothers, they’d most recently been working with Beck.

“Anybody Seen My Baby,” the lead-off single, was doomed to parody by their decision to include a sample of Biz Markie‘s 1986 track “One Two.” Deep cuts like “Might as Well Get Juiced” suffered too, as its generically electronic backing track felt somehow both relentless and largely without detail. Hiding somewhere within this tune is something that could have harkened back to the edgy smack-laced danger of 1972’s Exile on Main St. The loop-driven “Saint of Me,” written in tribute to their late long-time sideman Billy Preston, suffers a similar fate. It’s a pretty good Stones song lost in a maze of studio tricks.

Jagger even brought in the sleek R&B producer Babyface to work on “Already Over Me” at one point, before discarding the tapes. “It’s full of fance – that’s funk and dance put together,” guitarist Ron Wood enthused in a 1997 . Fans were less enthusiastic, as the album became the Rolling Stones’ first ever – including 1986’s lightly regarded Dirty Work – to finish outside the U.K. Top 5. Bridges to Babylon ended up selling a million copies, but that was far less than the multi-platinum sales of their two most recent studio projects.

You could hardly blame Keith Richards. Favoring an abandoned back-to-basics approach, he ended up contributing some of his strongest material, and simply stayed well away from the more modernized stuff. Waddy Wachtel, the ace Los Angeles session guitarist, sat in on “Anybody Seen My Baby,” which was rumored to have been about actress Mary Badham of To Kill a Mockingbird fame. Richards doesn’t even appear on “Saint of Me.”

He claimed there were no hard feelings, despite early reports of tensions in the studio. “You always have to deal with other people’s preconceptions of what their version of the Stones is – and we can’t be everything to everybody,” said Richards “All we can do is be true to ourselves as much as possible, and say, ‘This is us now, take it or leave it.’”

Richards collaborated exclusively with stalwart Stones producer Don Was on the reggae-inflected “You Don’t Have to Mean It,” the soul-drenched “Thief in the Night” and his devastatingly sad album-closing “How Can I Stop.” All of them would have sounded more at home on one of Richard’s then-recent solo projects, For his part, Richards argued that while Bridges to Babylon may not have always worked, it had at least been interesting.

Love You Live

Here’s where it all started falling apart for the group. Culled from the Rolling Stones’ soul-draining 1975-76 tour, along with a pair of club shows in Toronto from 1977 (right after Keith Richards‘ famous bust), ‘Love You Live’ is a mess at times. Nobody could agree on the track listing, the performances are sometimes languid at best and not one Stone seems to be having a good time. It’s no surprise that many of the songs were later overdubbed to make it palatable to fans’ ears.

It wasn’t a surprise that the Rolling Stones were in Toronto in the winter of 1977. The Royal Mounted Police had alerted the world to the band’s Canadian presence due to one of the biggest drug busts in rock history.

In late February, Stones guitarist Keith Richard was found with an large amount of heroin and cocaine in his possession. The incident made international news because Richards was initially charged with trafficking (due to the large amounts) and there was a possibility that the rock star could be headed for a long jail sentence.

The other Stones, who had already been in Toronto practicing, were less than thrilled. Not just for the obvious reasons, but because Richards has potentially blown their cover. Months earlier, frontman Jagger and his manager Peter Rudge had set up a pair of secret Stones shows at the city’s El Mocambo Club with the idea of using some of the live recordings for a forthcoming concert album.

Secrecy was paramount because the upper level at the El Mo (as it’s known) only can contain about 300 people. If the Stones’ cover got blown, the shows would quickly become a media circus – especially with what was going on with Richards. The El Mocambo’s booker, Dave Bluestein, came up with a misdirection. He would schedule Montreal’s April Wine to play March 4th and 5th at the club.

“We had natural cover,” Bluestein said, “because if anything got out, we could say, ‘No, look, April Wine is playing. That’s the gig.’

April Wine was billed along with an unknown band, called the Cockroaches. Of course, in reality, the Canadian rockers were set to open for the biggest band in the world.

In order to ensure that the gigs were attended by friendly crowds, Roman devised a radio contest in which Stones fans could enter to see April Wine. He and Stones members handpicked the winners, who were told of the actual plan while on the bus en route to the gig. The guests entered through the back of the club to cut down on any chance hysteria.

That night, after April Wine’s opening set, the Rolling Stones took the El Mocambo stage, the arena-rocking band’s first club show in 14 years. Richards remembers being thankful for having something positive to do, after all of his legal and media woes.

“The minute I got onstage, it felt just like another Sunday gig at the Crawdaddy,” Richards recalled. “It immediately felt the same… It was one of those weird things in Toronto. Everybody’s going around talking doom and disaster, and we’re up onstage at the El Mocambo and we never felt better. I mean, we sounded great.”

Ronnie Wood then a relatively recent edition to the Stones, has claimed he had a major influence on the setlists for the two El Mocambo concerts. The band’s other guitarist was able to convince Mick and the boys to include some of the group’s earlier, bluesy material.

“Yeah, it was a good time of development for me,” Wood said. “I made them play ‘Come On’ [the Stones actually didn’t play this], ‘Little Red Rooster,’ all those blues standars. Right from the first song I felt very pleased at the fact that no one said, ‘Oh, we can’t do that one, it’s too old.’ Everyone just went straight into them.”

Although Woody is mistaken about Chuck Berry’s “Come On,” they did play his “Around and Around,” as well as Muddy Waters’s “Mannish Boy” and Bo Diddley’s “Crackin’ Up.” Although the Stones performed plenty of their self-written tunes, from “Honky Tonk Women” to “Hand of Fate” to “Brown Sugar,” the blues and R&B covers must have stood out. It was those songs that eventually ended up on a Stones live album.

In fact, when Love You Live (the band’s third live album) came out on September. 23rd, 1977, side 3 of the double LP set was composed solely of covers recorded at the El Mocambo. Well, they were mostly recorded there. Story goes that both Wood and Richards overdubbed guitar parts and backing vocals while Jagger redid the harmonica part for “Mannish Boy.” Only “Around and Around” went untouched.

It’s not sure if the same can be said for Canada’s then-first lady Margaret Trudeau, who was separated from Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. She caused a media furor when she was spotted with Jagger in the days before and after the shows (though she was officially Ronnie’s guest at the gigs). When the news of the potential fling reached her estranged husband, he reportedly said, “I hope that she doesn’t start to see the Beatles .”

The Rolling Stones ‘Sticky Fingers’The Alternate Album (1970/1971 Outtakes & Unreleased) Studio Recordings

00:00 – brown sugar (early vocal/no lead guitar, mono) 3.42 03:42 – sway (no overdubs, mono) 3.24 07:06 – wild horses (unplugged stereo mix, no overdubs) 5.28 12:34 – good time women (early version of “tumbling dice”) 3.14 15:48 – silver train (early version) 3.23 19:11 – you gotta move (mono-mix) 2.30 21:41 – bitch (original 7” mono-mix) 3.33 25:14 – i got the blues (mono-mix, recorded off monitor) 3.36 28:50 – sister morphine (basic stereo-mix) 5.24 34:14 – dead flowers (Alternate Mix) 4.02 38:16 – all down the line (early rehearsal) 4.18 42:34 – travellin’ man (unreleased song) 5.56 48:30 – potted shrimp (unreleased instrumental) 4.08 52:38 – aladdin story (unreleased instrumental) 3.55 56:33 – leather jacket (unreleased instrumental) 3.27 1:00:00 – wild horses (1969 rehearsal/keith and mick taylor) 1.30 1:01:30 – wild horses (gram parsons on pedal steel guitar) 5.21 1:06:51 – brown sugar (different guitar part) 3.46 1:10:37 – brown sugar (another different mix) 3.46 1:14:23 – brown sugar (original 7” mono-mix) 3.50 1:18:13 – let it rock 2.35 (recorded at leed university, 13 march 1971. was included on spanish “sticky fingers” lp in place of sister morphine, and as a third song on uk-brown sugar 7” original mono-mix)

 

Later this month sees the release of From The Vault – Sticky Fingers: Live At The Fonda Theatre 2015. This unique performance footage captures the only time the Stones played the whole Sticky Fingers album in its entirety, live on stage. This latest addition to the From The Vaults series captures a truly unique event in the long and eventful history of The Rolling Stones.

On the 20th May 2015 at the Fonda Theatre in Hollywood, California, the band performed the entire Sticky Fingers album live in concert for the first and so far only time in their career. The show celebrated the reissue of the Sticky Fingers album and was the opening night of The Rolling Stones Zip Code Tour of North America that would run over the next two months. The intimate setting of the Fonda Theatre was in contrast to the huge stadiums in which the band would perform for the rest of the tour and made this an incredibly special occasion for those fans lucky enough to get a ticket.

Stones poster

The Rolling Stones opened their No Filter European tour last night (9th September) with a spectacular show at Stadtpark in Hamburg. The 14-date, 12-venue itinerary got under way with a new stage design, at the first public concert in the location for 28 years. The Rolling Stones kicked off their 2017 No Filter Tour on Saturday 9th September 2017 in Hamburg, Germany. Opening with Sympathy For The Devil they delivered an electrifying set, featuring songs throughout the decades, including Play With Fire and Dancing With Mr. D.

The Stones delighted the massive crowd of 82,000 fans with a 22-song setlist that included many staples of their storied career such as ‘It’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll,’ ‘Honky Tonk Woman’, ‘Start Me Up’ and ‘Brown Sugar.’ The band are also featuring a public vote to choose one lesser-performed number from their catalogue for each show. Last night’s winner was ‘Under My Thumb.’

 

The show also featured several other songs that the Stones feature less often in their set, including ‘Play With Fire’ from Out Of Our Heads and ‘Dancing With Mr. D’ from Goats Head SoupKeith Richards’ traditional vocal feature spot included not just his trademark Exile On Main Ststaple ‘Happy’ but the Steel Wheels gem ‘Slipping Away.’

There was also space in the set for the band to perform ‘Just Your Fool’ and ‘Ride ‘Em On Down,’ from their current, hugely popular blues album Blue & LonesomeThe show reached its climax with ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’,  ‘Gimme Shelter’  and  ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash.’

The tour now moves to the Olympic Park in Munich on Tuesday (12th) where, as last night, the opening act will be the Icelandic band Kaleo. They will be joined at the show in Spielberg, Austria on 16th September by John Lee Hooker Jr. The No Filter tour continues into late October, concluding with three shows on the 19th, 22nd and 25th of that month at the U Arena. Support there comes from Cage The Elephant; other dates feature the Struts, Los Zigarros, de Staat, Rival Sons, the Hellacopters and Leon Bridges.

Their Satanic Majesties Request

The Rolling Stones would not be the first band one might think of in connection with the Summer of Love and the blossoming sound of psychedelia.  Yet the Stones spent much of 1967, on and off, recording the album that became “Their Satanic Majesties Request”.  Wholly unique in the band’s catalogue, it fused the band’s gritty sensibility with psychedelic effects, more lavish instrumentation, and experimental sounds.  Underscoring its nature as a conceptual work, it was also the first album by the Rolling Stones to feature identical track listings on both sides of the Atlantic.  The album is receiving a 50th anniversary box set from ABKCO.  On September 22nd, the label will reissue the album as a 2-LP/2-hybrid SACD collection featuring both the stereo and mono versions of every song, as newly remastered by Bob Ludwig. Their Satanic Majesties Request – 50th Anniversary Special Edition is appropriately decked out with Michael Cooper’s original 3-D lenticular cover photograph.

Following the departure of Andrew Loog Oldham midway through recording, after numerous clashes with the band, Their Satanic Majesties Request became the first self-produced album from the Stones.  Released in December 1967 as the band’s sixth British and eighth American studio album, it arrived on the Decca label in the United Kingdom and London Records in the United States.   Though critics were initially lukewarm, it’s risen in stature over the years, and has attracted cover versions from artists ranging from KISS to The Damned and Arcade Fire.  During its recording, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Bill Wyman, and Charlie Watts were joined by guests including a pre-Led Zeppelin John Paul Jones providing string arrangements, plus pianist Nicky Hopkins, and background vocalists Steve Marriott and Ronnie Lane of the Small Faces.

Historian Rob Bowman provides the box set’s new liner notes, placing the album into context of one of the band’s wildest periods and making the case for it as a benchmark release as the group transitioned from edgy R&B to pure rock.  “She’s a Rainbow” (a minor hit in the U.S.) and “2,000 Light Years from Home” capture the band at their most potently psychedelic, while “Citadel” anticipated the harder-rocking direction that would soon be embraced.  “Sing All This Together,” “Gomper,” and “On with the Show” showcase a looser, more freeform style of songwriting and playing.  “In Another Land” has landmark status, too, as the only Rolling Stones track both written and sung by bassist Bill Wyman.  He was joined on the song by Marriott and Lane (recording next door) on vocals, Marriott on guitar, Hopkins on harpsichord, Watts on drums, and Mick and Keith on vocals.

BUY NOW FROM AMAZON.COM

Their Satanic Majesties Request – 50th Anniversary Special Edition restores Michael Cooper’s original lenticular cover artwork, and the discs are housed in a fold-out album-style numbered package with a 20-page book including more of Cooper’s photos from the original session. As the album was originally issued in both stereo and mono, the upcoming edition will include the entire remastered album on 180-gram vinyl in stereo, another 180-gram vinyl record in mono, and two hybrid Super Audio CDs (one in stereo and one in mono).  Hybrid SACDs are playable in all CD players.  No additional outtakes or session material has been added to this collection.

Look for the special edition box on September 22 from ABKCO!  Pre-order links are live, below!

The Rolling Stones, Their Satanic Majesties Request – 50th Anniversary Special Edition

50 years after its release, The Rolling Stones’ Their Satanic Majesties Request receives a deluxe 2LP and 2CD reissue, newly remastered and featuring replica ground-breaking 3D artwork plus book. Limited numbers available with free psychedelic slipmat!

Kane

Kane Strang – Two Hearts and No Brain

A winning blend of careful precision and mercurial abandon, Kane Strang’s new album Two Hearts and No Brain is constantly surprising. With a penchant for melodic earworms to rival those of the world’s best pop songwriters, the New Zealand artist’s glittering hooks twist and turn in perfect synch with meticulous band arrangements. Hints of 60s pop (NB: Zombies, Stooges) and early 00’s alt-rock (Interpol, Elliott Smith) shine through; but there’s a contemporary crunch, sheen and bald lyrical tone to Strang’s sound that places him firmly in the here and now. Strang’s proclivity for writing smart, anthemic guitar pop shines brightest now that he has moved away from the bedroom and into the studio. Showcasing his new collaborative approach to recording and writing with his band, the four-piece twists Strang’s melodies upside down and pushes his hooks inside out. Two Hearts and No Brain proves emotive and playfully laced with a tongue-in-cheek nostalgia – timelessly old and new in the same breath.

Remember terry cover

Terry  –  Remember Terry

Terry is a band from Melbourne, Australia. Divide him in half and you split the genders, into quarters and you get Amy Hill (also of Constant Mongrel, School Of Radiant Living), Xanthe Waite (Mick Harvey Band, Primo), Zephyr Pavey (Eastlink, Total Control, Russell St Bombings) and Al Montfort (UV Race, Dick Diver, Total Control). Guitars, bass, drums, all four sing. Terry are busy people and Terry is a particularly active project too, having released two EPs and a full length album (Terry HQ) last year on Upset The Rhythm. After returning from summer 2016’s European tour, Terry set about writing a new album of songs. These are now grouped together as Remember Terry, an album full of wish fulfilment, critiqued characters, memorial muscle and historical hustle. The truth is in there, just skating below the surface of their glammy, country-stepping punk/pop odysseys, we only have to listen carefully. Remember Terry is a fitting follow-up to last year’s celebrated debut album. Ideas are pursued and new ground explored. Throughout this expansion of sound and subject-matter though, Terry remain committed to telling it straight, reporting from the frontline of the political made personal. Remember Terry was recorded by Terry at Grace Lane and Terry HQ through the first few months of 2017. Digitised by Nick Kuceli. Mixed and Mastered by Mikey Young.

100000x100000 999

The Myrrors – Hasta La Victoria

Hasta La Victoria comes just one year after Entranced Earth, and serves as its perfect companion piece. And yet, not a moment of the albums thirty-seven minutes ever feels even remotely rushed, or anything short of natural. Indeed, in the best possible way, Hasta La Victoria sounds like The Myrrors couldnt be doing anything else. Perhaps its not the victory in the albums title that focuses the bands attention perhaps its the until. Throughout Hasta La Victoria, the band sounds utterly propelled by an invisible force, by the indelible impression that their actions as a band, as artists, as people have an impact, and that impact should continue until victory. Be here now or be here later, there’s little doubt that The Myrrors will be continuing to walk the path when you get here.

100000x100000 999

Triptides -Afterglow

As the tides of the ocean draw their power from the moon above, the music of Triptides is fueled by the mind-bending inspiration and wide-ranging creative talents of Glenn Brigman (vocals and guitar), Josh Menashe (guitar and vocals), Dylan Sizemore (bass guitar) and Shaugnessy Starr (drums). The trip began in the bohemian basements of Bloomington, Indiana in 2010, where Glenn and Josh shared ideas and influences before evolving to craft a complex yet cohesive range of lush, “psychedelic beach-pop” sounds. Two EPs and four LPs later, Triptides are now an essential element of the Los Angeles psych scene, where they are preparing to launch their newest album, Afterglow. Inspired by the spirit of ’60s and ’70s West Coast pop and psychedelia, as well as legendary albums ranging from The Piper at the Gates of Dawn to The Notorious Byrd Brothers,

Beach House -B-Sides and Rarities

Beach House release the B-Sides and Rarities album, a 14-track compilation of songs from throughout their career so far. The album features two previously unreleased tracks Chariot and Baseball Diamond, which were recorded during the Depression Cherry and Thank Your Lucky Stars sessions, both albums of which were released two months apart in 2015.

LP – Black Vinyl packaged in colour inner and spot varnished deluxe cardstock outer sleeve with digital download code.

The cure acoustic hits black vinyl packshots 2000px

The Cure – Acoustic Hits

First time on vinyl for The Cure’s acoustic rendition of their Greatest Hits. This was a limited edition CD which accompanied the 2001 Greatest Hits compilation and has never appeared on vinyl. The Record Store Day 2017 Release was a Double Picture Disc and now gets re-released on Double 180 Gram Black Vinyl.

Lc5001cd cu

The Rolling Stones – The Complete British Radio Broadcasts 1963 – 1965

Legendary performances on various BBC radio shows from the 1960’s. Digitally remastered for greatly enhanced sound quality. ‘In view of the past increase of interest in rhythm and blues groups in Britain, an exceptionally good future is predicted for us by many people,’ Brian Jones wrote to the BBC in January 1963, requesting an audition. They turned him down, but soon changed their mind. Between that autumn and the summer of 1965, the Stones recorded numerous classic radio sessions for the Beeb, which are presented here together with background notes and images. Containing some of the most vital British R&B ever recorded, the set is an essential purchase for serious Stones fans.

1

The Beach Boys -1967 – Sunshine Tomorrow

1967 – Sunshine Tomorrow  is a unique 2CD collection from The Beach Boys – arguably one of the greatest bands of all-time. Featuring producers Mark Linett and Alan Boyd’s new, first–ever stereo mix of the 1967 Wild Honey album. As well as opening up the legendary band’s vault to debut 54 sought-after rarities from that year, 50 years after they were first put to tape. This collection dives into a fascinating and frenetic chapter in The Beach Boys’ long, groundbreaking creative arc, exploring the band’s dynamic year in the studio and on tour. Previously unreleased highlights include The Beach Boys’ shelved ‘live’ album, Lei’d in Hawaii, studio recordings from the Wild Honey and Smiley Smile album sessions, and live concert recordings from shows in Hawaii, Washington DC and Boston.

Stones - No Filter - Europe 2017

The Rolling Stones will play thirteen shows in twelve different venues, across Europe, in September and October. STONES – NO FILTER sees Mick, Keith, Charlie and Ronnie, back where they belong, out on the road, playing to packed stadiums.

http://www.rollingstones.com/tickets/

9 September Hamburg, Germany Stadtpark
12 September Munich, Germany Olympic Stadium
16 September Spielberg, Austria Spielberg at Red Bull Ring
20 September Zurich, Switzerland Letzigrund Stadium
23 September Lucca, Italy Lucca Summer Festival-City Walls
27 September Barcelona, Spain Olympic Stadium
30 September *Amsterdam, Holland *Amsterdam ArenA
3 October *Copenhagen, Denmark *Parken Stadium
9 October *Dusseldorf, Germany *Esprit arena
12 October *Stockholm, Sweden *Friends Arena
15 October *Arnhem, Holland *GelreDome
19 October *Paris, France *U Arena
22 October *Paris, France *U Arena

This STONES – NO FILTER European tour follows last year’s ground-breaking tour of South America culminating in the historical concert in Havana, Cuba.
As always, the Rolling Stones will treat their European fans to a set list packed full of classics such as, ‘Gimme Shelter’, ‘Paint It Black’, ‘Jumpin’ Jack Flash’, ‘Tumbling Dice’ and ‘Brown Sugar’, but they will also include a couple of unexpected tracks each night, and randomly selected surprises from their formidable arsenal of songs. For all of the European No Filter shows, the Stones will be unveiling a spectacular new production and state of the art stage design.
Keith Richards said, “Hey Guys, here we come. See you there!!!!”
Mick Jagger said, “I’m so excited to be touring Europe this Autumn and returning to some familiar places and some we’ve never done before.”

The tour, produced by Concerts West, kicks off at The Stadtpark in Hamburg on Saturday September 9 and then heads for Munich (Germany), Spielberg (Austria), Zurich (Switzerland), Lucca (Italy) Barcelona (Spain), Amsterdam (Holland), Copenhagen (Denmark), Dusseldorf (Germany), Stockholm (Sweden), Arnhem (Holland) and rounds up with two shows in Paris (France) at the brand new ‘U Arena’, the first concerts to be staged at this venue.

Get Tickets

Eagle Rock Entertainment

The Rolling Stones recent concert movie “Olé Olé Olé! A Trip Across Latin America” is coming to home video. The film, which was shown in Cinema’s and Theatre for one night only back in December will be released on DVD and Blu-ray on May 26th. including Seven bonus tracks, totaling about 50 minutes, added to the movie for this release.

You can see the list of bonus performances below.

Olé Olé Olé! A Trip Across Latin America documents the Rolling Stones’ 2016 tour of 10 Latin America cities. Along the way, they played their first ever show in Cuba, a free concert that made history last March.

The original press release for the movie stated that it  “combines electrifying live performances from across the tour and from their historic tour finale as the first-ever rock band to perform to an audience of 1.2 million in Havana, with an intimate insight into the world of the Rolling Stones.”

The Rolling Stones played their usual hits throughout the tour, and the movie showcases many of them in full. It also includes interviews with the tour’s promoter, production manager and band members.

The Rolling Stones, ‘Olé Olé Olé! A Trip Across Latin America’ Bonus Performances
“Out of Control” (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
“Paint It Black” (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
“Honky Tonk Women” (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
“Sympathy for the Devil” (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
“You Got the Silver” (Lima, Peru)
“Midnight Rambler” (Lima, Peru)
“Miss You” (Lima, Peru)