Posts Tagged ‘Cover’

Not content with a charity cover of the Goo Goo Dolls’ ‘Iris’ and the EP “Copycat Killer”, an orchestral EP of songs from her 2020 album Punisher, Phoebe Bridgers has now released a Christmas cover in November. It is a cover of Merle Haggard’s ‘If We Make It Through December’, of which proceeds from sales and streams will go directly to Downtown Women’s Center, an organisation in Los Angeles focused exclusively on serving and empowering women experiencing homelessness and formerly homeless women.

In keeping with her annual tradition of releasing a charity track for the holidays, Phoebe Bridgers latest song is a cover released today on Dead Oceans. 

Produced by Tony BergEthan Gruska and Phoebe, and accompanied solely by Ethan on piano, the beautiful, melancholy rendition of Haggard’s 1974 track is a fitting end to a volatile year. Last year, Bridgers’ holiday single benefited Planned Parenthood. 

Phoebe Bridgers covers “If We Make It Through December” by Merle Haggard, out November 23rd on Dead Oceans Records.

Quivers make cathartic guitar pop that jangles and shimmers somewhere between 1980s Australia and 1990s America. Championing our favourite up-and-coming artists has always been the foundation of Turntable Kitchen. Over the course of more than 100 releases, we’ve released debut wax from bands like MØ, Arlo Parks, No Vacation, Gallant, Tei Shi, Cathedrals, The Record Company, Crumb, Tender, and so so many more incredible rising bands.

Rising Melbourne-based Quivers captured the attention late last year with a pair of incredibly catchy, captivating singles: “You’re Not Always On My Mind” and “When It Breaks.” Fully formed and with a knack for easy, upbeat song writing, we immediately knew they were something special. In fact, we’ve been “all in” on them since that first listen. Back in January we were honoured to release their first ever vinyl single (sold out) and now we’re proud to share their contribution to our SOUNDS DELICIOUS series.

They selected R.E.M.’s “Out of Time” for their contribution to the series, flipping the script on tracks like “Shiny Happy People” (a sprawling psychedelic vibe here); shedding off some of the jangle to reimagine classics like “Losing My Religion” and transforming the cult classic “Country Feedback” into a gorgeous and stripped down piano ballad. 

Quivers’ version of “Out of Time” is only available by subscribing to the SOUNDS DELICIOUS vinyl record club.

Quivers got to choose a ‘classic’ to cover for Turntable Kitchen’s Sounds Delicious vinyl series and selected R.E.M.’s Out of Time (1991) Album. We hope you like our re-imagining of the record and we hope Mike Mills doesn’t sue us (I had a dream he would, twice).

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releases December 4th, 2020

All tracks written by Bill Berry, Peter Buck, Mike Mills and Michael Stipe. Turntable Kitchen has sorted the relevant license. Recorded over 4 days at Second World Studios Rehearsal Space in Fairfield with Matthew Redlich. Mastered for vinyl by John Ruberto.

Quivers are:
Sam Nicholson – sings, guitars
Bella Quinlan – sings, bass, guitars
Holly Thomas – sings, drums
Michael Panton – sings, guitars.

 

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The latest installment in Turntable Kitchen’s series of releases featuring artists covering a full album of their choice is one of its most curious: The Pains of Being Pure At Heart tackling Full Moon Fever, the 1989 solo effort by Tom Petty. It’s a novel, unexpected choice for the band considering their core sound, but it’s also one that doesn’t make for the most gentle transition to a shoegaze/dreampop format. The otherwise sturdy songs have been made wispy and empty at their core, with even The Byrds’ “I’ll Feel A Whole Lot Better” turned into something dippy and fey. The key downfall is Kip Berman’s vocal performances throughout.

He didn’t need to try and replicate the twang-y tones of Petty but Berman makes the wrong choices throughout. He opts for his breathy croon when he should growl, and growls when he should get dreamy. It upends the more inventive moments like the band’s rendering of “A Face In The Crowd” as a synthpop dance classic and “A Mind With A Heart Of Its Own” as Beatles-esque blues. A pleasant diversion that will only inspire revisits to the Petty original. Maybe that was the point all along. Pains’ Kip Berman announced his debut solo EP Know Me More under the name the Natvral. Last year, the band released The Echo of Pleasure.

The Pains of Being Pure at Heart have covered Tom Petty’s 1989 solo debut Full Moon Fever in its entirety. It’s due out October 25th as part of Turntable Kitchen’s ongoing Sounds Delicious series—a monthly vinyl subscription of full-length cover albums, Full Moon Fever was Petty’s solo debut record and it is absolutely packed with hits. No less than 5 tracks charted on the Billboard Top 100: Free Fallin’, I Won’t Back Down, Runnin’ Down a Dream, Yer So Bad, and A Face in the Crowd. But even the tracks that didn’t chart could have been hits: Love Is A Long Road, Depending On You, A Mind With a Heart of its Own. The same could be said for so many of his albums. This dude’s catalogue is deep.

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Last month, we threw a Save Stereogum livestream event for our VIP crowdfunding donors. One of the performances was from DIIV, who offered up a brand-new cover of Psychic TV’s “The Orchids,” which appears on the band’s 1983 album Dreams Less Sweet. The band has now shared it for all to watch and it comes with a tribute to Psychic TV leader Genesis P-Orridge, who passed away earlier this year: “truly one of the most revolutionary and inspiring musicians of the century.”

Recorded for Stereogum’s ‘Save Stereogum’ livestream, here is DIIV’s cover of Psychic TV’s 1983 song ‘The Orchids’.

Since writing “Woodstock” while inside a New York City hotel room, Joni Mitchell’s counterculture anthem has been covered repeatedly throughout the last 50 years, most famously with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young’s electrifying version on Déjà Vu.

Now, a folky rendition by Bonnie Raitt has been unearthed, recorded at a March 27th, 1971, performance at Syracuse University’s Jabberwocky Club. Raitt was just 21 and eight months away from dropping her self-titled debut. Unlike many covers of Mitchell’s spiritual song, Raitt’s version is stripped-down and acoustic, using solely her voice to channel the muddy festival on Max Yasgur’s farm. Her register is akin to Mitchell’s, soaring through the octaves with each line: “And I dreamed I saw the bombers/Riding shotgun in the sky/And they were turning into butterflies/Above our nation.”

This is a real lost gem of the 21 year old Bonnie Raitt singing Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock”. The Jabberwocky Club was in the basement of the cafeteria at Syracuse University. The gig was recorded by WAER radio but was never released as one of her albums. Its considered a bootleg and hard to find. Many current music stars like James Taylor played here because WAER would do the broadcasts “live” to the New York area. 

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Prior to closing its doors in 1985, the Jabberwocky Club hosted James Brown, James Taylor, Jackson Browne, Roger McGuinn, and more. The campus’ FM radio station, WAER, would broadcast the live performances in New York. Raitt’s set has been bootlegged, but is extremely rare.

Desperate Journalist’s new lockdown cover of ‘The Fear’ by Pulp is out now. The band are currently working on new material, the follow-up to 2019’s ‘In Search Of The Miraculous’.

Much-admired darkpop dreamers DESPERATE JOURNALIST are popping their heads out of the giant pandemic duvet with the special release of their cover of Pulp’s ‘The Fear’ on October 2nd.

Back in the panic-stricken spring of 2020, when the growing global pandemic ensured that the playing of gigs suddenly became as practical as the flying of pigs, fierce panda asked its newly domesticated acts to choose a favourite tune by a.n.other band with which to rockdown in lockdown. These covers would form the Covid Version Sessions, informal home recordings designed to capture the unsettling mood of the moment, and now those recordings are all seeing the digital release light of day throughout the autumn.

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and doom’n’boom experts Desperate Journalist couldn’t really capture the unsettling mood of the moment much more adroitly than by flirting with a song called ‘The Fear’ and anointing it with their patented brand of bruisingly low slung indie sass.

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“We are all fans of Pulp in the band, but my personal favourite album of theirs is ‘This Is Hardcore’,” explains singer Jo. “It’s where Jarvis’s talent for the great observational lyric meets a cracking in his writerly facade, and the parallels between all the unusually personal angst in the songs and the death-of-the-Britpop-party cultural landscape of the UK at the time add up to a sublimely melancholic and relatable whole. It’s my go-to hangover record so (as bassist Simon says) I know it like the back of my hand. Anyway our friend Kevin kept suggesting we do a cover of ‘The Fear’ every now and again and it finally made sense in April what with the entire world slowly supernovaing into oblivion around us, all shut in our houses, so we had a go, because there was nothing else to do.”

Desperate Journalist have been more lockdowned than most this year: after the sensational response to their 2019 album ‘In Search Of The Miraculous’ – their third exemplary long-player – the foursome were already hiding away working on new material when the proverbial pandemic shutters came slamming down in March. Desperate Journalist’s fearless take on ‘The Fear’ is the second of the fierce panda Covid Version releases in the wake of woozy dreamboats MOON PANDA, who took The Strokes’ ‘Call It Fate, Call It Karma’ outside for a big cosmic cuddle on September 11th. More CV tunes from GHOST SUNS, JEKYLL, CHINA BEARS and NATIONAL SERVICE coming soon… 

Until the end
Ooh, ooh-ooh, ooh, ooh-ooh
Ooh, ooh-ooh, ooh, ooh-ooh

Released October 2nd, 2020
Written By: Pulp (Candida Doyle / Jarvis Branson Cocker / Mark Andrew Webber / Nick Banks / Stephen Patrick Mackey)

Performed By: Desperate Journalist [Jo Bevan (vocals), Rob Hardy (guitar), Simon Drowner (bass) and Caroline Helbert (drums)]

I’ll never forget where I was when I first discovered The Cranberries’ “Dreams”: as they put the song on repeat all afternoon. I may someday forget where I was when I first heard Living Hour’s kinda dreamy cover version, While it’s far from the heat-stroke shoegaze that first drew me to Sam Sarty’s project, this cover shares its unique deep-exhalation appeal. Oh, and careful—when you google “living hour dreams” it autocorrects to “living your dreams,” which is apparently a song from Beverly Hills Chihuahua 3. This is not that song.

Living Hour’s expansive, gentle and slow indie rock is distinguished by lovelorn melodies, transient polyrhythms, and a dreamy instrument palette that includes heavenly interlocking guitars, casiotone keyboards, and brass. Floating over these warm sparkles of sound are Sam Sarty’s emotive lead vocals, which are intoxicatingly smokey and vulnerable.

Living Hour recorded their early songs with friend and producer Riley Hill in the west end of their hometown, Winnipeg, Canada. Their self-titled debut album was released on cassette in early 2016 on Bloomington’s Tree Machine Records, introducing the band’s cinematic sound and propelling years of DIY touring in Canada, USA, and Europe.

Living Hour’s Softer Faces was released by Brooklyn’s Kanine Records in February 2019 with production by Kurt Feldman (The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, DIIV, Depreciation Guild) and Jarvis Taveniere (Woods, Purple Mountains, Parquet Courts).

 The album received acclaim from NPR, Stereogum, Paste, Vice, Bandcamp, AllMusic, The Grey Estates, Gold Flake Paint and more.

 “Some of the most heartsick synth-pop since Cocteau Twins.” – Noisey

Winnipeg rockers Living Hour dream big with grandiose, all-encompassing shoegaze that stretches to the ends of the earth.” -Stereogum

Riding out the inevitable backlash against their ultimately brave decision to not just remain a touring museum piece and suddenly start writing new songs, chances are that their new single ‘Hear Me Out’ may actually get the attention that a new single by one of the greatest and most revolutionary guitar bands of all time deserves. Paz Lenchantin – bass player for the last six years – is given full reign to take on duties, her heavenly voice soaring over this and even better is the cover of T Rex’s camp glam classic ‘Mambo Sun’ on the other side. Not at all the done thing any more, we realise, but you might even consider putting your hand in your pocket and buying a copy. 

Hear Me Out taken from Pixies’ new double A side single “Hear Me Out / Mambo Sun”. Once again Pixies were part of musical landscape. With such a prolific catalogue, though, there are inevitably loads of great songs that have slipped through the cultural net. So, to celebrate their new single ‘Mambo Sun’, cover of a T Rex classic.

Guitar, Vocals: Charles Thompson Drums, Percussion: David Lovering Guitar: Joey Santiago Bass Guitar: Paz Lenchantin Backing Vocals: Paz Lenchantin Engineer, Composer, Writer: Marc Bolan

We decided to cover a song from Frank Zappa’s first album “Freak Out” released back in 1966. It’s called “Trouble Every Day” and we found it very relevant to these times which is strange and sad that after all these years we’re still on the first page! We are condemning these horrible nonsense actions against the Black Community and condemning police brutality! We need to learn more and these actions against black people need to stop right now and we need to stop it. 

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All proceeds goes to NAACP Legal Defense Fund. We all need to listen more and learn more and if you see something that we’re doing wrong call us out and we will do better. Let’s keep fighting for Justice and Peace!

Originally released June 6th, 2020
Lyrics – Frank Zappa

Greenway Records 2020

I first heard this song when I was in my early 20’s, on a mix cassette that my then girlfriend’s cool older brother made me. I was instantly entranced – there was something so evocative about the arrangement, the transcendental and romantic lyrical imagery, and Buckley’s deeply soulful voice. I knew one of these days I’d cover it. Took me twenty-plus years to find the right situation to do it. Josh and Anaïs Mitchell (and the stellar assemblage of players on this recording) took this song in a new direction that made me fall in love with it all over again. Long live buzzin’ flies, ringing mountains, flowing rivers, and seabirds who knew your name! — Eric D. Johnson

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Released August 25th, 2020