Posts Tagged ‘Cover’

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Twenty years after the Beastie Boys first said “Hello Nasty” to the world, D.A. Stern and Jacuzzi Boys are teaming up to celebrate its birthday in the form of a split 7” of covers brought to you by Slumberland Records. Focusing on two fan-favorite deep cuts, the three JBs and one D.A. chose songs that showcase the Beasties’ unique versatility while offering messages of mindfulness, emblematic of their later career.

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“Song For the Man,” a Horovitz-penned feminist anthem originally steeped in Sixties psychedelia now sees a garage treatment that only Jacuzzi Boys could deliver while “I Don’t Know,” once an Adam Yauch bossa nova standout, gets the D.A. Stern treatment replete with jangly guitars and sun-drenched backing vocals supplied by Felicia Douglass (Dirty Projectors, Ava Luna). The Beasties were about a lot more than just fighting for your right to party, and this great single is a fitting tribute to their depth in miniature form.

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Released by: Slumberland Records Release date:3 August 2018

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Phoebe Bridgers gave indie rock a shot in the arm last year with the wonderful “Stranger In The Alps”, the Los Angeles musician’s debut album – she became one of our favorite artists of 2017, and her song “Funeral” was among our most played tracks of the year’s roundup. Today, she’s back with a beautiful cover of “The Gold” by Manchester Orchestra, and contrary to the title, the Elliott Smith-harkening song is about a relationship that’s lost its lustre

Phoebe’s cover of Manchester Orchestra‘s “The Gold,” the excellent single from last year’s A Black Mile to the Surface. Phoebe doesn’t change the song up too drastically, but she performs it in that same intimate, instantly-gripping way that she performs her own music, and really makes the song sound like one of her own (as she has done with other covers, like the Mark Kozelek song she did for her great 2017 album Stranger in the Alps.

Manchester Orchestra“The Gold (Phoebe Bridgers Version),” out now on Dead Oceans Records.

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Florence and the Machine pay tribute to Fleetwood Mac, a crucial influence for her with a stripped-down cover of “Silver Springs” that was recorded during a special radio session for The Spectrum at the SiriusXM Studios.

Singer Florence Welch commands the track with her fluttering vibrato, occasionally adopting a light twang as she channels Stevie Nicks. The arrangement opens with subtle piano and acoustic guitar, building with layered backing vocals and a faint tambourine.

Welch spoke about Nicks as a creative inspiration “I’m pretty obsessed with Stevie Nicks, from her style to her voice,” she said. “I like watching her on YouTube and her old performances, the way she moves and everything.”

Florence Welch is in a totally new headspace for new album High as Hope, the follow up to Florence + The Machine‘s chart-topping How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful.

During the SiriusXM session, Florence and the Machine also performed three original tracks: 2009’s “Cosmic Love” and recent singles “Hunger” and “Sky Full of Song,” both from the band’s fourth studio album, High as Hope. 

Speaking to Jenny Eliscu ahead of her exclusive SiriusXM performance, Welch acknowledged that her life and the way she views the world has changed since her last record. This led to her single Hunger becoming a celebratory song about the human condition rather than something dark and dramatic. Along the way, she also learned that freedom can come from being disciplined and isn’t just a “let loose, smash everything to bits kind of thing.”

Florence + The Machine performs “Hunger” at SiriusXM Studios in New York City.

Elsewhere in the interview, she discussed the origins of the album title High as Hope, saying that it came out of a poem she wrote about New York, and she also clarified why her recent breakup wasn’t a focal point of the album.

“I didn’t feel like people needed to hear that any more, and I think, at that point, there were bigger heartbreaks going on than my own heartbreak,” she told Eliscu. “It somehow didn’t feel like that interesting to me. And maybe ‘How Big, How Blue’ had covered every nook and cranny of heartbreak that you possibly could. And also, I guess, in the journey that I had in the last couple of years, I understood that it wasn’t really about the other person, you know?”

Florence and the Machine, opened for the Rolling Stones in April,

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On June 29th, archival record label Numero Group, releases ‘Electrophia‘, a compilation of songs, recorded in the mid-80′s and remastered from the original tapes, by American dream pop artist Happy Rhodes. To mark the occasion, American singer/songwriter Marissa Nadler, has shared a cover of one of those songs. It’s called ‘Where Do I Go’ . Since releasing Strangers in 2016, Marissa Nadler has contributed her spectral stylings to a number of different projects.

Based in upstate New York, Rhodes was known for her four-octave range and her meld of classical influences with synths and acoustic guitar. Nadler’s own interpretation of Rhodes’ 1986 track uses a sultry guitar in place of an electronic organ and synth. Her voice commands a softer, hypnotic force. Listen to “Where Do I Go” below.

 

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For your listening pleasure, a new patreon-fueled cover track. me, Zoe Keating, Sean ono Lennon and John Cameron Mitchell got together and covered Joni Mitchell’s “Big Yellow Taxi”, sad folk-goth-style. this link will take you to my (public) patron post about the song here is the story behind it,

This not-quite-as-jolly-as-Joni cover was recorded live at Pioneer Works in Brooklyn, new york while rehearsing for a one-night only super-group performance for Maria “Brain Pickings” Popova’s annual poetry + science event “The Universe In Verse”. (brainpickings.org).

100% of these digital sales will go to the same charity that “The Universe In Verse” worked to benefit: The Natural Resources Defense Council (www.nrdc.org), who, in their own words, “work to safeguard the earth – its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.” the NRDC has been doing advocacy and litigation work on behalf of climate change, clean water and our precious earth since 1970.

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Released June 18, 2018
Sean Ono Lennon – upright bass, electric & acoustic guitar, percussion, keyboards
John Cameron Mitchell – Vocals
Zoë Keating – Cello
Amanda Palmer – Vocals

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Musicians cover each other’s songs often enough that the results rarely qualify as news. But covering a whole album, song for song? That’s a labor of love ambitious enough to warrant attention.

The website Turntable Kitchen, which aims to bring food and music together in various ways, recently launched a monthly vinyl series called Sounds Delicious. Each month, a different artist covers an entire album, which the site makes available both as colored vinyl and as a digital download; the records can be ordered individually or by subscription. Participating artists include Foxygen’s Jonathan Rado (covering Bruce Springsteen’s Born To Run) and Death Cab For Cutie’s Ben Gibbard (who’ll tackle Teenage Fanclub’s Bandwagonesque), as well as The Pains Of Being Pure At Heart, GEMS and more bands.

For the next entry, due out June 23rd, Mutual Benefit — whose gorgeous albums offer an ornate and stately take on vintage folk and pop sounds — will tackle Vashti Bunyan’s 1970 classic Just Another Diamond Day. As these covers of “Jog Along Bess” and “Glow Worms” suggest, Bunyan and Mutual Benefit bandleader Jordan Lee are ideally matched, with a similar affinity for gentle introspection.

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“When I was approached about covering a full album, it was a no-brainer to attempt reinterpreting Just Another Diamond Day,” Lee writes via email. “Since my school days, it’s been one of those pieces of music that has been able to transport me to a calmer, more magical world than the one we currently inhabit. It was a unique assignment to use the downtime between tours to pay homage to an album I’ve spent so much time daydreaming with, especially since her songwriting style of soft-spoken observations — mixed with Robert Kirby’s intuitive string arrangements — has been such an enduring influence on my own music.

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“The legend of Diamond Day is almost too good to be true. In the late ’60s, feeling disenchanted from the life of people trying to make her into a pop star, [Bunyan] dropped out of society and took this long journey across the country to get to a commune, writing songs along the way. Eventually, she recorded this incredible and deeply personal album, but it was a complete commercial flop, so she decided she’d rather be a farmer instead of a singer-songwriter. It wasn’t until decades later that an acquaintance came upon Just Another Diamond Day on eBay for thousands of dollars and realized that various contemporary folk artists were calling the album a lost masterpiece.

“While much of the album is pretty compatible with our aesthetic, ‘Jog Along Bess’ was actually one of the more difficult songs to do in our own voice. The sing-songy lyrics mixed with the rollicking ‘good times’ story is something we had never tried to do. We are definitely amateurs at rollicking. Eventually, I started to get really into the lyrics about this misfit crew of people and doggies trying to make it across the country in a half-broken vehicle. I could definitely relate. The more people we had over to collaborate, the more the song took on its own life.”

Mutual Benefit’s album-length cover of Just Another Diamond Day comes out June 23rd via Turntable Kitchen’s Sounds Delicious vinyl series.

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Philadelphian indie quartet The Districts have shared a cover of Joy Division’s famous 1980 single, “Love Will Tear Us Apart.”

The band’s cover is accompanied by a series of moving, flashing images of scientists performing ominous experiments. The Districts frontman Rob Grote adds a more animated take on Ian Curtis’ famously strange deadpan vocals while the band turns Joy Division’s jolting post-punk into a warm, indie-rock sound that Districts fans will recognize in an instant.

The Districts recently released a limited edition 7”, “Nighttime Girls” backed by b-side “Soft Auxiliary,” via their Bandcamp page. “Nighttime Girls” is a gritty garage-pop/rock tune, which the band says is “about the allure of escapism and a character’s general preoccupation with shallowness and neon light.”

After touring with Chicago’s Twin Peaks in support of The District’s 2017 LP, Popular Manipulations, they’ll be making a stop at various Festival’s, as well as some additional headlining shows and festivals across the U.K. and Europe.

The band’s latest album, Popular Manipulations resembles a sunset that’s far more than ordinary, the red sky at night before the darkness of the latest hours. It’s an album thats not letting anyone down.”

The Districts cover Joy Division’s classic “Love Will Tear Us Apart” along with moving images.

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Why did they actually do it? … This is the question every Smithereens fan—and every fan of The Who—must ask when listening to The Smithereens Play Tommy. It is common knowledge that Tommy is terrific, full of songs worth playing. And it’s common knowledge that The Smithereens—a briefly big power-pop outfit from North Jersey that had a small string of hits and fine albums in the 1980s—are a band deeply in love with the British Invasion.  The Smithereens, packing dosed-up guitars that ring with power and full-throated singing, are up to the task of playing Tommy. The band, in short, sounds a whole lot like The Who. This is an accurate, respectful maybe too respectful—recreation of a classic album release.

In 2007, Pat DiNizio (lead vocals and guitar) and his band released Meet the Smithereens, a track-by-track cover of Meet the Beatles. It was followed within a year-plus by B-Sides – the Beatles, a collection of less common tunes by the Fab Four. On the backs of these heartfelt but relatively unadventurous tributes, The Smithereens toured small theaters all over the country, playing their hits, sure, but also playing these ringingly familiar classics to receptive ears. It is ingenious, really, because releasing new albums of original music and hoping that the new music will be received happily by the band’s now-middle-aged fans .

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Friends, I have some announcements! First of all, I’d like to share my video for “It Changes”: three and a half minutes of illustrated colourful madness, courtesy of Ben Clarkson. Hope you enjoy! Second of all, I have a whole EP named “Cannonball EP” which I would love you to listen too and a few european select dates. Alongside “It Changes” it will feature my reworking of Nick Drake’s “Which Will” and also 3 more as of yet unreleased tracks. .

It Changes is written by Annelotte De Graaf
Produced and recorded by Ben Greenberg
Mixed by Jez Williams

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Guitars by Manuel van den Berg and Annelotte de Graaf
Bass by Ronald Straetemans
Drums by Jaap Bontekoe
Keys by Ella van der Woude

Having reached the age of retirement this weekend, I’ve decided not to retire and instead play even more shows. I had a great birthday at home in Nashville with my friends and felines. We capped off the celebrations with an epic karaoke groove.
Thanks to everyone who sent birthday wishes, I love you all. I’m a dismal Brit in many ways, but I’m also I’m a chronic sentimentalist. Go Pisces! Wait ’til you see the silk fish shirt I bought to celebrate my 65th.

In May I’ll be playing solo and band dates in the UK. In June you’ll find me in Ireland and France. Full details on my website.
In other news, in 1982 I went to Norway and I never came back. The place has an empty ghostliness that entered my soul for life. My 2011 album “Tromsø, Kaptein” was released in Norway only as a loving tribute. I’m happy to say the album is now available in the US, UK and other countries by request. CDs are ready to be shipped and vinyl pre-orders will be sent out in April. I’ve been playing these songs live for quite a while, so you may have already heard “The Abyss”, “Old Man Weather” and “Light Blue Afternoon”.
By the by, my occasional collaborator and harmony singer Emma Swift has recorded a gorgeous version of Neil Young’s ‘Mellow My Mind”.

If you’re looking for something new to watch on tv, I can recommend “Electric Dreams”. I contributed a cover of Syd Barrett’s “Octopus” featuring Graham Coxon from Blur on lead guitar and harmonies. I was delighted to watch the episode it appears in and see Steve Buscemi apparently listening to it on repeat. Good on you, Steve! Good on you, Syd! . 

It’s a nice rainy night here in Tennessee, so I am going to curl up with the cats and a new book. Don’t worry, I’m still addicted to social media and if you want to keep in touch, Peace, love, polka dots.
Robyn H x

From the new self titled record from Robyn Hitchcock – out now on Yep Roc Records