Posts Tagged ‘The Rolling Stones’

Originally released in 1975, Metamorphosis was first official rarities compilation under The Rolling Stones’ name. You’ll hear outtakes, demos, and other rarities from The Stones’ early days, featuring session legends like Big Jim Sullivan, Clem Cattini, and one Jimmy Page.

Side two, meanwhile, includes session material from Beggars Banquet and Let It Bleed. Though the result may have been a bit piecemeal, Metamorphosis presets a compelling collection of intriguing rarities and critical session material. Now, the compilation arrives on hunter green vinyl with a special iron-on of the album artwork. After the release of Hot Rocks 1964–1971 in 1971, an album titled “Necrophilia” was compiled for release as the follow-up, with the aid of Andrew Loog Oldham, featuring many previously unreleased (or, more accurately, discarded) outtakes from the Rolling Stones’ Decca/London period. While that project failed to materialise—with More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies) being released in its place—most of the unreleased songs were held over for a future project. In 1974, to give it an air of authority, Bill Wyman involved himself in compiling an album he entitled Black Box. However, Allen Klein wanted more Mick Jagger/Keith Richards songs in the project for monetary reasons, and Wyman’s version remained unreleased.

Metamorphosis was issued in its place. Most tracks that appear on side one of the vinyl album are outtakes, written by Jagger and Richards for other artists to perform. They were mostly recorded with session musicians like Big Jim Sullivan on guitar, Clem Cattini on drums, and Jimmy Page on guitar, and were not intended for release by the Rolling Stones. Indeed, on most of these tracks the only Rolling Stones member who appears is Jagger. While “Out of Time” and “Heart of Stone” were already well known, they appear here in drastically different renditions, with session players providing the backing.

Side two includes unreleased band recordings created up until the Sticky Fingers sessions of 1970. Some people found that the song “I’d Much Rather Be With the Boys” had a homosexual subtext, so The Toggery Five version changed the lyric to “I’d rather be out with the boys.” Released in June 1975, Metamorphosis came out the same day as the band’s authorised hits collection Made in the Shade and was also seen to be cashing in on The Rolling Stones’ summer Tour of the Americas. While the critical reception was lukewarm—many felt some of the songs were best left unreleased— Metamorphosis still managed to reach No. 8 in the US, though it only made No. 45 in the UK. Two singles, “Out of Time” (featuring Jagger singing over the same backing track used for Chris Farlowe’s 1966 version) and a cover of Stevie Wonder’s “I Don’t Know Why” briefly made the singles charts.

Upon its initial release, Metamorphosis was released with 16 songs in the UK, while the American edition had only 14—omitting tracks “Some Things Just Stick in Your Mind” and “We’re Wastin’ Time”. The album’s cover art alludes to Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis.

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The War On Drugs have remixed The Rolling Stones’ recently unearthed 1974 Jimmy Page collaboration “Scarlet,”. The track is a previously unreleased 1974 track featuring Jimmy Page that will feature on the upcoming deluxe reissue of Goats Head Soup.

Says The War On Drugs’ Adam Granduciel: “I just re-imagined the song as if I had Mick, Keith and Jimmy in the room with me. After messing with my Linn Drum for a bit, the song fell into this double time thing and I just went with it. I called my friend and bandmate, Dave Hartley, to fill out the bass on the new groove. Then I figured if I had Jimmy Page in the room I’d probably ask him to plug into my favourite rack flanger so that’s what I did. My friend Anthony LaMarca added some last minute percussion. I’m so honoured to have gotten to work on this especially since ‘Angie’ was probably the first ‘rock’ song that I asked to be played on repeat when I was really young. Hope you enjoy it!”

Welcome to Goats Head Soup 2020 — coming September 4th & featuring unheard tracks, demos, outtakes, live performances & more. You can listen to one of three unheard tracks – and pre-order the album across multiple formats, including expansive 4LP & 4CD boxsets. This classic album has been restored to its full glory with a new stereo album mix, sourced from the original session files:

Buy Online The Rolling Stones - NME Poll Winners 1965 EP

In 1965 The Rolling Stones picked up NME awards for Best New Group, Best British R’n’B Group and Best New Disc Or TV Singer. They celebrated with a gig at the Wembley Empire Pool where their live prowess could clearly be heard, despite the screams of 10,000 highly-energized fans. “Everybody Needs Somebody To Love” was performed at a slower pace than usual and formed a medley with “Pain In My Heart. Around and Around” featured a pair of densely interwoven guitars whilst “The Last Time” benefited from distinctive Keith Richards  on backing vocals.

Tracklisting:
SIDE ONE
1 Everybody Needs Somebody To Love
2 Pain In My Heart
SIDE TWO
1 Around And Around
2 The Last Time

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The Rolling Stones have released a video for “Scarlet,” the recently unearthed song they recorded in 1974 with Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page on guitar. Normal People actor Paul Mescal stars in the video, which was “filmed with a socially distanced shoot” at Claridge’s hotel in London.

“Scarlet” is one of three previously unreleased songs on the upcoming deluxe edition of “Goats Head Soup”, which comes out on September 4th. The set also contains a remastered edition of the 1973 album, demos, outtakes and alternate mixes from the era — plus a complete show from the Goats Head Soup tour recorded in Brussels, Belgium, on October 17th, 1973. That gig was originally released in 2011 under the title “Brussels Affair”.

The Stones recorded “Scarlet” with Jimmy Page and Traffic bassist Ric Grech in October 1974. “My recollection is we walked in at the end of a Zeppelin session,” Richards said in a statement earlier this year. “They were just leaving, and we were booked in next and I believe that Jimmy decided to stay. We weren’t actually cutting it as a track; it was basically for a demo, a demonstration, you know, just to get the feel of it, but it came out well, with a line-up like that, you know, we better use it.‘”

Prior to the pandemic, the Stones planned on playing North American stadiums this summer as part of their ongoing No Filter tour. Those shows have since been delayed indefinitely. During the downtime, the Stones performed a virtual rendition of “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” at the One World – Together at Home fundraising event. They also released “Living in a Ghost Town,” their first original song since 2012.

 

The Rolling Stones have unveiled plans to drop a previously unreleased concert film, “Steel Wheels Live”. The film documents the band’s 1989 show in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Having not hit the road for most of the 80s, The Steel Wheels Tour was an astounding return for the Rolling Stones, not least as it was the longest tour they had by that point undertaken. It was also to be their last with Bill Wyman. “Steel Wheels Live” was recorded towards the end of the band’s 60-date run through the stadiums of North America, in the second half of 1989.

The Steel Wheels Tour (later rebranded the Urban Jungle Tour) kicked off in August 1989 was in support of the band’s 19th studio album (in the UK) which was released the same month. It lasted a whole year and the North American leg finished at the Convention Centre in Atlantic City, New Jersey in December 1989.

The gate-busting ticket sales were one thing, but the stage and lighting design of The Steel Wheels Tour set the pace for superstar tours as we know them today. Special guest appearances from Axl Rose, Izzy Stradlin, Eric Clapton and John Lee Hooker on this Atlantic City date make this an even more extraordinary document of the band’s return to touring. Guns N’ Roses’ Axl Rose and Izzy Stradlin, who joined the stalwart rockers on stage for a performance of ‘Salt Of the Earth’. Eric Clapton popped up for a performance of ‘Little Red Roster’, who was then joined by blues icon John Lee Hooker on ‘Boogie Chillen’.

This evening bore witness to The Rolling Stones infamous backstage run-in with president Donald Trump. So it goes, The Stones’ tour producer Michael Cohl found a way to earn the band more money by staging the concert as a pay-per-view event, like UFC but with riffs.

In order to pull the feat off, Cohl needed to find a promoter who was willing to front the cost for the band to play. That promoter ended up being no other than Donald Trump.

The band were initially reluctant to be involved with Trump in any capacity. To help sweeten the deal, Cohl wrote up a contract that barred Trump from promoting the concert in one of his press conferences, and attending the concert.

The Stones had such power in those days that the 6:40 p.m. slot on the national evening news was going to be an interview with the Stones to talk about and promote the pay-per-view,” Cohl explained in an interview . “At about 5:50 p.m. I get word that I have to come to the press room in the next building. I run to the press room in the next building and what do you think is happening? There’s Donald Trump giving a press conference, in our room!. “I give him the [come here gesture]. ‘Come on, Donald, what are you doing? A) You promised us you wouldn’t even be here and, B) you promised you would never do this.’ He says, ‘But they begged me to go up, Michael! They begged me to go up!’ I say, ‘Stop it. Stop it. This could be crazy. Do what you said you would. Don’t make a liar of yourself.’”

Unfortunately for Trump, Cohl had left his walkie-talkie in the dressing room, and The Rolling Stones overheard the altercation between the two. Keith Richards, in his infinite, unhinged glory, simply had enough, and subsequently pulled a knife on Trump.

“They call me back [into the dressing room],” Cohl explained. “At which point Keith pulls out his knife and slams it on the table and says, ‘What the hell do I have you for? Do I have to go over there and fire him myself? One of us is leaving the building – either him, or us.’ I said, ‘No. I’ll go do it. Don’t you worry.’”

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Another new old song from the upcoming reissue of Goats Head Soup. This one features Jimmy Page and was probably named after his daughter. It has a very cool groove to it.

The Stones’ Keith Richards has his own recollections on how “Scarlet” took shape and how “we walked in at the end of a Zeppelin session. They were just leaving, and we were booked in next and I believe that Jimmy decided to stay.”

 

“Scarlet” was a freak accident. “We weren’t actually cutting it as a track,” enthuses Richards in a statement, “it was basically for a demo, a demonstration, you know, just to get the feel of it, but it came out well, with a line up like that, you know, we better use it.‘’. Goats Head Soup 2020 — coming September 4th & featuring unheard tracks, demos, outtakes, live performances & more. You can listen to ‘Criss Cross’  and now today the track “Scarlet” one of three unheard tracks – and pre-order the album across multiple formats, including expansive 4LP & 4CD boxsets. This classic album has been restored to its full glory with a new stereo album mix, sourced from the original session files:

Originally recorded in October 1974, this track has never been released before – featuring legendary Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and guests Blind Faith’s Rick Grech on bass. “I remember first jamming this with Jimmy and Keith in Ronnie’s basement studio. It was a great session.” – Mick Jagger

One of three unheard tracks featured on Goats Head Soup 2020, sitting alongside an all-new stereo mix of the original 1973 album, plus demos, outtakes, live performances & more. Goats Head Soup 2020, out September 4th! Another prized jewel in the Rolling Stones‘ unmatched catalogue is restored to its full glory. Features the new stereo album mix, sourced from the original session files.

 

The Rolling Stones: Goats Head Soup 2020 – Half Speed Master 180g Vinyl + Bonus Etched 7”

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Last week, the Rolling Stones announced plans for a super-deluxe edition of their 1973 LP Goats Head Soup. It features a remastered version of the original album along with alternate mixes, rarities, instrumental tracks, a complete 1973 show taped in Brussels, and three previously unreleased songs from the era.

The original Goats Head Soup tour was confined entirely to Europe and lasted just seven weeks. Four songs from the album (“Coming Down Again,” “Hide Your Love,” ‘Winter,” and “Can You Hear the Music”) were never played at any point, while “100 Years Ago” and “Silver Train” were dropped after just one week into the run. By the time the tour wrapped, the only Goats Head Soup songs still in rotation were “Angie,” “Star Star,” ‘Dancing With Mr. D,” and “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker).”

As the years went on, only “Angie,” “Star Star,” and “Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo” stayed in their live repertoire. It wasn’t until 2014 that they decided to resurrect some of the lesser-known tunes. Here’s video of “Silver Train” from a November 18th, 2014, show at the Brisbane Entertainment Centre in Brisbane, Australia. They’re joined by Mick Taylor, who plays on the original. As you can hear, the song is about a man’s encounter with a prostitute. “And I did not know her name,” Jagger sings. “But I sure love the way/That she laughed and took my money.” They haven’t done the song since that night, but in 2017 they brought back “Dancing With Mr. D” and played it at five shows. We’re still waiting to hear “Coming Down Again,” “Hide Your Love,” ‘Winter,” and “Can You Hear the Music.

Another prized jewel gets a special release in the Rolling Stones‘ unmatched catalogue, restored to its full glory and more, multi-format release of their 1973 classic Goats Head Soup”. The album will be available in multiple configurations, including four-disc cd and vinyl box set editions, with a treasure trove of unreleased studio and live material. The reissue follows the huge success and acclaim for the Stones latest track “Living In a Ghost Town” single and their universally-admired recent lockdown performance of “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” in a global citizen’s april special One World: Together at Home.

The box set and deluxe cd and vinyl editions of “Goats Head Soup” will all feature ten bonus tracks, which include alternate versions, outtakes and no fewer than three previously unheard tracks. the first of these to be unveiled, “Criss Cross”, Stones devotees worldwide will be thrilled by the inclusion, on the box set and deluxe editions, of the previously unheard “Scarlet”, featuring guitar by Jimmy Page, and a third newly unveiled song, “All The Rage”. The layered guitar textures of “scarlet” make for a track that’s as infectious and raunchy as anything the band cut in this hallowed era. as well as jimmy Page guesting alongside Mick & Keith on the track it also features on bass Rick Grech of Blind Faith fame.

“all the rage” has a wild, post – “brown sugar” strut and the percussive “criss cross” rocks and swaggers as only the stones can. the bonus disc of unreleased material also sheds new light on tracks such as “100 years ago” and “hide your love”, with further unissued mixes by stones insider and acclaimed producer glyn johns.

Box set editions of Goats Head Soup will also include the infamous Brussels Affair, the 15-track live album recorded in a memorable show in Belgium, on the autumn 1973 tour that followed the album’s late august release. this much-sought-after disc, mixed by Bob Clearmountain, was previously available only in the Rolling Stones’ “Official Bootleg” series of live recordings in 2012.

The Brussels show features the already-classic “Tumbling Dice”, “Midnight Rambler”, “Jumping Jack Flash” and many others, and includes a sequence of tracks from the then-new album. “Star Star” is followed by “Dancing With Mr. D”, “Doo doo doo doo doo (Heartbreaker)” and “Angie”. Additionally, the cd and vinyl box sets offer the original ten-track album in 5.1 surround sound, dolby atmos and hi-res mixes, along with the videos for “Dancing with Mr. D”, “Silver Train” and “Angie”. an exclusive 100-page book will feature a remarkable array of photographs, essays by writers Ian Mccann, Nick Kent and Daryl Easlea and faithful reproductions of three tour posters from 1973.

As Mccann writes: “Goats Head Soup” was released with plenty of fanfare. despite what you may read today, the kids weren’t entirely absorbed by glam rock, metal, prog and philly soul back in 1973, and they bought the album in their thousands, sending it to no. 1 in the USA and in the Uk, their fifth consecutive british chart-topper.”

It was The Rolling Stones 11th studio album, recorded in Jamaica, Los Angeles and London as their last collaboration with producer Jimmy Miller, Goats Head Soup came in the wake of the Stones’ landmark 1972 double album Exile On Main St. the new set was introduced by the single that became one of their most exalted ballads, the endlessly elegant single “Angie”, completed by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards during a song-writing sojourn in Switzerland. The timeless love song, showcasing Jagger’s yearning lead vocal and Nicky Hopkins‘ beautiful piano motif, topped the charts in the us, where it was certified platinum, and went to no. 1 across europe, australia and beyond. “we decided to do something different, and it worked,” said Richards of “Angie”. “maybe a lot of people bought it that would never buy a Stones album.” interestingly in a recent interview with the New York Times, Bob Dylan chose “Angie” as one of three Rolling Stones songs he wished he had written.

Goats Head Soup, with its famous photographer David Bailey shot sleeve, featured the Rolling Stones’ vintage 1969-1974 line-up of Jagger, Richards, Mick Taylor, Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts, with the addition of some essential collaborators. on an album on which their trademark rocking sound was often augmented by more low-key, reflective material, there were no fewer than four featured keyboard players: Hopkins, Billy Preston, Ian ‘Stu’ Stewart and Jagger himself.

“Angie” was the only single to be released from the lp in the uk, where it spent two weeks at no. 5 in September. in the us, the exhilaratingly funky, horn-filled “Doo doo doo doo doo (Heartbreaker)”, featuring Mick Taylor’s wah-wah lead guitar, followed it into the top 20 in february 1974.

Many other highlights of the album included the majestically brooding opener “Dancing with Mr. D”, the lithely strutting “100 Years Ago” and “Star Star” and the graceful “Winter”. Richards’ rueful lead vocal on “Coming Down Again” featured another Stones stalwart, saxophonist Bobby Keys. “Silver Train”, the b-side of “Angie”, would be revived after a gap of some 40 years, during the Rolling Stones’ 14 On Fire tour of 2014, when Mick Taylor reprised his original guitar part in shows in Tokyo and Brisbane.

When the album was first released, reviewers lined up to sing its praises. “this is music which could only come from good musicians who know each other really well,” ruled the late and esteemed writer-broadcaster Charlie Gillett in let it rock. “the Stones succeed because they rarely forget their purpose — the creation of rock & roll drama,” said Bud Scoppa in Rolling Stone magazine. “it’s deepening and unfolding over the coming months will no doubt rate as one of the year’s richest musical experiences.”

The 4 Lp Set Deluxe clothbound expected release: 4th September 2020

Live At The Oakland Coliseum 1969 (2020 reissue)

This LP contains soundboard recordings of the Rolling Stones’ live performance at the Oakland Colisuem in Oakland, California at the start of their ground breaking November 1969 trek across North America.

Subsequently broadcast on Radio KSAN at the behest of Bill Graham, these nine tracks demonstrate why on this tour the Stones were introduced as “the greatest rock’n’roll band in the world.” Four of these songs – Prodigal Son, You Gotta Move, Gimme Shelter and Satisfaction – were not included on the Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! LP, recorded later on the tour in New York and Baltimore.

These LP is made by the person who operated the label which later calls the TMOQ. Ken and Dub are two people who have felt quite recognized among maniacs in the 2010s. It was that they released Bob Dylan’s “GREAT WHITE WONDER” famous for their first bootleg in the history of rock. This sound source boasts a different quality as the audience of 1969. Dub succeeded in capturing the performance on by using the shotgun microphone instead of the surrounding sound.

It is well known that it became the opportunity to release anecdotes about the album and official release ‘Get Yer Ya – Ya’s Out’. What is surprising than anything is that the value of the item and the sound source did not fade at all even after the appearance of the official. On the contrary, the sound source that Dub recorded, even in recent years, has been released in various forms. It is a testimony of how excellent it was that recording. This recording is referred to as Dub recording below.

What makes these parts mix SBD and succeeded in raising the balance of Mick’s vocal which was a distant subject in various audience recordings because of quiet performance. That surprisingly natural finish is another masterpiece. He showed outstanding sense, such as diverting SBD even in “Live With Me”. A masterpiece of audience recording comes out this week from the 1969 American tour, which pairs well with the soundboard masterpiece “GET YER YA – YA’S OUT! COMPLETE EDITION”!

 

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The Rolling Stones have released a new song. It’s titled “Living in a Ghost Town” and it marks the first single from the band since the release of the covers record Blue & Lonesome way back in 2016. In a press release, Mick Jagger said the band began working on the single before the coronavirus spread rapidly across the globe. “We thought would resonate through the times that we’re living in right now,” he said. Have a listen to this classic Stones track “Living in a Ghost Town,” which was completed in isolation.

The mid-tempo number written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards finds the veteran rock band grappling with an isolation that hits all too close to home amid the ongoing global coronavirus pandemic. “I’m a ghost, livin’ in a ghost town/ You can look for me, but I can’t be found/ You can search for me, I had to go underground/ Life was so beautiful, then we all got locked down/ Feel like a ghost, livin’ in a ghost town,” Jagger sneers over a steady drumbeat and electric guitar line and the haunting harmonica sound.

“So the Stones were in the studio recording some new material before the lockdown and there was one song we thought would resonate through the times that we’re living in right now,” the frontman said in a statement about the song’s prescient timing. “We’ve worked on it in isolation. And here it is — it’s called ‘Living in Ghost Town.’” the surprise track marks The Rolling Stones’ first proper studio single since their 2016 cover album, which featured takes on blues classics such as Buddy Johnson and His Orchestra’s 1953 hit “Just Your Fool,” Little Walter’s “Hate to See You Go,” Bukka White’s “Shake ‘Em On Down” and more.

Prior to the coronavirus outbreak, the Stones were scheduled to tour North America this summer. They recently gave a remote performance of “You Can’t Always Get What You Want” during the One World: Together at Home broadcast.

The official video for Living In A Ghost Town by The Rolling Stones