Posts Tagged ‘Nashville’

Jack White and Brendan Benson’s group The Raconteurs are hitting the road for the first time in years, and are dropping their first album in over a decade “Help Us Stranger” this coming June. The Grammy-winning Nashville based powerhouse teased fans in December with two tracks from the record, and have now they have unveiled a third cut ‘Hey Gyp (Dig The Slowness)‘, a punchy reimagining of Scottish psychedelic folk singer Donovan‘s 1965 song. The Raconteurs‘ rendition inserts a heavy dose of garage punk heft into the tune, while retaining the stripped back original’s lusty soul. enjoy their cover of ‘Hey Gyp (Dig The Slowness)’ version below…

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released April 10th, 2019
2019, 2019 Third Man Records, LLC

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Arlie are a new young band from Nashville , Knowingly naïve, romantic indie-pop underpinned by hip-hop-influenced percussion with a touch of MGMT about them, Weird production sound effects and obscure, ethereal vocals meet with massive pop choruses, resulting in deceptively ambitious songs that are DIY in attitude but future chart fodder in effect. You’re going to love them, The trio are local heroes at US college Vanterbilt, where they’re studying, yet their tracks ‘Didya Think’ and ‘Big Fat Mouth’ have racked up millions of streams on Spotify, and they’ve since landed a deal with Atlantic Records. They’re in the very strange position of being a local band with a global fanbase – and it’s always fun to get onboard with an act on the ground and watch them grow.

Band Members
Nathaniel Banks,
Adam Lochemes,
Carson Lystad,

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Roanoke is a folk/americana duo fronted band that uses rich harmonies, heartfelt lyrics, and roots music to create a captivating and unique sound. An exceptionally talented young quintet, Roanoke belie any geographic references implied by their name because they make their home in Nashville. That misnomer aside, the music they offer on their stunning sophomore effort, “Where I Roam”, reflects a clarity and cohesion that suggest that even early on in their collective career, the band possesses a knowing sense of skill and savvy. Seamless harmonies and the back porch setting suggested by mandolin, banjo and violin assure a seductive sound, a delivery that lures its listeners even on first encounter. Within the span of its five tracks.

Roanoke weaves a series of tender tales and nuanced narratives, all spawned from a decidedly heart-worn perspective. “Jordan,” “The Light” and “Without You” provide an uptick in energy, while the beautiful ballads “Losing You” and “Heavy Goodbyes” effectively ensure the emotional embrace. The couple at the helm, Joey Beesley and Taylor Dupuis, effectively mine this appealing presentation to full advantage, allowing Where I Roam to transport its listeners to destinations where the auditory appeal is undeniable.

Tennessee Stone explores the dynamic of two people experiencing the highs and lows of love. It’s about feeling lost and wanting to escape and runaway, but also realizing its very easy to lose your way while searching for the unknown. In those moments you think about the memories and emotions that once were, which leads to a yearning for the comfort of your home in another being.

“The infectious rhythm and mood carry through in the video, which takes an equally spirited look at the intricacies of relationships….Hauntingly shot at a small country farm, the video cuts between slow-motion shots, artsy interludes, and intimate moments of reflection, effectively evoking a feeling of absence.”.

“Swirling guitars and harmonica, plucky mandolin, and driving percussion dust the landscape of Roanoke’s adventuresome sound….Fans of the band will feel right at home with its soaring choruses, full-bodied roots instrumentation, and razor-sharp overall delivery. Newcomers to their sound will be captivated by the simultaneous tenderness and energy of the breezy, earthen roots tune.”
Band Members
Taylor Dupuis,
Joey Beesley,
Zach Nowak,
Kyle Breese,
John Fiorentino,

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When singer and guitarist Jenna Moynihan saw the phrase “Daddy Issues” scribbled on the bathroom wall of a now-defunct Nashville DIY venue, she mistakenly assumed it was the name of an all-girl punk outfit sure to become her next favorite band. Upon realizing that no such band existed, Moynihan and friends Emily Maxwell (drums) and Jenna Mitchell (bass) picked up their instruments, taught themselves how to play and started their own band. Three years later, Daddy Issues  release their full-length vinyl debut Deep Dream, out via Infinity Cat Recordings.

Daddy Issues writes self-aware grunge pop about friendship, lost love and life as an urban twenty-something. They openly discuss complex issues like bodily integrity but graft in bits of snark and charm to the otherwise arresting topic. This empowering viewpoint coupled with aggressive distortion and bubbly melodies gives the trio a distinct dynamism. Recorded on November 15th, 2018 in Chicago, IL.

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Love and hate plus chorus and distortion (aka the “Nirvana guitar tone”) are the defining features of Nashville duo Sad Baxter’s grunge-inflected So Happy EP. Though only 6 songs long, the EP packs a mighty emotional punch thanks to the simmering anger coursing through Deezy Violet’s smart, literate songs. From twisty opener “Love Yew” through fist-pumping highlight “Believe Me,” (with backing vocals from drummer Alex Mojaverian) wherein Violet laments the inability to love a damaged individual in the interests of self-protection, these songs are as catchy as they are scabby, balanced perfectly between both the darkest and lightest of human impulses. It helps that Violet is never anything but real, both with herself and her subject matter. On “Sick Outt,” she excoriates an abuser from her past (“You know what you’ve done to me/I don’t deserve a single memory”), but she’s not immune to finding comfort in life’s sweetest moments. So Happy is true to its title, and final track “Baby” closes out with a sentiment as congenial as the guitars are raw: “I don’t wanna think about anything at all too hard/I just wanna go and lay in my baby’s arms.”

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Sad Baxter is Deezy Violet and Alex Mojaverian
All songs written and performed by Sad Baxter

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If kaleidoscopic psych that blends florid Tropicália with hypnotic drones, churning motorik and gritty garage gives you any kind of thrill, you owe it to your neurotransmitters to roll up for The Psychics. Their last EP 4×3 will work your frontal lobes, too, as its catchy and delightfully disorienting tunes offer insightful looks at everything from drug experiences to the role of art in society. It’s also the first release from the slimmed-down version of the band that relocated to Music City from Bloomington, Ind., last year, trimming down their name in the process — though they are no longer “Jerome and the Psychics,” the enigmatic Jerome X remains the frontman.

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Released August 10th, 2018

Many thanks to Blockhouse Bloomington, Andy Beargie, and David James. We could not have made this without their hard work and many graces.

The Psychics are:
Jerome X – Guitar/Vox/Songwriter
Nick Harley – Guitar/Vox/Songwriter
Jay Smith – Bass Guitar/Keys
Kate Haldrup – Drums

Produced by Jay Smith & The Psychics

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Ron Gallo is delightfully hard to figure out. He takes the free-spirited, anti-capitalist ethos of 60s rock and mixes it with what the Black Keys think they sound like ,His lyrics are incessantly entertaining, making it almost OK that he named his debut LP HEAVY META. On album opener “Young Lady, You’re Scaring Me,” Gallo sings, “Let’s get a house, you and me and your 12 cats.” His delivery is sneeringly reminiscent of Dylan, singing such lines with a sincerity and confidence, as if the listener is crazy for smirking at this shack with a dozen cats. He should scan as annoying, but there’s something deliriously charming about this fractured soul spelling out the ills of humanity one song at a time.

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The Philly born, now Nashville-based songwriter first emerged with the modern Americana/folk band, Toy Soldiers, before leaving Pennsylvania for the warm grasp of country music’s capitol, introducing the city to a defiantly unsatisfied debutante, eager to take you out to lunch and then spit in your face because your politics are wack. Gallo has this innate ability—a tremendously tricky skill to hone to dose his songs with humour, all the while lacing them with scathing social commentaries and a level of depth most garage rock acts never reach, let alone aim for. On Heavy Meta, Gallo proved that he’s just a wiser and sharper songwriter than most people doing it. That trend continues on “It’s All Gonna Be OK,” the first single from Gallo’s forthcoming LP, Stardust Birthday Party, out October 5th via New West.

“It’s All Gonna Be OK,” is nervous and twitchy, hallucinatory and repetitive with its scratchy and fidgeting guitar parts, until Gallo, sensing the growing unease, sings, “It’s all gonna be OK.” Good to know. Gallo rattles off all of the shit tearing us apart before easing us with his oddly placating aphorism. Gallo’s philosophy comes as a sort of self-medication, as he tries to convince himself that this broken world can get better, Gallo works his way through insecurities and finds this blind faith to be comforting. He tells us:

it’s all gonna be OK, no matter what it is, because all feeling, thought and experience is temporary. could be in one second or 20 years but, to trust that it’s all going exactly as it should, is true and liberating. i like to remind myself of this often and figured might as well share this thought with others via a mostly one chord song featuring my trumpet debut heard in the outro of the song. it’s all gonna be OK is the main message, and “stardust birthday party” is me explaining WHY? from my own experience looking inside.

Introducing...Lilly Hiatt & The Dropped Ponies.

It took Lilly Hiatt quite sometime to come to terms with her Nashville status. After her initial flee, she came to embrace the fact that home truly is where the heart is, and eventually returned to Tennesssee. Hiatt enjoyed some successes as a solo artist, including a shared stage with Emmylous Harris and Jim Lauderdale, as well as a guest appearance on the Craig Ferguson show. Upon her introduction to North Carolina guitarist, Beth Finney, a new beast began to form. Hiatt’s aching melodies combined with Finney’s tender yet turbulent guitar licks yielded a sound that the two were unable to find prior: women shedding their childhood skin and coming into the unraveled and emotional world of adulthood. Soon after, the girls hooked up with drummer John Radford (Charles Walker and the Dynamites, Drew Holcombe Band) and bass player Jake Bradley (Over the Rhine). The Pony Stampede had began. Since then, The Dropped Ponies have graced the stage of the Ryman, opened for Lyle Lovett, and enjoyed success over seas. They currently reside in Nashville, TN and are working on their debut album, “Let Down”. Produced by Doug Lancio (Patty Griffin, Gretchen Peters), the album is to be released in September.

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FRANCES CONE is Christina Cone, Andrew Doherty, Adam Melchor, and Aaron Hamel. The Nashville based indie-pop band, fronted by Christina Cone, is named after Christina’s father and great-grandfather, both musicians themselves in South Carolina and both born on September 11th. The band has been praised for their compelling, emotional live show and captivating recordings. In 2016, Frances Cone released, “Arizona,” the first single from their forthcoming full-length album, Late Riser, which is set to release in 2018. Stereogum praised “Arizona” for “Cone’s melodic vocals, rich harmonies, and an electrifying guitar sound.” Written about her brother, filmmaker Stephen Cone, “Arizona’s” .

The band’s second single, “Leave Without You,” was released in March 2017, is an emotional song about the band’s decision to leave Brooklyn. Cone says, “it is the only place I’ve known as an adult person, and (the song is about) what and who I’ll carry with me.” Billboard raved that the track “employs the band’s signature slow build before exploding with synth and drums into the song’s chorus.”

“Arizona” is the first track off Frances Cone’s new album, “Late Riser” due summer 2018.

Band Members
Christina Cone,
Andrew Doherty,
Adam Melchor,
Aaron Hamel,

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Indie folk singer-songwriter from small town Montana. Based in Nashville, TNIra Wolf’s music and writing is filled with “..original and accessible lyrics without a hint of cliches.” With two studio albums to share, Ira has performed on stages across the US, the UK, Scandinavia, and Southeast Asia since she began touring in 2014. She draws from personal experience, and connects on an intimate level with her audience through her honest lyrics and melancholy vocals. With roots in folk, americana and bluegrass genres, Ira has found a unique sound that resonates with an eclectic listening crowd.

A former Berklee College of Music student, Ira has been recognized for her lyrical content and vocal capabilities in numerous festivals and songwriting contests including Rocky Mountain Folks Festival Songwriter Showcase,   

Along with her talent, Ira has received recognition for her fearless dedication to a full-time touring schedule as a soloist. As she has continued living on the road throughout the past two years, her music and lifestyle have been featured in blogs such as She-Explores ‘Women on the Road’, as well as Sonicbids ‘Success Stories’.

Although Ira Wolf continues to make Nashville her home-base, she maintains a life on the road, both inside the states and overseas.