Posts Tagged ‘Live’

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This is a 2 disc set (Calling Hard Part 1 and 2) that was authorized as an official release as part of the G-Men Bootleg series Volume 1 (Castle Music). The overall package included the 2 calling hard discs as well as the Bullfrog Interlude disc as well. The set was released in 1992 and since it was volume 1 it would imply there was to be more in the series. Sadly Rory’s death in 1994 probably put an end to that. I give these recordings all 5 stars. I’m a huge Rory fan and I’ve heard a lot of his music both officially released and bootlegs and these recordings really capture the live feel of a Rory concert.

The energy is high and his playing is fantastic. I was fortunate enough to see him 3 times before he passed and when I feel like listening to a live recording of his shows these are the ones I go to first. The sound quality is very impressive. I don’t know if they are soundboard recordings but they are of a very high quality. They’re not as slick as his live recording “Stage Struck” which was obviously done for commercial release but any flaws are part of the experience like going to one of his shows. I would compare these to his “Live in Europe” release from 1972, but there’s so much more music. I always love “Live in Europe” but when its done I feel like I want more.

Rory Gallagher – Calling Hard 1 & 2
Recorded Live At Golden Green , April 14th,1974 London
1-1 Messin’ With The kid
1-2 Craddle Rock
1-3 I Wonder Who
1-4 Tattoo Lady
1-5 Stampin’ Ground
1-6 Who’s That Coming
1-7 Bullfrog Blues

Recorded Live At Hammersmith Odeon , June 22nd,1977 London
1-8 Do You Read Me
1-9 Secret Agent
1-10 Calling Card
2-1 Bought And Sold
2-2 Too Much Alchool
2-3 Going To My Hometown
2-4 Country Mile
2-5 Bullfrog Blues

Recorded Live At Middlesex Polytechinic , May 15th,1979 In London
2-6 Shin Kicker
2-7 Mississippi Sheiks
2-8 Do You Read Me
2-9 Brute Force And Ignorance
2-10 Tattoo Lady
2-11 Shadow Play
2-12 Cruise On Out

The Band

  • Rory Gallagher – Vocals, Guitars, Mandolin, Harmonica
  • Gerry McAvoy – Bass Guitar

Calling Hard Part One

  • Rod de’Ath – Drums, Percussion
  • Lou Martin – Piano

Calling Hard Part Two

  • Ted McKenna – Drums, Percussion
These discs deliver. I highly recommend this and even though they are hard to find they are worth the effort and the money. If your a Rory fan you wont be disappointed.
Released through Seagull Records

Margo Price live album, margo price, perfectly imperfect at the ryman, jack white, emmylou harris, sturgill simpson, jack white, ryman auditorium, musicares covid 19 relief fund, bandcamp

Margo Price has released a new live album, “Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman”, which documents her sold-out three-night run at the iconic Nashville, TN venue in 2018. The album comes after Price announced back in March she would delay the May 8th release of her new Sturgill Simpson produced studio album, “That’s How Rumors Get Started”, due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

“I am so excited that we are releasing it today,” said Price in a press release. “The recordings are rough and the performances are raw, but there was a magic there and the band was on fire. We played unreleased songs, alternative album versions and had lots of special guests. I hope it moves you.”

The 11-track album features collaborations with Emmylou Harris on Margo’s original, “Wild Women”, Sturgill Simpson on a rendition of Rodney Crowell‘s “Ain’t Livin Long Like This”, and Jack White on a duet of the rare White Stripes track, “Honey We Can’t Afford to Look This Cheap”. Additionally, Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman also features a “funk version” of Price’s Midwest Farmer’s Daughter track, “Weekender”, and a take on the title track of her 2017 LP, All American Made.

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“Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman” is available now via Bandcamp. Preview the album below, scroll down for the full tracklist and credits, and purchase it for $10, All proceeds will benefit the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund.

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The Lemon Twigs “LIVE”:
Compiled from recordings of The Lemon Twigs’ live performances in late 2018, early 2019 on the “Go To School” tour, here is The Lemon Twigs LIVE. If you close your eyes while you listen, you’ll experience EXACTLY what it would be like to go to a Lemon Twigs show wearing a blindfold. This live record is so good. The brothers are a whole different beast live.
The album is available exclusively on bandcamp. All of the proceeds will go to Coalition for the Homeless, who are helping NYC’s most vulnerable during this trying time and have been since 1981. For more information on them go to their website: www.coalitionforthehomeless.org 

Recorded live to tape during shows in Pawtucket RI, Northampton MA, and Los Angeles CA.

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Brian: I really wanted to release it when we first got off the road, but I don’t know if our label was that interested. But yeah, I’m happy with it. It was such a weird time after we released Go to School. I felt we should come off of an album like that by getting some string players together and trying to do this orchestral/theatrical thing. And Michael’s headspace was really not there; he wanted to do the opposite of that album, practically. And we had these musicians with us that were so great, who came from the jazz world. It ended up being a lot of jamming, which I never expected to do in my life—a lot more soloing than I ever thought I would want to do. [Laughs.] It’s cool to look back on, even though it was relatively recently. I don’t think we’ll ever be able to get that side of us across on a studio record; and when we do tour for this record, I think it will be a lot different than how we sounded on that tour.

Michael: We recorded it on a little cassette machine; we didn’t know if we were going to put it out with our label or if we’d slip it out like a bootleg, but we wanted to make it something interesting, not just put out a live album that’s really boring. The live albums that are cool are the ones where they completely transform the songs, or the ones where they just talk—or maybe they do the songs really intimately. And this gave us the opportunity to document that period. It was very intense to do that kind of stuff every night; it was hard work, and I really wanted a snapshot of it. Because I don’t know if I always want to be that intense, you know what I mean?

The Group:
Brian D’Addario – guitar, keyboards, vocals
Michael D’Addario -guitar, vocals
Tommaso Taddonio – keyboards
Daryl Johns – bass, vocals
Andres Valbuena – drums, vocals

Released April 29th, 2020

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There’s no discography in rock like Jimi Hendrix’s, not because he died at the age of just 27 but because–unlike Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison and Kurt Cobain, all also gone at the age of 27 years of age, Hendrix was a true improviser. So in his case, The concert tapes merit prolonged attention. Jimi Hendrix’s studio career began in October 1966 and ended when he asphyxiated on his own vomit in September 1970. While alive he generated three albums with the Jimi Hendrix Experience (Brits Noel Redding on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums) plus the live Band of Gypsys LP (Africa-Americans Billy Cox on bass and Buddy Miles on drums). That he left behind a much vaster body of important music reflects his enduring status as the greatest electric guitarist ever. How many versions of “Foxy Lady” do you need to hear ? So start deciding here.

Jimi Hendrix was despite being so enigmatic and galvanizing in front of a live audience, he actually hated being out on the road. In his defense, “the road” in the 1960s was an unforgiving and punishing place to be, especially when plotted out in advance by Hendrix’s manager, Michael Jeffery. One night he and his band, The Experience, would be playing a gym in Santa Barbara, California, and the next night they’d find themselves in an arena in Seattle, Washington. Patently brutal. Then there was the added anxiety of being far away from the recording studio — the place where he felt most at home. To Hendrix, touring was more stress than it was worth. It was just something he had to do to keep the black lights at Electric Lady Studios on.

Jimi Hendrix was only on the scene for about four years of his life, but he absolutely made the most of that time. Amid a vast number of classic, immortal live recordings, he toured incessantly and performed an incredible number of live shows that still have the ability to shock and surprise nearly 50 years on. From the Fillmore East to the Fillmore West, from Woodstock and Monterey to Paris, and London, and everywhere else that he and whatever group was backing him went, the possibility that real magic might present itself .

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THE OLYMPIA THEATRE  Paris– OCTOBER 18th, 1966

Some concerts are bound to get a little more shine due to their historic nature, like this gig at the Olympia Theatre in Paris from 1966. This was the first time that The Jimi Hendrix Experience, with Mitch Mitchell on drums and Noel Redding on bass, played together as a group in front of a paying audience — opening for the “French Elvis Presley”, Johnny Hallyday, no less. This was the first recorded live set as opposed to Hendrix’s last known gig at the Isle of Fehmarn on September 6th, 1970, other highlights are maybe his performance at the Isle of Wight a few weeks earlier, but both of those are kind of shambolic and more than a little morbid. Even though this show was only 15 minutes long, you get a real sense of the kind of fire Hendrix was playing with around the time he first hit the scene. The band’s first single, “Hey Joe”, sounds great, but it’s the Howlin’ Wolf cover “Killing Floor” that will leave your jaw on the floor.

Rumour has it that there were 14,500 people attending, however the theatre can’t hold more than 2,500. During the first part of the show the JHE played for just 15 minutes and did three songs. Jimi also played guitar during the finale before the intermission. Chas Chandler and Jimi watched the performance of Johnny Hallyday and Chas made a study of Hallyday’s stage-act. After the show everyone (including Chas Chandler) went to a Paris nightclub. The 1966 tour of France marked the first shows performed by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, on October 13th. This was only one week after the formation of the band, after drummer Mitch Mitchell joined on October 6.

THE MONTEREY POP FESTIVAL – JUNE 18th, 1967

When Jimi Hendrix left New York City for the UK in 1966, hardly anyone in his home country even noticed. When he came back on June 18th, 1967, for the Monterey Pop Festival in northern California, they could hardly tear their eyes away. As opposed to Woodstock where one song transcended the rest of the Hendrix’s set, at Monterey, the guitarist’s violent, sexually charged rendition of The Troggs’ “Wild Thing” was a culmination. Seemingly intent on topping The Who’s explosive performance of “My Generation” that preceded him, when it came to ending his own showing, Hendrix pulled out all the stops. Even watching now, the display of him grinding his custom-painted Stratocaster against the stack of Marshall amps before throwing it down to the ground and riding it like a familiar love is shocking to behold. Then comes the lighter fluid; and then the match and then the flames. At Monterey, Hendrix threw down the gauntlet to his generation of fellow artists: Either become daring, or remain irrelevant.

This remastered version of 1986’s Jimi Plays Monterey features one of Hendrix’s most significant performances: What was his breakthrough show at the Monterey Pop Festival on June 18th, 1967. You can’t see him set his guitar on fire here, but you can hear the electricity surging through the festival grounds. Most of the songs come from Hendrix’s just-released debut album, “Are You Experienced” along with a few blues covers, like the scorching set-opener, Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor.”

Hendrix was such a creative mercurial genius that no two shows were ever alike. His legendary performance at the Monterey Pop Festival captures The Experience in full flow, culminating with an incendiary version of Wild Thing . Although not available in full until 2007, half of his extraordinary set was released in 1970 with highlights from Otis Redding’s equally memorable appearance as Historic Performances Recorded at the Monterey International Pop Festival. Now that’s a concert bill to go down in history.

THE CAFÉ AU GO-GO – New York City MARCH 17th, 1968

One of the great things about going to any live show is the feeling that anything can happen. The patrons of the small Café Au Go-Go Club in New York City couldn’t have known when they ordered their drinks that they were about to witness one of the great, public rock and roll jam sessions of all time that spring night. To be sure, Hendrix was known to play around town while in New York City, but this gig with Elvin Bishop on rhythm guitar, Paul Butterfield on harmonica and vocals, and Buddy Miles on the drums is some next-level stuff. It’s clear from the recording that the guys were just interested in messing around, but there are some real spine-tingling moments to be gleaned here like the pickup group’s all-instrumental rendition of “Little Wing” or the cover of T-Bone Walker’s “Stormy Monday.” Jimi jammed (on ‘a rainy night’) with Paul Caruso (vocal & harmonica), Buddy Miles (vocal & drums) Elvin Bishop (guitar), James Tatum (saxophone), Herbie Rich (organ), Harvey Brooks (bass), Phillip Wilson (drums).  Jimi recorded the jam on his Sony reel-to-reel deck from the mixing board. Featured are “Everything’s Gonna Be Alright,” “Stormy Monday,” “Three Little Bears,” and “Little Wing.”

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live In Ottawa

OTTAWA CANADA CAPITAL THEATRE  March 19TH, 1968

This unique, authorized ‘bootleg’ release features a raw, two-track mixing console recording of Jimi’s March 19th, 1968 concert in Ottawa, Canada.

Jimi’s appearance in Ottawa was part of an extensive US tour organized in support of his recently issued second album, “Axis: Bold As Love”. The guitarist arrived in New York on January 30th, 1968 and immediately took part in a press reception organized by publicist Michael Goldstein. Goldstein dubbed the event “The British Are Coming” and made the Experience, as well as the other groups in the Michael Jeffery/Chas Chandler stable available to journalists and photographers at the Copter Lounge atop the Pan Am building in Manhattan.

Following the media hoopla in New York, the Experience flew to San Francisco where their tour began in earnest at the Fillmore Auditorium on February 1st. Eight shows over the course of four memorable nights at the Fillmore and Winterland Ballroom launched the tour in grand fashion.  From San Francisco, the Experience ventured across the US, performing at a mix of clubs, colleges, and medium sized auditoriums. Despite the growing popularity of Are You Experienced, issued the previous August by Reprise, Jimi’s US distributor, the Experience had only begun to develop a national following.  As a result, limited finances eschewed the comforts of a tour bus and made leasing a tour airplane unfathomable.  Instead, the group, guided by their faithful road manager Gerry Stickells, made much of their journey across the country in a rented station wagon.  In what can only be described as a remarkable test of their endurance and enthusiasm, the Experience performed sixty concerts in sixty days during the first leg of this tour.

Five weeks into their dizzying tour itinerary, the Experience arrived in Ottawa to perform two shows at the city’s venerable Capitol Theater. As he often did when performing two concerts in one evening, Jimi varied his set lists.  He maintained some staples such as “Fire” and “Foxy Lady” in each concert, but in the evening’s early performance, of which no recording is known, newspaper reviews reveal that he featured “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” and “I Don’t Live Today”.  These songs were not revived for the second show, but in their place came “Spanish Castle Magic”, an energetic reading of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor” and the lengthy instrumental workout “Tax Free”.

Experience concerts bore little resemblance to seamlessly produced present day rock events.  In 1968, a Jimi Hendrix concert was truly a counter cultural gathering, fueled in large part by the support of underground radio and college newspapers.  The concerts themselves were miles away from today’s rigidly structured events which more often resemble a Broadway production than a traditional rock and roll show.  Technically, Jimi lacked virtually everything from amplifiers capable of withstanding his sonic demands to adequate stage monitoring [during this era, Mitch was often without any monitoring whatsoever].  There were no light cues or pyrotechnics timed to announce Hendrix’s arrival onstage. Jimi simply walked out, greeted the crowd, and would quickly tune his guitar.  During the performance, technical demands and other challenges were either solved on the fly or not at all.  This hasty work invariably took place in plain view of the audience.  Jimi’s Ottawa performance was no different.  As he and his crew struggled to overcome a variety of technical difficulties, Jimi peppered the crowd with his sly wit.

If a desultory [and now rather humorous] review of Jimi’s performance, printed the following morning in the Ottawa Citizen, can be believed, the Experience sold out the second concert of the evening. It is this inspired performance which is featured on this disc.

The concert at the Capital Theater took place four days after the March 15th, Clark University performance issued as the second Dagger Records release in this series.  Like that show, the Experience were in top form throughout.  The grinding toll of their first major US tour was masked by the group’s upbeat demeanor and spirited performance.  Most important, coupled together with Live At Clark University, Live In Ottawa provides a compelling and detailed look at the Experience cresting at the peak of their friendship and unity.

There is much to be relished in this unpolished recording.  Jimi’s train whistle feedback announces his powerhouse rendition of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor”.  A stinging “Red House”, Jimi’s own blues masterwork, is even stronger.  Live In Ottawa also presents the earliest live version of “Tax Free” issued to date.  Here Mitchell and Redding push Hendrix insistently throughout the song’s complex arrangement.  The expanded introduction to “Hey Joe”, a precursor to the more elaborate efforts which would follow in the weeks and months to come, is wickedly clever and no doubt a salve to Hendrix’s restless creative spirit.  The guitarist loathed having to replicate his hits in the same manner night after night.  It is alterations and embellishments such as these which made every Jimi Hendrix performance so unique.

More than three decades later, it is performances such as these which reveal just how exciting it was to have a witnessed a Jimi Hendrix Experience concert.

How and why the concert was recorded is somewhat of a mystery.  The performance was not professionally recorded, as were later Hendrix performances at Woodstock and the Fillmore East.  Nonetheless, Jimi was obviously well aware of a tape recorder capturing the proceedings.  During his set, he made mention of it onstage, exhorting the crowd at one point to cheer so that the group’s girlfriends wouldn’t think they had bombed in Ottawa!

It is possible that Jimi himself recorded this performance on his own Sony reel to reel tape machine.  He frequently made recordings of various jam sessions and club performances for his own enjoyment.  It is more likely, however, that member of the Capital Theater stage crew documented the performance for posterity.  All of Jimi’s performance is presented in its original running order.  “Wild Thing”, the final song of the evening, cuts out just as Jimi tore through the song’s unforgettable opening chord sequence.  Apparently, the tape operator loaded his reel to reel tape machine with a 2400 hundred foot spool of blank tape.  Such a spool would provide slightly more than sixty minutes of recording time at seven and a half inches per second.  The recording begins with the introduction of the group by CKOY radio personality Nelson Davis and continues until the spool runs out. Lost is the balance of “Wild Thing”, but most of us know what happens at the end there …

MIAMI POP FESTIVAL, MAY 18th 1968

Never previously available in any form, Miami Pop Festival, introduces the first recorded stage performances of “Hear My Train A Comin'” and “Tax Free” while showcasing definitive live takes on such classics as “Fire,” “Hey Joe,” “I Don’t Live Today” and “Purple Haze.” The package includes never before published photos taken at the festival and an essay by award-winning music journalist and Grammy Museum Executive Director Bob Santelli. This album includes the show as originally recorded on site by Hendrix’s long term sound engineer, Eddie Kramer.

Footage of Hendrix performing at the 1968 Miami Pop Festival was revealed in the two-hour documentary American Masters: Jimi Hendrix – Hear My Train a Comin’, the film debuts, you can get an look at this amazing clip of Hendrix performing “Foxy Lady” onstage in Miami on May 18th, 1968 during his headlining set. The video depicts the famed left-handed guitarist powering through one of his most enduring numbers. Sporting a fedora, blond streaks in his hair, a puffy white shirt and red velvet pants, Hendrix clearly stuns his daytime audience with his explosive, soulful playing.

This live album by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, documenting their May 18th, 1968 performance at the Miami Pop Festival. It album features eight songs recorded during their evening performance, along with two afternoon-show performances.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live At Woburn

WOBURN MUSIC FESTIVAL on JULY 6th, 1968

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live At Woburn is the eleventh release in the Dagger Records authorized ‘bootleg’ recording series. Live At Woburn presents a 100% previously unreleased concert recording capturing The Jimi Hendrix Experience in concert at the Woburn Music Festival on July 6th, 1968.

The Woburn Music Festival was one of Britain’s first large scale, open-air rock music events. Staged by brothers Richard “Rik” and John Gunnell, who were well respected individuals in the burgeoning London music scene where they were heavily involved in many aspects including band managed, show promoters and club owners. Rik in particular, who owned three fashionable 1960’s London nightspots—the Ram Jam Club, Flamingo, and Bag O’ Nails—presented authentic, first generation American icons like John Lee Hooker and Otis Redding and some of the brightest examples of a swelling wave of emerging British talent such as The Rolling Stones, Jack Bruce and Georgie Fame.

Jimi’s co-managers Chas Chandler and Michael Jeffery—a fellow nightclub entrepreneur—enjoyed a friendship with Gunnell. Gunnell had been an early supporter of The Animals, and extended the same courtesy to Hendrix and The Experience, presenting some of the group’s earliest London engagements.

Jimi’s popularity had grown exponentially since those early days in 1966 and he arrived at the Woburn Festival as its eagerly anticipated headline act. This anticipation was fueled in part by Jimi’s absence from Britain. The Experience had spent much of 1968 touring and recording in America and had not performed live in Britain since December 1967.

Woburn Music Festival featured separate afternoon and evening sets for both Saturday and Sunday. While rhythm & blues was the primary focus with Gunnell drawing heavily from his own talent pool, casting John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, Alexis Korner, and Geno Washington together with the more folk influenced Pentangle, Roy Harper, and Tim Rose. The Jimi Hendrix Experience were scheduled to close the Saturday evening show where an enthusiastic crowd some 14,000 strong turned out for the performance.

Axis: Bold As Love was still a top selling album in July 1968 but Jimi had long since moved on to new challenges. To Hendrix, performances such as Woburn were unique, shared experiences and not simply personal appearances intended to help shift units of albums or singles. At Woburn, Jimi skipped songs from Axis: Bold As Love altogether, electing instead to ‘jam’ as he called it kicking off his set with a spirited “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” regrettably missed in part by the late start of the recording machine]. The trio followed “Sgt. Pepper” with “Fire,” and despite beset with buzzing, crackles and otherwise unwanted noises throughout their set, uThe Experience continued to persevere doing their best to surmount the technical problems that hampered an otherwise animated set.

Jimi may have bypassed Axis: Bold As Love, but he did foreshadow his next album at Woburn, stretching out a marvelous “Tax Free,” a contender for Electric Ladyland and a favourite Experience vehicle for improvisation. Hendrix followed up with an extended improvisational rendition of “Red House” before diving into “Foxey Lady.” He also offered his Woburn audience what he called, ‘…a song that we recorded for our new LP. It’s nothing but a hard rock—it’s called “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)”.

Equipment problems were always an irritant for Jimi and Woburn was no exception. He prefaced “Purple Haze,” the group’s final song, with an apology. “We’re very sorry that we have to play through broken amplifiers,” he explained. “Like I said before, it’s really a hang up. It’s very hard to get our own sound across so we would like to end it and say thank you very much for showing up. We would like to do this last song “Purple Haze.” Jimi kicked off a boisterous feedback opening, buttressed by Mitchell and Redding and complete with tremolo bar swoops, wah-wah pedal shadings and soaring dive bomb styled bursts that transitioned seamlessly into the song’s unmistakable opening notes. At its conclusion, the audience roared with approval. While no microphones were positioned to fully capture the intensity of their reaction, their enthusiasm and calls for more can be easily heard through Jimi and Noel’s stage microphones.

The Experience’s performance at Woburn Music Festival would mark the trio’s last performance in England until the two celebrated concerts in February 1969 at the Royal Albert Hall.

Technical Note:

Like many of the live releases issued as part of the Dagger Records series, The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live At Woburn was not professionally recorded using multi-track technology. It was instead drawn from a recording made from the stage soundboard.

As a result, the recording is not without its share of flaws and technical limitations. The recording is raw and occasionally overdriven but it effectively presents all of the voices and instruments onstage. In addition to the aforementioned late start on “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” the ending of “Tax Free” was lost when the tape ran out. Fortunately, the tape spool was rethreaded and recording resumed for the start of “Red House”. It is entirely possible that another song was performed and not recorded but there is no firm evidence to definitively confirm this either way.

As noted, the buzzing, crackling and static not otherwise emanating from Jimi and Noel’s battered amplifiers are part of this historical document. Its flaws notwithstanding, this recording represents the only known documentation of this significant performance. The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live At Woburn, despite its technical imperfections, supplies yet
another fascinating piece to the Hendrix puzzle.

THE WINTERLAND BALLROOM – OCTOBER 11th, 1968

The Jimi Hendrix Experience performed six shows over three days at San Francisco’s Winterland Ballroom in October 1968. This four-disc set gathers 35 of the songs, plus a rambling interview Hendrix gave backstage from another venue a month later. it’s the cover tunes that make it worth hearing. The Highlight: a bluesy, crawling take on Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.” Burning guitars and rockets red-glaring aside, this show, the second in a run of three dates in San Francisco, was the absolute peak of Jimi Hendrix’s live performance career. Throughout its history, the Winterland Ballroom was a venue that brought the best out of those who performed there, whether it was Led Zeppelin in 1969, The Band in 1976, or Bruce Springsteen and the Sex Pistols in 1978. Hendrix, already one of the best live acts on the scene at the time, with a tremendously loyal and dedicated following in the Bay Area, brought his pure A-game to the Bill Graham-promoted concert hall.

It’s actually a pretty tall order to pick from which of the three nights from the 10th through the 12th was the best of the bunch. On the first evening, you have a tremendous, electrified version of “Hear My Train a Comin’” to go along with a twisted, psychedelic rendition of “Tax Free”. On the last night, there’s that great cover of Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love” and an explosive “Spanish Castle Magic”. But then you have the second night, and Hendrix gives you perhaps the best version of “Purple Haze” that he ever performed live to go along with a mind-blowing cover of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone”. You can’t go wrong with any of these gigs to be perfectly honest, and taken together, they really are the iconic guitarist at the very top of his game.

“Jimi Hendrix Experience- Winterland”  (versions available: 4 Disc Deluxe Box Set or 8 12″ 180 gram Vinyl Audiophile LP Deluxe Box Set .

Winterland is drawn from six stellar shows recorded over three days (October 10th, 11th and 12th, 1968) at San Francisco’s historic Winterland Ballroom.  These special performances celebrated the two year anniversary of the Jimi Hendrix Experience and came just as the groundbreaking album “Electric Ladyland” was released.

Winterland presents some of Hendrix’s most spectacular guitar work and the four CD set (also available as eight 12″ vinyl LPs) is filled with rare live versions of classic songs such as “Manic Depression,” “Are You Experienced?,” “Tax Free,” and “Little Wing” that are not part of any other Sony Legacy release.  Fans will also enjoy Hendrix’s dramatic interpretations of Cream’s “Sunshine Of Your Love” and Howlin’ Wolf’s “Killing Floor” [with the Experience joined by Jefferson Airplane bassist Jack Casady] as well his rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Like A Rolling Stone,” which has been selected as the lead track for this special release.

This special deluxe box set features never before released music from each of the six unforgettable Winterland performances.  The new standard and deluxe editions of Winterland are markedly different from a single disc compilation, long out of print, that was briefly issued by Rykodisc in 1987 and 1988.

The deluxe edition also presents a rare interview with Hendrix recorded backstage at the Boston Garden a few weeks after the Winterland performances.  This previously unreleased bonus provides fans with a unique window into Hendrix’s views about his background, his approach to the guitar and songwriting and future direction of his music. The deluxe edition also features a 36 page booked filled with previously unpublished images by acclaimed photographers Robert Knight, Allen Tannenbaum and Jim Marshall as well as an essay by noted Rolling Stone journalist David Fricke.

The featured track, “Like A Rolling Stone,” will precede the album’s release as a CD and 7″ vinyl single . The single will also feature a previously unreleased live version of “Purple Haze” from the Winterland concerts that will not be featured on the box set.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live In Cologne

LIVE IN SPORTHALLE COLOGNE , JANUARY 13th 1979 

Live in Cologne is a posthumous live album by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Released in November 2012, The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live In Cologne, the twelfth release in the Dagger Records official bootleg series, documents this spirited, January 13th, 1969 performance at the Sporthalle in Cologne,
Germany.

Hendrix kicked off the proceedings with a scalding “Come On (Let the Good Times Roll)” from Electric Ladyland. This Earl King chestnut had long been a favorite of Jimi’s and here he began with a driving solo introduction before signaling Redding and Mitchell to join. Next followed a blistering version of “Foxey Lady,” a perennial stage favorite. An abrupt tape cut precedes a memorable rendition of “Red House.” Thankfully the performance is essentially complete lacking only Jimi’s prefacing stage banter, offered as he likely changed guitars before starting. “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” followed next, not yet established as Jimi’s closing number as it would become later in 1969 and remain so throughout his career, but no less muscular.

Jimi then shifted directly into “Fire” and then a thunderous “Spanish Castle Magic.” The Experience were clearly locked in sync, pushing each other throughout all to the delight of their audience. The Experience never backed off, launching next into their first single “Hey Joe.” Jimi had to do some quick tuning on the fly, but he pressed on undaunted, boldly dashing off a lick from the Beatles’ “I Feel Fine” as he barreled through this uptempo rendition. This driving intensity built up after the solo, underscored by Jimi’s rhythm guitar work and Mitchell’s superb drumming before culminating in a rousing finale.

“Sunshine Of Your Love” was offered in tribute to Cream, all to the delight of the audience whose howls of approval can be heard even during Redding’s bass solo. “Star Spangled Banner” and “Purple Haze” capped off a truly memorable night and then the Experience were gone, whisked off to the next city and another unsuspecting audience.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live In Cologne is like other releases in the Dagger Records series. This album was not drawn from professionally recorded masters but instead an amateur, monophonic audience recording. As a result, the recording is not without various technical flaws and sonic limitations. Nonetheless, this special ‘official bootleg’ stands as a captivating document of this important chapter of Jimi’s legacy.

THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL – FEBRUARY 24th, 1969

It was over 50 years ago when the Jimi Hendrix Experience played an important concert at the Royal Albert Hall on February 24th, 1969. Although captured on film by a team of cameramen, the event seemed consigned to history and became just a distant memory of those lucky enough to be there. So, at the Royal Albert Hall the first concert was held on February 18th, 1969 . A week later on February 24th. the first show hadn’t been filmed because the lighting in the hall wasn’t sufficiently bright. On that occasion, the Experience was supported by a post-Traffic group billed as Mason, Capaldi, Wood & Frog plus Soft Machine. The first show was okay, if not wonderful.

Of course it was the music we came to experience and the sheer riveting power exercised by Jimi with that fingertip control of his trusty Fender guitar, was mesmerising. There were moments when he drifted away on secretive spiritual journeys, then came the blasting back down to earth, crash landing into total funk grind, all the while unleashing familiar riffs and teasing melodies.

Stone Free set us free from the outset. It wandered through different grooves but was always brought under control by the drummer and bass player, loyally responding to Jimi’s changing musical moods. A nod here, a glare there – there was no mistaking his unspoken directions. And when Jimi turned them loose, it was Mitch Mitchell who shone with a tumultuous drum solo that drew cheers from an audience not even at a ‘live’ concert but straining their necks to gaze up at the pulsating screen.

Mitch was always a highly regarded drummer even from his R&B days with Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames. His freewheeling style blossomed with the Experience, but could be erratic at times. Not so on the night in question. As the tiny figure launched into an astonishing assault on his double bass drum Ludwig kit, he disappeared in a mass of flying hair and shining cymbals. All we could see were the sticks flailing. On that night he out-drummed ‘em all, Baker and Bonham included. Noel Redding too stayed on the ball throughout. While never the focus of extensive camera attention, (given that all eyes were on Jimi), his bass playing gave sturdy support for Hendrix and Noel formed a perfect team mate for Mitch in the rhythm section.

As the show progressed Jimi embarked on a series of hypnotic performances playing such songs as Lover Man, I Don’t Live Today and the ultimate blues anthem Red House. The crowd leapt from the seats for Foxy Lady, Fire, Little Wing and Voodoo Chile (Slight Return), and sprawled exhausted for Purple Haze, the wonderful Wild Thing and Jimi’s tilt at the Star Spangled Banner, an anthem the former paratrooper must have heard played many a time during his 101st Airborne days.

‘Thank you very much!’ Was all Jimi could say to his audience after such a physically exhausting and emotionally draining performance that saw him kicking over Marshall amps and smashing a guitar to smithereens and finally hurling the broken neck out into the once restrained and now hysterical audience.

It was one of Hendrix manager Michael Jeffrey’s more canny moves that this gig was even booked in the first place. Originally, he and The Experience were only supposed to perform at the Royal Albert Hall for one night on February 18th, which was due to be recorded for a potential live album, but Jeffrey was worried that the band wouldn’t make the grade. His concern proved correct as both Redding and Mitchell sounded utterly lethargic at that show.

The band only had one more shot to make up for their lackluster performance, thus this gig a week later where they absolutely killed. Hendrix clearly knew that he and the band were on fire and actually went back on at the end of the night for a positively rare encore of the exceedingly rarely played “Room Full of Mirrors”. This ended up being the last show that The Experience would ever play together in Europe.

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WOODSTOCK – AUGUST 18th, 1969

One transcendent moment does not a complete concert make. Hendrix’s performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at Woodstock will forever stand as one of the defining moments of the ‘60s, but the rest of the show around that singular and notably solo – rendition of the American national anthem is somewhat shambolic. For this gig, Hendrix brought together his regular drummer, Mitch Mitchell, and his Army buddy and Band of Gypsys bassist, Buddy Cox, but also an overstuffed array of world musicians who clearly weren’t ready to tackle this material. That this was also the longest performance of Hendrix’s career actually doesn’t help its case as one might assume either. It’s not a complete disaster, however, as both “Woodstock Improvisation” and “Hey Joe” are undeniably fantastic.

Hendrix’s festival-closing set is the stuff of legend — mostly because his instrumental take on “Star Spangled Banner” sounds like a thousand bombs dropping on unsuspecting hippies at an ungodly hour. This 1999 album gathers almost his entire show (two songs sung by a rhythm guitarist are MIA), which was made up of familiar songs like “Foxey Lady” and “Purple Haze,” as well as a few blues covers. And “Star Spangled Banner,” of course.

As celebrated as Hendrix’s appearance at the Woodstock Festival was, the double disc release containing Jimi’s entire 16-track performance is nothing short of an exhausting listen. The band weren’t as tight as they should have been and Jimi extended every track to within an inch of its life, not always to its advantage. While it’s undeniably great to have access to a good quality recording of the fabled show, chances are you’ll find yourself returning to a select few incendiary performances – more than likely ‘Foxey Lady’, ‘Red House’ and the ‘Star Spangled Banner’ – but most of it is far too reliant upon seemingly endless jam sessions, and there’s only so much of that you handle at one sitting without the heady visuals to match.

Woodstock Music & Art Festival, Bethel, New York

Set List: Message To Love Hear My Train A Comin’ Spanish Castle Magic, Red House Mastermind [Larry Lee] Lover Man Foxey Lady Jam Back At The House Izabella Gypsy Woman [Larry Lee] Fire Voodoo Child (Slight Return) Star Spangled Banner Purple Haze Woodstock Improvisation Villanova Junction Blues Hey Joe

Beginning in July 1969, Jimi relocated to Shokan, a quiet upstate New York village near Woodstock for the balance of the summer. Here Hendrix was accorded sufficient time to relax and refine his new musical direction. In time, the rustic summer retreat served to rejuvenate his creative spirit. “Jimi was taking a kind of vacation out in the country, trying to get his act together,” explains Eddie Kramer. “It was all part of his developmental process, wood shedding if you want to call it that. With Billy Cox in tow, Jimi revisited his Tennessee roots once more, reaching back to guitarist Larry Lee, another old friend and veteran of the chitlin’ circuit. Where Cox had been actively involved in various music projects prior to heeding Jimi’s call, Lee had just returned from a stint in Vietnam. Also invited to Hendrix’s vacation retreat were percussionists Jerry Velez and Juma Sultan. Hendrix met Velez at Steve Paul’s Scene Club prior to the break up of the Experience. “I had just finished jamming with The McCoys,” explains Velez. “When I walked over to my table, Jimi and his entourage were sitting behind me. A little later, I joined the band on stage again for a few more tunes. When I came back to sit down, he leaned over and said, ‘Listen, I’m recording this jam over at the studio tonight. We’ll be starting around four, after this thing ends tonight. Do you want to come down and jam?’ I said sure. I went over that night and jammed with Jimi and Buddy Miles, and we seemed to hit it off.” Juma Sultan was actively involved with the Aboriginal Music Society in Woodstock, New York, and was a highly respected percussionist who would performed regularly at the Tinker Street Cinema. Both were received well during their jam’s back at the house and were invited to join Hendrix’s expanded ensemble, Gypsy Sun and Rainbows. In the weeks prior to the Woodstock festival, Jimi jammed at his rented home, as well as the Tinker Street Cinema in downtown Woodstock. Making its first and only official public appearance, Hendrix’s expanded ensemble Gypsy Sun and Rainbows performs at the Woodstock Music & Art Festival in Bethel, New York. Hendrix takes to the Woodstock stage on Monday morning with the support of Mitch Mitchell (drums), Billy Cox (bass & backing vocals), Larry Lee (rhythm guitar), Juma Sultan (percussion), and Jerry Velez (percussion). His extended set includes his magnificent rendition of the “Star Spangled Banner”.

THE FILLMORE EAST – JANUARY 1st, 1970

The one and only performance of the short-lived Band of Gypsys came at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East. The only reason this project came to fruition in the first place was due to a legal settlement between Hendrix and Ed Chalpin of PPX Recordings, whereby the latter would receive total rights to one release by the former. It was a messy situation all around and one that Hendrix wasn’t about to resolve by giving Chalpin the tapes that would make up Electric Ladyland, so instead he enlisted his old Army buddy Billy Cox to play bass and Buddy Miles of Electric Flag to play drums for a special live album project. It’s hard to say that Band of Gypsys was superior to the Experience, but this show isn’t without its merits. “Them Changes” with Miles on lead vocals is funky and fun in a way that Hendrix rarely was while performing live, but it’s the song “Machine Gun” that takes the cake. At a runtime of 12:40, it’s by no means succinct, but with that signature, simulated-gunfire riff and wandering, adventurous solos, it’s one of the most thrilling tracks in Hendrix’s canon.

Live at the Fillmore East is basically an expanded version of the 1970 live album Band of Gypsies, which was recorded on New Year’s Eve 1969 at the legendary New York club. Hendrix’s new trio were bluesier and jazzier than The Experience, so the 16 songs here — including reworked versions of “Stone Free” and “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)” — swing harder. Highlight: was the anti-war jam “Machine Gun.”

With a myriad of debatable quality bootleg live recordings available, it’s fantastic to find a great live recording of Jimi at his fiery best. Live At Fillmore East is one such beast. The double CD is taken from recordings of four nights Jimi and The Band Of Gypsys (completed by bassist Billy Cox and Buddy Miles on drums) played over New Year’s Eve 1970. If anything, this is a better place to hear Jimi with this band than the official Gypsys release that came out during the guitarist’s lifetime. Hendrix’s self-written material comes across the best – lead-off track ‘Stone Free’ is particularly powerful as it clocks in at nearly 13 minutes, but it’s good to hear the guitarist stretching out on the Buddy Miles composition ‘We Gotta Live Together’, while closer ‘Wild Thing’ serves as a reminder that while Jimi liked to improvise and jam in a live environment he was more that capable of wringing the best out of a three minute pop song.

THE L.A. FORUM – APRIL 25th, 1970

There’s something about the sunny confines of the Forum in Inglewood, California, that brought out the best in a myriad of ‘60s and ‘70s rock bands, and Jimi Hendrix was no exception. This was the first live show that Hendrix played after his foray with the Band of Gypsys and the first in seven months with Mitch Mitchell back on the skins. Hendrix sounds completely re-energized and hits the SoCal crowd with a number of heavy-hitting tracks, including one of the first performances of “Ezy Rider” and “Freedom”, which both sound incredible. The cherry of this gig, however, is the sultry and bombastic “Foxy Lady”, which, per usual, was dedicated to one of the finer specimens of the opposite sex that the guitarist spotted in the crowd.

BERKELEY COMMUNITY THEATRE – MAY 30th, 1970

Loose is the operative word when it comes to describing this concert, which took place just outside the confines of the University of California. In the context in which it was performed, it’s actually an interesting contrast to the mania of the anti-Vietnam War demonstrations that were taking place right outside the venue. In his own way, Hendrix addresses the tension permeating the atmosphere in his intro to “The Star-Spangled Banner” when he asks the crowd to get on their feet and stand for the national anthem, reminding them that “we’re all Americans.” For their troubles, he then proceeds to knock them down back on their asses with seismic versions of “Purple Haze” and “Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)”. For real music nerds, it should be noted that this show was one of the very few instances in his career when Hendrix didn’t tune his guitar down a half step and instead played this entire gig in standard tuning.

This is a tasty recording as it features Jimi Hendrix neither with the Experience nor with his Band Of Gypsys, rather the line-up here was a cross between the two. Gypsy bassist, Billy Cox and Experience drummer Mitch Mitchell backing up Jimi as he tears through blinding versions of ‘Purple Haze’ and ‘Hey Joe’. Encapsulating the best of both worlds, Hendrix was able to illustrate the experimental side of the Experience with the more funky, R&B-led style of the Gypsys. The concert captured here is the second show Hendrix and co. performed at the Berkeley Community Center in 1970. As ever, the live rendition of ‘Red House’ is stunning while ‘Voodoo Child’ is a textbook performance – the perfect blend of experimentation kept on a short leash, even though it’s a suitably extended version with a superb vocal track. It’s not all established material that Hendrix offers here – we also get to witness early versions of songs (notably ‘Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)’ and ‘Straight Ahead’ – here in the guise of ‘Pass It On’) that would go on to be featured on other posthumous releases.

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THE ATLANTA INTERNATIONAL POP FESTIVAL – JULY 4th, 1970

Many of Hendrix’s greatest live shows came in outdoor spaces, like this one at the Atlanta Pop Festival on Independence Day in 1970. In many ways, this Georgia gathering was the spiritual sequel to Woodstock that the fiasco in Altamont failed to be. Like Woodstock, it was billed as “three days of peace, love and music,” and you needed a ticket to enter. And just like in upstate New York, the deluge of 300,000-500,000 people crying out slogans like “music belongs to the people” forced the organizers to open the gates and let everyone in completely free of charge.

For his part, Hendrix actually delivered a set that was far more cohesive and tight than he had given the summer before, albeit without any of the iconic highlights. A rare performance of “Room Full of Mirrors” is a real gem from this show as is the extended “Red House” jam.

 

THE ISLE OF WIGHT FESTIVAL, AUGUST 31st, 1970

“Blue Wild Angel: Live at the Isle of Wight” is a posthumous live album by Jimi Hendrix released on November 12th, 2002. The album documents Hendrix’s last U.K. live performance at the Isle of Wight Festival on August 31st, 1970, just three weeks before his death. The set list for the concert contained songs from the original Experience albums, as well as new songs. Some were previously available on Isle of Wight (1971) and Live Isle of Wight ’70 (1991).

Included in the set was an adaptation of “God Save the Queen” and a cover of The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”, played just before launching into “Spanish Castle Magic”. The 22-minute version of “Machine Gun” includes walkie-talkie interference from security personnel feeding through the sound equipment. Apparently there were all sorts of issues with the organisation of the festival, and there were equipment problems, In some ways it’s a bit of a disappointing finale to his career, he’s seems a little tired or to be just going through the motions on much of this, maybe he was just getting tired of the band screaming out for Fire and Wild Thing, but at times the playing is as sublime as ever, and it’s interesting to see how the band with Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell continues to expand their style. Billy Cox makes the ensemble work much better than Noel Redding ever did, a fine example being where Hendrix sits out for some time on what is easily the longest of my 20 versions of Foxy Lady. The full set is available on this album “Blue Wild Angel: Live at The Isle of Wight” and I’m not sure why they didn’t release a double album first time around. The single release album is necessarily not even the best selection of songs from the gig so I’d recommend getting Blue Wild Angel instead. This isn’t his finest performance, but they’re all unique, so if you haven’t heard it, and you’re a Hendrixphile, you need to.

The CD set is more complete than the DVD release as it contains “Midnight Lightning”, “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)”, and “Hey Joe”, three songs that were omitted from the DVD. There was also a “highlights” album released as a single disc, which contained eleven songs – nine from disc one and two from disc two. It was re-released in 2003 as a three-disc “Deluxe Sound & Vision Edition” in a special box and slip cover format as part of Experience Hendrix’s plan to re-release most of Jimi Hendrix’s recorded material.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live At The Isle Of Fehmarn

LIVE AT THE ISE OF FEHMARN September 6th 1970

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live At The Isle Of Fehmarn marks the eighth release in Dagger Records’ popular bootleg-style recording series. This historically significant album features The Jimi Hendrix Experience’s final live performance on September 6th, 1970 during the Love & Peace Festival held on the Isle Of Fehmarn in Germany.

Originally slated to perform on September 5th, The Experience’s appearance at the festival was delayed by frequent rain storms that plagued the previous days shows. Having just completed a series of six concerts in six days including headlining shows at both the Isle Of Wight (August 30th) and Berlin (September 4th), the extra day of rest would serve the group well.

By the time The Experience took to the stage on September 6th, audience tensions were guarded following a series of fights between German bikers, that had escalated in ferocity, and included the festival Box Office being robbed at gun point and Jimi Hendrix’s own road manager, Gerry Stickells being attacked. Depsite these problems, The Experience delivered an enthusiastic hour-plus performance which saw Jimi lead the trio through a series of songs encompassing all of the different periods of the group’s existence.

Jimi’s Isle Of Fehmarn performance has been widely bootlegged over the last 35 years yet it was never professionally recorded. Amateur recordings made from the audience by fans have served as the only known documentation of this historic concert until now. As the eighth entry in this popular ‘bootleg’ series, Dagger presents a newly discovered recording made by the festival’s promoters. Unbeknownst to Hendrix, the promoters captured the group’s entire performance by feeding two overhead stage microphones into a consumer grade Revox reel-to-reel tape machine located off to the side of the stage. The resulting document, rough hewn and unmixed, is clear and not unlike the amateur
audience recording featured on the initial Dagger offering Live At The Oakland Coliseum.

In addition to “Killing Floor,” Live At The Isle Of Fehmarn also features “Spanish Castle Magic,” “All Along The Watchtower,” “Hey Joe,” “Message To Love,” “Hey Baby (New Rising Sun),” “Foxey Lady,” “Red House,” “Ezy Ryder,” “Freedom,” “Room Full Of Mirrors,” “Purple Haze,” and a particularly memorable rendition of “Voodoo Child (Slight Return).”

Made In Japan Deep Purple

One of the most celebrated live rock albums in history made its big entrance on 6th January 1973. “Made In Japan”, the double live album recorded in the summer of 1972 during the first tour of Japan by Deep Purple, debuted on the UK chart. Its US debut followed on 21st April. The band were well known for their strong stage act, and had privately recorded several shows, or broadcast them on radio, but were unenthusiastic about recording a live album until their Japanese record company decided it would be good for publicity. They insisted on supervising the live production, including using Martin Birch, who had previously collaborated with the band, as engineer, and were not particularly interested in the album’s release, even after recording, the band’s musical skill and structure meant there was sufficient improvisation within the songs to keep things fresh. The tour was successful, with strong media interest and a positive response from fans. there was a demand for bootleg recordings of the band. The most notorious of these was an LP entitled H Bomb, recorded at Achen on 11th July 1970. This success, along with albums from other artists such as the Who’s Live at Leeds and the Rolling Stones’ Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out convinced the band that an official live album would be commercially successful. At the time, Glover told Sounds magazine that “there are so many bootlegs of us going around, if we put out our own live set, it should kill their market.

The album featured only seven tracks across the four sides of the original vinyl release, four of them taped at their show at the Festival Hall in Osaka on 16th August; one at the same venue the night before; and the other two at probably the best-known venue in those early days of Western bands exploring that market, Tokyo’s Budokan.

In just the seven cuts, Deep Purple deliver four sides of excitement and indulgence. From Ian Paice’s dizzying drum solo during “The Mule” to Jon Lord’s winking organ vamp at the start of “Lazy,” from the trick ending of the 20-minute “Space Truckin'” to Ian Gillan and Ritchie Blackmore’s voice-and-guitar duel during “Strange Kind of Women,” the metal progenitors plunder (and arguably establish) a near-complete arsenal of onstage tricks and tropes. Cheaply made, wildly popular and frequently reissued, Made in Japan was captured during the three nights in Osaka and Tokyo. The set feels ever casual, as if the band is performing less for the crowd or the tape machine and more for the sheer enjoyment of stretching these tunes out like playdates. “We were all so unconcerned about the whole thing that nobody was actually aware of being recorded,” Lord later confirmed in Dave Thompson’s book Smoke on the Water. “There was no diminution of the interplay, spontaneity and feeling that we usually got onstage.

This was already Purple’s second live album, but a very different animal to their first, the 1969 recording of Jon Lord’s Concerto For Group and Orchestra. This time, chiefly at the request of their Japanese label, the idea was to create a record of the band’s powerful live show. It was also a chance to present an in concert version of the band’s anthem-in-the-making from the Machine Head album of only a few months earlier, ‘Smoke On The Water.’

Included on Made in Japan in live form are three more songs from Machine Head, which had been on the UK charts for 24 weeks after its April 1972 debut. The live set’s opening ‘Highway Star’ was another new Purple favourite, while ‘Lazy,’ a seven-minute track on Machine Head, extended to nearly 11 tracks on the live record. The closer, taking up the whole of side four of the vinyl release, was ‘Space Truckin,’’ which expanded from a four-minute original to an epic of nearly 20 minutes on Made In Japan.

The band considered the gig at Tokyo on 17th August to be the best of the tour. Glover remembered “twelve or thirteen thousand Japanese kids were singing along to ‘Child in Time'” and considered it a career highlight, as did Gillan. Lord listed it as his favourite Deep Purple album, saying, “The band was at the height of its powers. That album was the epitome of what we stood for in those days. At the venue, a row of bodyguards manned the front of the stage. When Blackmore smashed his guitar during the end of “Space Truckin'” and threw it into the audience, several of them clambered past fans to try and retrieve it. Blackmore was annoyed, but the rest of the band found the incident amusing. The gig was not as well recorded as the Osaka shows, though “The Mule” and “Lazy” were considered of sufficient quality to make the final release.

Deep Purple were on a hot streak in which both Machine Head and its predecessor Fireball had topped the British chart, but as often with live albums, there was less chart glory to be had this time. The album debuted in the UK that first week of 1973. “Made in Japan is Deep Purple’s definitive metal monster, a spark-filled execution,” wrote Rolling Stone. Deep Purple can still cut the mustard in concert.

The 8-track tapes of the three shows were carefully put in storage by Warner Bros. Japan for future use. For the album’s 21st anniversary in 1993, Deep Purple author and archivist Simon Robinson decided to enquire via the band’s management if the tapes could be located. He discovered the entire show had been recorded well, including all the encores. In July, Robinson and Darron Goodwin remixed the tapes at Abbey Road Studios for an expanded edition, that was then mastered by Peter Mew in September. To compromise between including as much of the shows as possible and setting a realistic price that most fans would accept, they decided to release a 3-CD box set, titled “Live in Japan”. This included all of the three main shows except for two tracks already available on the original album. In their place were two previously unreleased encores.

Robinson subsequently oversaw a new reissue of the original album in 1998 on CD, The colour scheme of the cover was reversed to show gold text on a black background. The remastered Made in Japan has further edits to make a contiguous performance, making it shorter than the original release. At the same time, a limited edition of 4,000 double LPs was released on purple vinyl, while in Spain,

In 2014,Universal Music announced that the album would be reissued in a number of formats in May. The deluxe option is a set of four CDs or 9 LPs containing a new remix of the three concerts in full, a DVD containing previously unseen video footage, a hardback book and other memorabilia. The original LP was reissued in 180g vinyl as per the original release with the original 1972.

Deep Purple
  • Ritchie Blackmore – lead guitar
  • Ian Gillan – vocals, harmonica (uncredited), percussion (uncredited)
  • Roger Glover – bass
  • Jon Lord – organ, piano
  • Ian Paice – drums

laurajanegrace-audiotree-farout-8.jpg

Laura Jane Grace is an activist, author and musician best known as frontwoman of the iconic Florida punk band Against Me!. Grace set that project aside in 2016 to focus on a solo endeavor dubbed Laura Jane Grace & the Devouring Mothers. The Bloodshot Records signee has a more intimate, singer-songwriter feel yet maintains LJG’s signature howl and kinetic punk energy. Watch Laura Jane Grace & the Devouring Mothers live performance at Lizard’s Liquid Lounge.

Band Members
Laura Jane Grace – Vocals and Guitar
Atom Willard – Drums
Marc Jacob Hudson – Bass

Lvy524

More stunning live material to come out of the vaults...Ian Curtis, Peter Hook and company recorded this live at the legendary Les Bains Douches in Paris on December 18th, 1979. Containing great versions of Love Will Tear Us Apart, Shadowplay, Atmosphere, Transmission, and more, this is one of the most classic live sets of the group’s storied career.

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In January of 1980 Joy Division kicked off a tour of The Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany with a show at the legendary Paradiso Club in Amsterdam. Little did anyone know that in less than 6 months, Ian Curtis would be dead, and the brief, brilliant run of the group would be over. This is a particularly heavy and deep set, with the band performing at their angular best, and Curtis in top form vocally. Essential live broadcast for any fan of Joy Division.

If you are not already acquainted with this gig at Paradiso in Amsterdam in 1980. Here’s some info from a blog. “The local support didn’t want to play so Joy Division stood in for them. They played two completely different sets for the price of one.” And how it was described in a fanzine at the time: ‘When I arrived at the Paradiso, it appeared that most of the regular visitors had decided to stay at home.

So the JOY DIVISION played for a handful of people only, two long sets, together around 70 minutes of excellent music. At that time only the first album and two singles had been released, so they played a lot of new songs that went down well with the small audience. The gig was (along with the PIL-gig in Bruxelles) the best I have ever seen. Fantastic bass playing by Peter Hook and a strained Ian Curtis.  The Paradiso management had lowered the ceiling to make things more intimate. It was a good idea. Shame to all the people who stayed at home’ SJC This is the most bootlegged live Joy Division show, but I’m not sure any of the bootlegs have sound this good. If they do, I certainly want to snag a copy.

Check the intensity on the live versions of tracks like “Transmission,” “Digital,” and “Disorder,” plus “A Means To An End,” “These Days,” and the timeless “Love Will Tear Us Apart.” 

The British group Joy Division wrote and recorded 43 songs and played over 120 shows in just 29 months between 1978 and 1980.

We’re releasing The Sky is a Blank Screen, a live album compiled from last year’s tours for “Jet Plane and Oxbow”.

The hour-plus album catches the excellent lineup of me, Emily Lee, Lucas Oswald, Sadie Powers, and Josh Halpern smashing our way through extended, sometimes off-the-rails versions of songs from JPOB in front of audiences in Seattle and London.

It also features other live performances not before an audience, including a spare, reworked “Radio Silence” broadcast on Austin’s KUTX, a demo of “Only Child” from my apartment, a cover of Bauhaus’ “Kick in the Eye” (recorded for the Onion’s AV Club on the same day as our cover of Bowie’s Lodger album), a reinvented “Rooks”, and “You As You Were” from Animal Joy.

Purchases of the complete album also include a bonus live cover of David Bowie’s “Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)”, which seemed like a new national anthem at the end of 2016—a year that made Jet Plane‘s preoccupation with national myth-making seem uncomfortably prescient.

The Sky is a Blank Screen is available for streaming and download in a variety of formats (including WAV and FLAC); it was mixed by Lucas Oswald and mastered by Max Lorenzen in Austin.

We’ve also put together a limited-time bundle of all the SW-approved live albums, including:

– the live premiere of Rook,
– a seaside show in France from the Golden Archipelago tour,
– excerpts from the 3-hour Island Arc Live extravaganza, and
– the incandescent rock of the Jet Plane and Oxbow tour

In keeping with the themes of Jet Plane and Oxbow, 10% of the proceeds from both the record and the bundle will benefit the Equal Justice Initiative and Earthjustice. (The EJI works for reform of our overburdened, unfair and inhumane criminal justice system; Earthjustice works to protect our environment through legal action in the court.) Since the end of the Jet Plane and Oxbow tour, the live band’s been scattered to the winds, but we’ve all been busy with a wild variety of projects:

Lucas is releasing his second solo album, and recently toured in our pal Jesca Hoop’s band along with JPOB producer/engineer Danny Reisch. Emily has been doing freelance music supervision for film and TV (hire her!) when she’s not playing with metal bands and recording a new full-length with Snake Oil.

Sadie‘s been recording some very beautiful and eerie ambient music with her band Triptychs

And Josh has been playing drums all day, every day with Marmalakes and a bewildering array of other bands in Austin and around the country. You can see him on tour with The Dan Ryan.

As for me, Josh Halpern I’ve been trying to finish my book, The Feathered People, by the end of the year.

For those of you who haven’t heard me blabbing about it, it’s a book that doesn’t have much to do with music; it’s a long, wild travel/natural history yarn about a set of bizarre South American birds of prey called caracaras, the people who live with them, and what they can tell us about the unlikely history of their continent and the evolution of a mind like ours on another branch of the tree of life.

All my field research is done at last—I wrapped it up with an epic trip to Chile earlier in the year, where I helped paleontologists find dinosaur bones and nearly froze looking for flamingos and caracaras in the high Andes. Only the typing is left, and I’ve still got about half the manuscript left to go.

But I also haven’t left music behind. There’s a really exciting opportunity coming up for SW (+ old and new friends and allies) next year that I can’t tell you about yet (!!); but it’ll flip your lid, especially if you enjoyed our Lodger project.

Also, I’ve just finished up a new full-length album that Sub Pop will be releasing next year. All I can say about that one right now is that it’s not a Shearwater album; but I worked on it with some very gifted collaborators for over a year, and I can’t wait to release it.

Lastly, I’m writing this letter from DC, which I’ve visited several times this year for some epic and inspiring protests—but this time I was here at the American Film Institute’s documentary festival AFIDOCS, where Shivani, a short film for which I wrote and performed the score along with Dan and Emily from Cross Record, was shown as an official selection.

Shivani tells the story of a very special three-year-old girl in southern India with an unusual talent, a captivating face, and a surprising family history. So there’s plenty going on—though of course I miss performing. When I’ve turned in my manuscript, I’ll be itching to get out and play again, and to start thinking about another SW album.

More soon. But in the meantime, all best to you and yours.

JM/SW

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Neil Young announced his plan to release “Songs for Judy”, a live album drawn from his November 1976 U.S. tour. The 22-song LP includes solo acoustic performances of all-time classics like “Heart of Gold,” “After the Gold Rush” and “The Needle and the Damage Done” along with a number of rarer selections, including one song, “No One Seems to Know,” that has not appeared on any previous official release.

Neil Young spent the majority of 1976 on the road with Crazy Horse or on the ill-fated Stills-Young Band tour, which he famously dropped out of midway through that summer. He also found time to make “Hitchhiker”, the lost solo acoustic studio album that he recorded in the August 1976 — three months before the shows documented on Songs for Judy but kept in the vault until last fall. At the November 1976 shows featured on “Songs for Judy”, Young performed a solo acoustic opening set before returning to the stage for a harder-rocking performance with Crazy Horse. These shows have been widely praised and discussed by Young fans for years, but this is their first official release.

Young released “Campaigner,” the first single from the album, Recorded at his November 22nd, 1976 show at Boston’s Music Hall, it’s a pristine performance of the politically puzzling ballad (“Even Richard Nixon has got soul”), which would see its first release the following year on his three-LP greatest hits set Decade.

“The tour had been so satisfying, and so different from all that rock would become in the ensuing years, something indelible was captured in our humble collection,” explains Cameron Crowe, who curated the compilation together with Joel Bernstein. “Listening to it today is a little like discovering postcards from home. It was a precious time in Neil Young’s journey, a breath of oxygen in between some of his biggest adventures.”

Songs for Judy is out November 30th on CD and digital platforms, and December 14th on vinyl.

Songs for Judy Track List (all dates are from 1976)

“Songs For Judy Intro” – Atlanta, GA – Nov 24 (late show)
“Too Far Gone” – Boulder, Colorado – Nov 06
“No One Seems To Know” – Boulder, Colorado – Nov 07
“Heart Of Gold” – Fort Worth, Texas – Nov 10
“White Line” – Fort Worth, Texas – Nov 10
“Love Is A Rose” – Houston – Nov 11
“After The Gold Rush” – Houston – Nov 11
“Human Highway” – Madison, Wisconsin – Nov 14
“Tell Me Why” – Chicago – Nov 15 (late show)
“Mr. Soul” – New York – Nov 20 (early show)
“Mellow My Mind” – New York – Nov 20 (early show)
“Give Me Strength” – New York – Nov 20 (late show)
“A Man Needs A Maid” – New York – Nov 20 (late show)
“Roll Another Number” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Journey Through The Past” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Harvest” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Campaigner” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Old Laughing Lady” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (early show)
“The Losing End” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)
“Here We Are In The Years” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)
“The Needle And The Damage Done” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (early show)
“Pocahontas” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)
“Sugar Mountain” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)

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Fat White Family are getting ready for a return. Fat White Family are on the return they play a couple of warm up shows before the festival run to announce, The band will be dropping a few tunes from the new LP. Theyre only small venues so be swift be safe..

To mark the occasion, the band hit the stage of Hebden Bridge Trades Club to prepare with a warm-up show. With a new LP on the way, a new tour which has been entitled ‘Tour Of Discipline’ Fat Whites played a couple of new tracks and rolled out some of the fan favourites.

With Saul Adamczewski seemingly back in the band after previous in-band issues, Fat Whites look healthier and happier and well and truly in the mood to make a mess of countless venues across the country.

While we all need to wait patiently for new material, here’s some live footage of their recent show in Hebden Bridge:

“Touch The Leather” – Live at Hebden Bridge Trades Club