Posts Tagged ‘Live’

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Laura Jane Grace is an activist, author and musician best known as frontwoman of the iconic Florida punk band Against Me!. Grace set that project aside in 2016 to focus on a solo endeavor dubbed Laura Jane Grace & the Devouring Mothers. The Bloodshot Records signee has a more intimate, singer-songwriter feel yet maintains LJG’s signature howl and kinetic punk energy. Watch Laura Jane Grace & the Devouring Mothers live performance at Lizard’s Liquid Lounge.

Band Members
Laura Jane Grace – Vocals and Guitar
Atom Willard – Drums
Marc Jacob Hudson – Bass

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More stunning live material to come out of the vaults...Ian Curtis, Peter Hook and company recorded this live at the legendary Les Bains Douches in Paris on December 18th, 1979. Containing great versions of Love Will Tear Us Apart, Shadowplay, Atmosphere, Transmission, and more, this is one of the most classic live sets of the group’s storied career.

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In January of 1980 Joy Division kicked off a tour of The Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany with a show at the legendary Paradiso Club in Amsterdam. Little did anyone know that in less than 6 months, Ian Curtis would be dead, and the brief, brilliant run of the group would be over. This is a particularly heavy and deep set, with the band performing at their angular best, and Curtis in top form vocally. Essential live broadcast for any fan of Joy Division.

If you are not already acquainted with this gig at Paradiso in Amsterdam in 1980. Here’s some info from a blog. “The local support didn’t want to play so Joy Division stood in for them. They played two completely different sets for the price of one.” And how it was described in a fanzine at the time: ‘When I arrived at the Paradiso, it appeared that most of the regular visitors had decided to stay at home.

So the JOY DIVISION played for a handful of people only, two long sets, together around 70 minutes of excellent music. At that time only the first album and two singles had been released, so they played a lot of new songs that went down well with the small audience. The gig was (along with the PIL-gig in Bruxelles) the best I have ever seen. Fantastic bass playing by Peter Hook and a strained Ian Curtis.  The Paradiso management had lowered the ceiling to make things more intimate. It was a good idea. Shame to all the people who stayed at home’ SJC This is the most bootlegged live Joy Division show, but I’m not sure any of the bootlegs have sound this good. If they do, I certainly want to snag a copy.

Check the intensity on the live versions of tracks like “Transmission,” “Digital,” and “Disorder,” plus “A Means To An End,” “These Days,” and the timeless “Love Will Tear Us Apart.” 

The British group Joy Division wrote and recorded 43 songs and played over 120 shows in just 29 months between 1978 and 1980.

We’re releasing The Sky is a Blank Screen, a live album compiled from last year’s tours for “Jet Plane and Oxbow”.

The hour-plus album catches the excellent lineup of me, Emily Lee, Lucas Oswald, Sadie Powers, and Josh Halpern smashing our way through extended, sometimes off-the-rails versions of songs from JPOB in front of audiences in Seattle and London.

It also features other live performances not before an audience, including a spare, reworked “Radio Silence” broadcast on Austin’s KUTX, a demo of “Only Child” from my apartment, a cover of Bauhaus’ “Kick in the Eye” (recorded for the Onion’s AV Club on the same day as our cover of Bowie’s Lodger album), a reinvented “Rooks”, and “You As You Were” from Animal Joy.

Purchases of the complete album also include a bonus live cover of David Bowie’s “Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)”, which seemed like a new national anthem at the end of 2016—a year that made Jet Plane‘s preoccupation with national myth-making seem uncomfortably prescient.

The Sky is a Blank Screen is available for streaming and download in a variety of formats (including WAV and FLAC); it was mixed by Lucas Oswald and mastered by Max Lorenzen in Austin.

We’ve also put together a limited-time bundle of all the SW-approved live albums, including:

– the live premiere of Rook,
– a seaside show in France from the Golden Archipelago tour,
– excerpts from the 3-hour Island Arc Live extravaganza, and
– the incandescent rock of the Jet Plane and Oxbow tour

In keeping with the themes of Jet Plane and Oxbow, 10% of the proceeds from both the record and the bundle will benefit the Equal Justice Initiative and Earthjustice. (The EJI works for reform of our overburdened, unfair and inhumane criminal justice system; Earthjustice works to protect our environment through legal action in the court.) Since the end of the Jet Plane and Oxbow tour, the live band’s been scattered to the winds, but we’ve all been busy with a wild variety of projects:

Lucas is releasing his second solo album, and recently toured in our pal Jesca Hoop’s band along with JPOB producer/engineer Danny Reisch. Emily has been doing freelance music supervision for film and TV (hire her!) when she’s not playing with metal bands and recording a new full-length with Snake Oil.

Sadie‘s been recording some very beautiful and eerie ambient music with her band Triptychs

And Josh has been playing drums all day, every day with Marmalakes and a bewildering array of other bands in Austin and around the country. You can see him on tour with The Dan Ryan.

As for me, Josh Halpern I’ve been trying to finish my book, The Feathered People, by the end of the year.

For those of you who haven’t heard me blabbing about it, it’s a book that doesn’t have much to do with music; it’s a long, wild travel/natural history yarn about a set of bizarre South American birds of prey called caracaras, the people who live with them, and what they can tell us about the unlikely history of their continent and the evolution of a mind like ours on another branch of the tree of life.

All my field research is done at last—I wrapped it up with an epic trip to Chile earlier in the year, where I helped paleontologists find dinosaur bones and nearly froze looking for flamingos and caracaras in the high Andes. Only the typing is left, and I’ve still got about half the manuscript left to go.

But I also haven’t left music behind. There’s a really exciting opportunity coming up for SW (+ old and new friends and allies) next year that I can’t tell you about yet (!!); but it’ll flip your lid, especially if you enjoyed our Lodger project.

Also, I’ve just finished up a new full-length album that Sub Pop will be releasing next year. All I can say about that one right now is that it’s not a Shearwater album; but I worked on it with some very gifted collaborators for over a year, and I can’t wait to release it.

Lastly, I’m writing this letter from DC, which I’ve visited several times this year for some epic and inspiring protests—but this time I was here at the American Film Institute’s documentary festival AFIDOCS, where Shivani, a short film for which I wrote and performed the score along with Dan and Emily from Cross Record, was shown as an official selection.

Shivani tells the story of a very special three-year-old girl in southern India with an unusual talent, a captivating face, and a surprising family history. So there’s plenty going on—though of course I miss performing. When I’ve turned in my manuscript, I’ll be itching to get out and play again, and to start thinking about another SW album.

More soon. But in the meantime, all best to you and yours.

JM/SW

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Neil Young announced his plan to release “Songs for Judy”, a live album drawn from his November 1976 U.S. tour. The 22-song LP includes solo acoustic performances of all-time classics like “Heart of Gold,” “After the Gold Rush” and “The Needle and the Damage Done” along with a number of rarer selections, including one song, “No One Seems to Know,” that has not appeared on any previous official release.

Neil Young spent the majority of 1976 on the road with Crazy Horse or on the ill-fated Stills-Young Band tour, which he famously dropped out of midway through that summer. He also found time to make “Hitchhiker”, the lost solo acoustic studio album that he recorded in the August 1976 — three months before the shows documented on Songs for Judy but kept in the vault until last fall. At the November 1976 shows featured on “Songs for Judy”, Young performed a solo acoustic opening set before returning to the stage for a harder-rocking performance with Crazy Horse. These shows have been widely praised and discussed by Young fans for years, but this is their first official release.

Young released “Campaigner,” the first single from the album, Recorded at his November 22nd, 1976 show at Boston’s Music Hall, it’s a pristine performance of the politically puzzling ballad (“Even Richard Nixon has got soul”), which would see its first release the following year on his three-LP greatest hits set Decade.

“The tour had been so satisfying, and so different from all that rock would become in the ensuing years, something indelible was captured in our humble collection,” explains Cameron Crowe, who curated the compilation together with Joel Bernstein. “Listening to it today is a little like discovering postcards from home. It was a precious time in Neil Young’s journey, a breath of oxygen in between some of his biggest adventures.”

Songs for Judy is out November 30th on CD and digital platforms, and December 14th on vinyl.

Songs for Judy Track List (all dates are from 1976)

“Songs For Judy Intro” – Atlanta, GA – Nov 24 (late show)
“Too Far Gone” – Boulder, Colorado – Nov 06
“No One Seems To Know” – Boulder, Colorado – Nov 07
“Heart Of Gold” – Fort Worth, Texas – Nov 10
“White Line” – Fort Worth, Texas – Nov 10
“Love Is A Rose” – Houston – Nov 11
“After The Gold Rush” – Houston – Nov 11
“Human Highway” – Madison, Wisconsin – Nov 14
“Tell Me Why” – Chicago – Nov 15 (late show)
“Mr. Soul” – New York – Nov 20 (early show)
“Mellow My Mind” – New York – Nov 20 (early show)
“Give Me Strength” – New York – Nov 20 (late show)
“A Man Needs A Maid” – New York – Nov 20 (late show)
“Roll Another Number” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Journey Through The Past” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Harvest” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Campaigner” – Boston – Nov 22 (late show)
“Old Laughing Lady” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (early show)
“The Losing End” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)
“Here We Are In The Years” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)
“The Needle And The Damage Done” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (early show)
“Pocahontas” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)
“Sugar Mountain” – Atlanta – Nov 24 (late show)

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Fat White Family are getting ready for a return. Fat White Family are on the return they play a couple of warm up shows before the festival run to announce, The band will be dropping a few tunes from the new LP. Theyre only small venues so be swift be safe..

To mark the occasion, the band hit the stage of Hebden Bridge Trades Club to prepare with a warm-up show. With a new LP on the way, a new tour which has been entitled ‘Tour Of Discipline’ Fat Whites played a couple of new tracks and rolled out some of the fan favourites.

With Saul Adamczewski seemingly back in the band after previous in-band issues, Fat Whites look healthier and happier and well and truly in the mood to make a mess of countless venues across the country.

While we all need to wait patiently for new material, here’s some live footage of their recent show in Hebden Bridge:

“Touch The Leather” – Live at Hebden Bridge Trades Club

There is a definitive strength in the vernacular of The Coathangers‘ songwriting. Anyone who has witnessed their live show would likely confirm the long-ago founded rumor that the band brings the party. But what the band brings to a greater degree, whether performing live or on record, is a beautiful exhaustion: a feeling both empty and full, like at the end of intense physical activity when your body feels melted yet brimming with energy. 

Live at Alex’s Bar, Long Beach CA The Coathangers LIVE out now

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Fucked Up Inside is the first live album ever issued by Spiritualized, it was originally released as a limited edition (1,000) mail order only LP in 1993. Recorded on tour in 1992 while supporting Spritualized’s debut release Lazer Guided Melodies this is the first album to document the power of the band live and has long been an out of print collector’s item since it’s initial release. Includes three songs from Lazer Guided Melodies, two from the future Spiritualized album Pure Phase, plus the Spacemen 3 favourite Walking With Jesus. The live recordings come from the Crest Theatre in San Diego and the Hollywood Palladium in L.A. on the nights of 19th and 21st November 1992 on the North American Rollercoaster tour with the Jesus and Mary Chain and Curve.

Yeah! Re-mastered by John Rivers at Woodbine Studios especially for vinyl release. This is a milky clear coloured heavyweight 180 gram vinyl LP in an embossed and hot foil finished sleeve. Spacemen 3 heads should also check out the ‘Taking Drugs To Make Music..’ coloured vinyl and the Spectrum Record Store Day other releases..

Spiritualized – 06 – Shine A Light (Clear Light/Clear Rush) [live]. From the 1993 live and now out of print album Fucked Up Inside. It was originally available only via mail order, now reissued for Record Store Day 2018.

Jimi Hendrix released only three studio albums and one live LP before he died on September. 18th, 1970, at the age of 27. His legacy is built on that classic trio of records, but it’s grown over the past four decades thanks to dozens of album releases that have been released since his death.

Jimi Hendrix was despite being so enigmatic and galvanizing in front of a live audience, he actually hated being out on the road. In his defense, “the road” in the 1960s was an unforgiving and punishing place to be, especially when plotted out in advance by Hendrix’s manager, Michael Jeffery. One night he and his band, The Experience, would be playing a gym in Santa Barbara, California, and the next night they’d find themselves in an arena in Seattle, Washington. Patently brutal. Then there was the added anxiety of being far away from the recording studio — the place where he felt most at home. To Hendrix, touring was more stress than it was worth. It was just something he had to do to keep the black lights at Electric Lady Studios on.

Jimi Hendrix was only on the scene for about four years of his life, but he absolutely made the most of that time. Amid a vast number of classic, immortal live recordings, he toured incessantly and performed an incredible number of live shows that still have the ability to shock and surprise nearly 50 years on. From the Fillmore East to the Fillmore West, from Woodstock and Monterey to Paris, and London, and everywhere else that he and whatever group was backing him went, the possibility that real magic might present itself .

THE OLYMPIA THEATRE  Paris– OCTOBER 18th, 1966

Some concerts on this list are bound to get a little more shine due to their historic nature, like this gig at the Olympia Theatre in Paris from 1966. This was the first time that The Jimi Hendrix Experience, with Mitch Mitchell on drums and Noel Redding on bass, played together as a group in front of a paying audience — opening for the “French Elvis Presley”, Johnny Hallyday, no less. I suppose we could have put Hendrix’s last known gig at the Isle of Fehmarn on September 6, 1970, or maybe his performance at the Isle of Wight a few weeks earlier, but both of those are kind of shambolic and more than a little morbid. Even though this show was only 15 minutes long, you get a real sense of the kind of fire Hendrix was playing with around the time he first hit the scene. The band’s first single, “Hey Joe”, sounds great, but it’s the Howlin’ Wolf cover “Killing Floor” that will leave your jaw on the floor. (The above video shows Hendrix at the venue one year later.

THE CAFÉ AU GO-GO – MARCH 17th, 1968

One of the great things about going to a live show is the feeling that anything can happen. The patrons of the small Café Au Go-Go Club in New York City couldn’t have known when they ordered their drinks that they were about to witness one of the great, public rock and roll jam sessions of all time that spring night. To be sure, Hendrix was known to play around town while in New York City, but this gig with Elvin Bishop on rhythm guitar, Paul Butterfield on harmonica and vocals, and Buddy Miles on the drums is some next-level stuff. It’s clear from the recording that the guys were just interested in messing around, but there are some real spine-tingling moments to be gleaned here like the pickup group’s all-instrumental rendition of “Little Wing” or the cover of T-Bone Walker’s “Stormy Monday.”

THE ATLANTA INTERNATIONAL POP FESTIVAL – JULY 4th, 1970

Many of Hendrix’s greatest live shows came in outdoor spaces, like this one at the Atlanta Pop Festival on Independence Day in 1970. In many ways, this Georgia gathering was the spiritual sequel to Woodstock that the fiasco in Altamont failed to be. Like Woodstock, it was billed as “three days of peace, love and music,” and you needed a ticket to enter. And just like in upstate New York, the deluge of 300,000-500,000 people crying out slogans like “music belongs to the people” forced the organizers to open the gates and let everyone in completely free of charge. For his part, Hendrix actually delivered a set that was far more cohesive and tight than he had given the summer before, albeit without any of the iconic highlights. A rare performance of “Room Full of Mirrors” is a real gem from this show as is the extended “Red House” jam.

BERKELEY COMMUNITY THEATRE – MAY 30th, 1970

Loose is the operative word when it comes to describing this concert, which took place just outside the confines of the University of California. In the context in which it was performed, it’s actually an interesting contrast to the mania of the anti-Vietnam War demonstrations that were taking place right outside the venue. In his own way, Hendrix addresses the tension permeating the atmosphere in his intro to “The Star-Spangled Banner” when he asks the crowd to get on their feet and stand for the national anthem, reminding them that “we’re all Americans.” For their troubles, he then proceeds to knock them down back on their asses with seismic versions of “Purple Haze” and “Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)”. For real music nerds, it should be noted that this show was one of the very few instances in his career when Hendrix didn’t tune his guitar down a half step and instead played this entire gig in standard tuning.

THE FILLMORE EAST – JANUARY 1st, 1970

The one and only performance of the short-lived Band of Gypsys came at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East. The only reason this project came to fruition in the first place was due to a legal settlement between Hendrix and Ed Chalpin of PPX Recordings, whereby the latter would receive total rights to one release by the former. It was a messy situation all around and one that Hendrix wasn’t about to resolve by giving Chalpin the tapes that would make up Electric Ladyland, so instead he enlisted his old Army buddy Billy Cox to play bass and Buddy Miles of Electric Flag to play drums for a special live album project. It’s hard to say that Band of Gypsys was superior to the Experience, but this show isn’t without its merits. “Them Changes” with Miles on lead vocals is funky and fun in a way that Hendrix rarely was while performing live, but it’s the song “Machine Gun” that takes the cake. At a runtime of 12:40, it’s by no means succinct, but with that signature, simulated-gunfire riff and wandering, adventurous solos, it’s one of the most thrilling tracks in Hendrix’s canon.

THE L.A. FORUM – APRIL 25th, 1970

There’s something about the sunny confines of the Forum in Inglewood, California, that brought out the best in a myriad of ‘60s and ‘70s rock bands, and Hendrix was no exception. This was the first live show that Hendrix played after his foray with the Band of Gypsys and the first in seven months with Mitch Mitchell back on the skins. Hendrix sounds completely re-energized and hits the SoCal crowd with a number of heavy-hitting tracks, including one of the first performances of “Ezy Rider” and “Freedom”, which both sound incredible. The cherry of this gig, however, is the sultry and bombastic “Foxey Lady”, which, per usual, was dedicated to one of the finer specimens of the opposite sex that the guitarist spotted in the crowd.

WOODSTOCK – AUGUST 18th, 1969

You probably assumed that this show would top this list or maybe place second, but one transcendent moment does not a complete concert make. Hendrix’s performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at Woodstock will forever stand as one of the defining moments of the ‘60s, but the rest of the show around that singular – and notably solo – rendition of the American national anthem is somewhat shambolic. For this gig, Hendrix brought together his regular drummer, Mitch Mitchell, and his Army buddy and Band of Gypsys bassist, Buddy Cox, but also an overstuffed array of world musicians who clearly weren’t ready to tackle this material. That this was also the longest performance of Hendrix’s career actually doesn’t help its case as one might assume either. It’s not a complete disaster, however, as both “Woodstock Improvisation” and “Hey Joe” are undeniably fantastic.

THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL – FEBRUARY 24th, 1969

It was one of Hendrix manager Michael Jeffrey’s more canny moves that this gig was even booked in the first place. Originally, he and the Experience were only supposed to perform at the Royal Albert Hall for one night on February 18th, which was due to be recorded for a potential live album, but Jeffrey was worried that the band wouldn’t make the grade. His concern proved correct as both Redding and Mitchell sounded utterly lethargic at that show. The band only had one more shot to make up for their lackluster performance, thus this gig a week later where they absolutely killed. Hendrix clearly knew that he and the band were on fire and actually went back on at the end of the night for a positively rare encore of the exceedingly rarely played “Room Full of Mirrors”. This ended up being the last show that the Experience would ever play together in Europe.

THE MONTEREY POP FESTIVAL – JUNE 18th, 1967

When Jimi Hendrix left New York City for the UK in 1966, hardly anyone in his home country even noticed. When he came back on June 18, 1967, for the Monterey Pop Festival in northern California, they could hardly tear their eyes away. As opposed to Woodstock where one song transcended the rest of the Hendrix’s set, at Monterey, the guitarist’s violent, sexually charged rendition of The Troggs’ “Wild Thing” was a culmination. Seemingly intent on topping The Who’s explosive performance of “My Generation” that preceded him, when it came to ending his own showing, Hendrix pulled out all the stops. Even watching now, the display of him grinding his custom-painted Stratocaster against the stack of Marshall amps before throwing it down to the ground and riding it like a familiar love is shocking to behold. Then comes the lighter fluid; and then the match and then the flames. At Monterey, Hendrix threw down the gauntlet to his generation of fellow artists: Either become daring, or remain irrelevant.

THE WINTERLAND BALLROOM – OCTOBER 11th, 1968

Burning guitars and rockets red-glaring aside, this show, the second in a run of three dates in San Francisco, was the absolute peak of Jimi Hendrix’s live performance career. Throughout its history, the Winterland Ballroom was a venue that brought the best out of those who performed there, whether it was Led Zeppelin in 1969, The Band in 1976, or Bruce Springsteen and the Sex Pistols in 1978. Hendrix, already one of the best live acts on the scene at the time, with a tremendously loyal and dedicated following in the Bay Area, brought his pure A-game to the Bill Graham-promoted concert hall.

It’s actually a pretty tall order to pick from which of the three nights from the 10th through the 12th was the best of the bunch. On the first evening, you have a tremendous, electrified version of “Hear My Train a Comin’” to go along with a twisted, psychedelic rendition of “Tax Free”. On the last night, there’s that great cover of Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love” and an explosive “Spanish Castle Magic”. But then you have the second night, and Hendrix gives you perhaps the best version of “Purple Haze” that he ever performed live to go along with a mind-blowing cover of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone”. You can’t go wrong with any of these gigs to be perfectly honest, and taken together, they really are the iconic guitarist at the very top of his game.

“Personality Crisis: Live Recordings & Studio Demos 1972-1975”. A trio of pre-Mercury demo sessions – arguably as close as the Dolls ever got to nailing their sound in the cold austerity of the recording studio – are joined by a collection of incendiary live shows (including two American radio broadcasts)

Formed in 1971 in New York City, and originally classified as hard rock, the New York Dolls became one of the creators of punk rock before there was even a term for it. With a line-up of vocalist David Johansen, guitarist Johnny Thunders, bassist Arthur Kane, guitarist Sylvain Sylvain and drummer Billy Murcia, the New York Dolls sported an androgynous wardrobe of high heels, eccentric hats, make-up and satin onstage, and in the words of the Encyclopedia of Popular Music were “one of the most influential rock bands of the last 20 years”, boasting such high profile fans as Morrissey, the Sex Pistols, The Ramones, Kiss, Guns N’ Roses and The Damned.

It is commonly perceived that the essence of the New York Dolls was never satisfactorily captured by their two albums for the Mercury label, both of which many believe suffered from unsympathetic production. Fortunately for us all, the band’s untutored rawness, unencumbered strength of purpose and unique vision is better served by the recordings that are gathered together for the first time on Personality Crisis: Live Recordings & Studio Demos 1972-1975. A trio of pre-Mercury demo sessions – arguably as close as the Dolls ever got to nailing their sound in the cold austerity of the recording studio – are joined by a collection of incendiary live shows (including two American radio broadcasts) that, despite the variable sound quality, capture their unfettered outrageousness and life-affirming vitality. This package serves, then, as an alternative view of one of the few genuinely essential rock’n’roll bands to emerge from the early Seventies wastelands.

Includes early versions of acknowledged New York Dolls’ classics: ‘Jet Boy’, ‘Trash’, ‘Personality Crisis’, ‘Puss ‘n’ Boots’, ‘Stranded In The Jungle’, ‘Babylon’, ‘Who Are The Mystery Girls’, ‘Bad Girl’ and ‘Pills’.

Come in a beautifully designed clamshell box set containing its own booklet with full sleeve notes, plus individual card wallets for each of the discs. All material contained within this package has been specially remastered for this release.This package serves, then, as an alternative view of one of the few genuinely essential rock’n’roll bands to emerge from the early Seventies wastelands.

Released April 27th, 2018 via Cherry Red Records.

No ’60s concert scene was better documented than the San Francisco explosion . But of the official releases that came out at the time, the one to have is this Jefferson Airplane set, recorded during October ’68 dates at SF’s Fillmore West and a month later at Fillmore East in NYC. Here in that time between Monterey and Woodstock, between the albums “Crown Of Creation” and “Volunteers” , the band was growing daily in confidence, muscle and a knack for making the most of the moment. The constantly shifting dynamic of vocal triad Grace Slick, Marty Balin and Paul Kantner was a nimble beast, but more evident than ever was how much the tandem of guitarist Jorma Kaukonen and bassist Jack Casady formed the beating heart of this band.

Must-hear song: Balin’s “Plastic Fantastic Lover” has fury only hinted at on the Surrealistic Pillow studio version . But the real treasure is the version of folk figure Fred Neil’s written staunch and steely “The Other Side Of This Life” , a live Airplane staple from the early days, but never before seeing official release.

The cheat: Not only was it pieced together from several dates, some of the songs themselves are multi-date spliced jobs.

The live rock album really took flight at the end of the decade with Bay Area bands like The Grateful Dead “Live/ Dead”  Quicksilver Messenger Service  “Happy trails” , Big Brother & the Holding  Company(parts of ’68’s ) Cheap Thrills . It made perfect sense: part of the San Francisco mystique was the live experience, the sense of community and unpredictability, bands being given the space—and the state-of-the-art sound systems to take winding (and long) musical trips. With , a combination of 1968 recordings from the Fillmores East and West on both coasts,

The Airplane

Jefferson Airplane made one of the defining albums of the band’s career, with dynamic vocal interplay among its three singers (Marty Balin, Grace Slick, Paul Kantner), a blues spotlight for guitarist Jorma Kaukonen and Rock Me  , a swirling rendition of Donovan’s “Fat Angel” (“Fly Jefferson Airplane, gets you there on time,” it goes, making this a self-referential self-tribute), and a soaring 3/5 of a Mile In Ten Seconds . The Airplane were a strange amalgam, part post-folk (there’s a terrific take on Fred Neil’s “The Other Side Of Life” on ‘Pointed Little Head’), part psychedelic rock, part electric blues, and it could all get scattered, but when it locked in, they were one of the more mesmeric of the groups who came out of San Francisco scene. If you want to get a sense of what made them, on a good night, so special, you can start here.