Posts Tagged ‘Jimi Hendrix Experience’

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This week we have a superb collection of early material from The Fleet Foxes, including their seminal debut album, a couple EP’s and some well-worth-it B-Sides and outtakes. It’s a hefty swathe of music, and all in a lovely clamshell box affair inc liner notes and booklet.

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J Mascis – Elastic Days

Everyone’s favourite tiny dinosaur is back too, with Mr. Mascis‘ first solo release since 2014’s ‘Tied To A Star’ encompassing aspects of Dinosaur Jr’s rockier moments but imbued with tender folkish acousticry, swooning Americana and soaring rock solos, delivered with the unmistakable gravelly vox we’ve come to know and love from Mr. M. 

Since then, through the reformation of the original Dinosaur Jr lineup in 2005, J has recorded solo albums now and then. And those album, Sings and Chant for AMMA (2005), Several Shades of Why (2011) and Tied to a Star (2014) had all delivered incredible sets of songs presented with a minimum of bombast and a surfeit of cool. Like its predecessors, Elastic Days was recorded at J’s own Bisquiteen studio. Mascis does almost all his own stunts, although Ken Miauri (who also appeared on Tied to a Star) plays keyboards and there are a few guest vocal spots. These include old mates Pall Jenkins (Black Heart Procession), and Mark Mulcahy (Miracle Legion, etc.), as well as the newly added voice of Zoë Randell (Luluc) among others. But the show is mostly J’s and J’s alone. For those expecting the hallucinatory overload of Dinosaur Jr’s live attack, the gentleness of the approach here will draw easy comparisons to Neil Young’s binary approach to working solo versus working with Crazy Horse. This is a lazy man’s shorthand, but it still rings true. Elastic Days brims with great moments. Epic hooks that snare you in surprisingly subtle ways, guitar textures that slide against each other like old lovers, and structures that range from a neo-power-ballad (Web So Dense) to jazzily-canted West Coasty post-psych (Give It Off) to a track that subliminally recalls the keyboard approach of Scott Thurston-era Stooges (Drop Me). The album plays out with a combination of holism and variety that is certain to set many brains ablaze.

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In November 1968, millions of double LPs were shipped to record stores worldwide ahead of that tumultuous year’s most anticipated music event: the November 22nd release of The BEATLES (soon to be better known as ‘The White Album’). With their ninth studio album, The Beatles took the world on a whole new trip, side one blasting off with the exhilarating rush of a screaming jet escorting Paul McCartney’s punchy, exuberant vocals on “Back In The U.S.S.R.” “Dear Prudence” came next, John Lennon warmly beckoning his friend and all of us to “look around.” George Harrison imparted timeless wisdom in “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” singing, “With every mistake we must surely be learning.” Ringo Starr’s “Don’t Pass Me By” marked his first solo songwriting credit on a Beatles album. For 50 years, ‘The White Album’ has invited its listeners to venture forth and explore the breadth and ambition of its music, delighting and inspiring each new generation in turn.

For it’s 50th anniversary, The Beatles release a suite of lavishly presented ‘White Album’ packages. The album’s 30 tracks are newly mixed by producer Giles Martin and mix engineer Sam Okell in stereo and 5.1 surround audio, joined by 27 early acoustic demos and 50 session takes, most of which are previously unreleased in any form.

“We had left Sgt. Pepper’s band to play in his sunny Elysian Fields and were now striding out in new directions without a map,” says Paul McCartney in his written introduction for the new ‘White Album’ releases.

This is the first time The BEATLES (‘White Album’) has been remixed and presented with additional demos and session recordings. The album’s sweeping new edition follows 2017’s universally acclaimed Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band Anniversary Edition releases. To create the new stereo and 5.1 surround audio mixes for ‘The White Album,’ Martin and Okell worked with an expert team of engineers and audio restoration specialists at Abbey Road Studios in London. All the new ‘White Album’ releases include Martin’s new stereo album mix, sourced directly from the original four-track and eight-track session tapes. Martin’s new mix is guided by the album’s original stereo mix produced by his father, George Martin.

“In remixing ‘The White Album,’ we’ve tried to bring you as close as possible to The Beatles in the studio,” explains Giles Martin in his written introduction for the new edition. “We’ve peeled back the layers of the ‘Glass Onion’ with the hope of immersing old and new listeners into one of the most diverse and inspiring albums ever made.”

The minimalist artwork for ‘The White Album’ was created by artist Richard Hamilton, one of Britain’s leading figures in the creation and rise of pop art. The top-loading gatefold sleeve’s stark white exterior had ‘The BEATLES’ embossed on the front and printed on the spine with the album’s catalogue number. Early copies of ‘The White Album’ were also individually numbered on the front, which has also been done for the new edition’s Super Deluxe package. The set’s six CDs and Blu-ray disc are housed in a slipsleeved 164-page hardbound book, with pull-out reproductions of the original album’s four glossy color portrait photographs of John, Paul, George, and Ringo, as well as the album’s large fold-out poster with a photo collage on one side and lyrics on the other. The beautiful book is illustrated with rare photographs, reproductions of handwritten and notated lyrics, previously unpublished photos of recording sheets and tape boxes, and reproduced original ‘White Album’ print ads. The book’s comprehensive written pieces include new introductions by Paul McCartney and Giles Martin, and in-depth chapters covering track-by-track details and session notes reflecting The Beatles’ year between the release of ‘Sgt. Pepper’ and recording sessions for ‘The White Album,’ the band’s July 28 1968 “Mad Day Out” photo shoot in locations around London, the album artwork, the lead-up and execution of the album’s blockbuster release, and its far-ranging influence, written by Beatles historian, author and radio producer Kevin Howlett; journalist and author John Harris; and Tate Britain’s Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Andrew Wilson.

The Deluxe 3CD is presented in an embossed digipak with the fold-out poster and portrait photos, plus a 24-page booklet abridged from the Super Deluxe book. Presented in a lift-top box with a four-page booklet, the limited edition Deluxe 4LP vinyl set presents the 2LP album in a faithful, embossed reproduction of its original gatefold sleeve with the fold-out poster and portrait photos, paired with the 2LP Esher Demos in an embossed gatefold sleeve.

Much of the initial songwriting for ‘The White Album’ was done in Rishikesh, India between February and April 1968, when John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr joined a course at the Maharishi’s Academy of Transcendental Meditation. In a postcard to Ringo, who had returned to England before the others, John wrote, “we’ve got about two L.P.s worth of songs now so get your drums out.”

During the last week of May, The Beatles gathered at George’s house in Esher, Surrey, where they recorded acoustic demos for 27 songs. Known as the Esher Demos, all 27 recordings are included in the new edition’s Deluxe and Super Deluxe packages, sourced from the original four-track tapes. Twenty-one of the demoed songs were recorded during the subsequent studio sessions, and 19 were ultimately finished and included on ‘The White Album.’

The Beatles’ studio sessions for The BEATLES (‘White Album’) began on May 30, 1968 at Abbey Road Studios. In the 20 weeks that followed, The Beatles devoted most of their time to sessions there for the new album, with some recording also done at Trident Studios. The final session for the album took place at Abbey Road on October 16, a 24-hour marathon with producer George Martin to sequence the double album’s four sides and to complete edits and cross-fades between its songs. The Beatles’ approach to recording for ‘The White Album’ was quite different from what they had done for ‘Sgt. Pepper.’ Rather than layering individually overdubbed parts on a multi-track tape, many of the ‘White Album’ session takes were recorded to four-track and eight-track tape as group performances with a live lead vocal. The Beatles often recorded take after take for a song, as evidenced by the Super Deluxe set’s Take 102 for “Not Guilty,” a song that was not included on the album. This live-take recording style resulted in a less intricately structured, more unbridled album that would shift the course of rock music and cut a path for punk and indie rock.

The Beatles’ newly adopted method of recording all through the night was time consuming and exhausting for their producer, George Martin. Martin had other duties, including his management of AIR (Associated Independent Recording), and he had also composed the orchestral score for The Beatles’ animated feature film, Yellow Submarine, released in July 1968. After the first three months of ‘White Album’ sessions, Martin took a three-week holiday from the studio, entrusting the control room to his young assistant Chris Thomas and balance engineer Ken Scott. Scott had taken the place of engineer Geoff Emerick, who left the sessions in mid-July. On August 22, Ringo Starr also left the sessions, returning 11 days later to find his drum kit adorned with flowers from his bandmates. While the sessions’ four and a half months of long hours and many takes did spark occasional friction in the studio, the session recordings reveal the closeness, camaraderie, and collaborative strengths within the band, as well as with George Martin.

The BEATLES (‘White Album’) was the first Beatles album to be released on the group’s own Apple Records label. Issued in both stereo and mono for the U.K. and in stereo for the U.S., the double album was an immediate bestseller, entering the British chart at number one and remaining there for eight of the 22 weeks it was listed. ‘The White Album’ also debuted at number one on the U.S. chart, holding the top spot for nine weeks of its initial 65-week chart run. In his glowing ‘White Album’ review for Rolling Stone, the magazine’s co-founder Jann Wenner declared: “It is the best album they have ever released, and only The Beatles are capable of making a better one.” In the U.S., ‘The White Album’ is 19-times platinum-certified by the RIAA and in 2000, it was inducted into the Recording Academy’s GRAMMY® Hall of Fame, recognizing “recordings of lasting qualitative or historical significance.”

Boygenius

Boygenius  –

Julien Baker, Phoebe Bridgers, and Lucy Dacus formed boygenius after booking a tour together, but the trio had subconsciously been in the works for longer than that. Through a series of tours and performances together, and chance encounters that led to friendships – including Bridgers’ and Dacus’ first in-person meeting backstage at a Philadelphia festival, greenroom hangouts that felt instantly comfortable and compatible, a couple of long email chains and even a secret handshake between Baker and Dacus – the lyrically and musically arresting singer-songwriters and kindred spirits got to know each other on their own terms.

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Fleet Foxes  –  First Collection

First Collection 2006-2009 is a special limited edition collection to mark the 10th year anniversary of Fleet Foxes’ debut album.
The collection comprises content spanning the early days of the group’s career, including the eponymous debut album, as well as the Sun Giant EP, The Fleet Foxes EP, and a compilation of B-sides & Rarities.

Available on limited edition 4-disc vinyl, as well as CD, the release also includes an extensive booklet featuring show flyers, lyrics, and artwork from the period.

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Laura Jane Grace & the Devouring Mothers – Bought to Rot

14 tracks spanning Laura Jane Grace’s fractured relationship with her adopted hometown of Chicago, true friendship, complicated romance, and reconciling everything in the end, Bought to Rot stands as the most musically diverse collection of songs Grace has written to date.
Inspired in large part by Tom Petty’s Full Moon Fever, the first album Grace ever owned, Bought to Rot finds her at the same age Petty was when he created his solo debut masterpiece. In light of his recent passing, Grace was motivated to pay homage to one of her lifelong heroes.

Laura Jane Grace & the Devouring Mothers are Laura Jane Grace, Atom Willard, and Marc Jacob Hudson. Grace is a musician, author, and activist best known as the founder, lead singer, songwriter, and guitarist of the punk rock band Against Me!. Willard, also of Against Me!, is a drummer who has played in iconic punk bands such as Rocket from the Crypt, Social Distortion, and The Offspring. Devouring Mothers bassist Hudson is a recordist and mixer at Rancho Recordo, a recording studio and creative space in the woods of Michigan, and the sound engineer for Against Me

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The Beths  –  Future Me Hates Me

The Beths from New Zealand occupy a warm, energetic sonic space between joyful hooks, sun-soaked harmonies, and acerbic lyrics. Their debut album Future Me Hates Me on Carpark Records, delivers an astonishment of roadtrip-ready pleasures, each song hitting your ears with an exhilarating endorphin rush like the first time you heard The Breeders / Jale / Veruca Salt..

Front and center on these ten infectious tracks is lead singer and primary songwriter Elizabeth Stokes. Stokes has previously worked in other genres within Auckland’s rich and varied music scene, recently playing in a folk outfit, but it was in exploring the angst-ridden sounds of her youth that she found her place. From the irresistible title track to future singles Happy Unhappy and You Wouldn’t Like Me, Stokes commands a vocal range that spans from the brash confidence of Joan Jett to the disarming vulnerability of Jenny Lewis.

Beths guitarist and studio guru Jonathan Pearce (whose other acts as producer include recent Captured Tracks signing, Wax Chattels brings it all home with an approach that’s equal parts seasoned perfectionist and D.I.Y. Channeling their stew of personal-canon heroes while drawing inspiration from contemporaries like Alvvays and Courtney Barnett, The Beths serve up deeply emotional lyrics packaged within heavenly sounds that delight in probing the limits of the pop form. “That’s another New Zealand thing,” Stokes concludes with a laugh. “We’re putting our hearts on our sleeves—and then apologizing for it.” The result is nothing less than one of the standout records of 2018.

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The Wave Pictures -Look Inside Your Heart

The Wave Pictures return with the promised second album of the year, Look Inside Your Heart – a warm, joyous record celebrating friendship, happiness and drunken party times. Like the first album they released this year, the more contemplative Brushes With Happiness, this one was recorded late at night whilst inebriated back at the tiny Booze Cube Studio in Stoke Newington, live to reel-to-reel tape with no computers of any kind. The album is peppered with giggles and chatter, which adds a sense of spontaneity and place.

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Sun Kil Moon – This Is My Dinner

Prolific singer / songwriter Mark Kozelek presents yet another Sun Kil Moon album, focusing less on actual singing and more on storytelling and observation. The 10-track effort follows the chronological journey of Sun Kil Moon’s November 2017 European tour. After the trek, the band set up shop at TAPF Studio in Copenhagen, Denmark before finishing the record at San Francisco, California’s Hyde Street Studios. In addition to eight original numbers, This Is My Dinner includes a cover of AC/DC’s Rock ‘N Roll Singer (featuring Jordan Cook of Reignwolf) and the iconic theme song to The Partridge Family, Come On Get Happy.

Mary Lattimore and Meg Baird  –  Ghost Forests

Musical conversations between Meg Baird (Espers) and Mary Lattimore are intimate, fluid, effortless and spontaneous. They’re filled with the euphoria of creation and, at times, they articulate hard truths and tangled emotions with an ease only trusted friends can manage. The songs alternate between extended ethereal instrumental excursions, gauzy and dreamy pop, blown-out Bull of the Woods heavy haze, and modern re-imaginations of epic traditional balladry all while touching on the strange and otherworldly places between these stations.

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Jimi Hendrix Experience – Electric Ladyland 50th Anniversary Edition

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s 1968 album Electric Ladyland. Electric Ladyland was remastered by Bernie Grundman, who did an analog direct to disc vinyl transfer of the original LP, as well as a new 5.1 surround sound mix of the original album by Hendrix’s original engineer Eddie Kramer. The box set includes Electric Ladyland: The Early Takes with demos, studio outtakes, and more. It also includes the 1997 documentary At Last… The Beginning: The Making of Electric Ladyland on Blu-ray and the unreleased live recording Jimi Hendrix Experience: Live at the Hollywood Bowl 9/14/68. The 50th anniversary reissue arrives with a 48-page book featuring Jimi’s handwritten lyrics, poem, and instructions to his record label Reprise, previously unpublished photos from studio sessions by Kramer, and more. The Deluxe Edition comes with new cover art that features a photo of the band at New York City’s Alice in Wonderland statue by Linda McCartneyHendrix’s personal choice for the album art. Electric Ladyland was Hendrix’s last studio album. It included the iconic tracks Voodoo Child, their cover of Bob Dylan’s All Along the Watchtower, Crosstown Traffic, and others. It was the only Hendrix LP to reach No. 1 on the Billboard chart.

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Dave Kusworth  –  World of Dave Kusworth Vol 1 and 2

Career spanning anthology from 1983-2018, includes newly remastered classic tracks from The Jacobites, The Bounty Hunters, The Tenderhooks and The Dave Kusworth Group as well as solo material including a track from the as yet, unreleased new album 22b.The very first time a ‘Best Of ‘has been committed to vinyl. Compiled by Dave himself and designed by long standing designer Dave Twist.

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Alela Diane – The Pirate’s Gospel (Deluxe Edition)

An Album Of The Year when it was first released and it is still an Essential listen. Now with a swanky remastered edition of Alela Diane’s first mythical album including 10 bonus tracks. 2006’s The Pirate’s Gospel was the debut release from singer and songwriter Alela Diane. Hailing from the deep woods and winding rivers of Northern California Gold Rush town Nevada City, Alela grew up singing songs with her parents (both musicians). During a stay in San Francisco in 2003, she began teaching herself guitar and writing her first songs, blending tense, trance-like arpeggios, with warm, thick vocals and meditative lyrics about family and nature. Written in response to a loss of home and familiarity, The Pirate’s Gospel is a powerful document of personal re-evaluation and renewal set against the backdrop of generations past and future, mothers and fathers, life, death, and birth.

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Jethro Tull – This Was – The 50th Anniversary Edition

After several name changes, Jethro Tull played its first show as Jethro Tull in February 1968. Months later, Ian Anderson, Mick Abrahams, Glenn Cornick and Clive Bunker released the band’s debut – This Was. The album debuted at number 10 on the U.K. album chart, but more important, it was the first step in a 50-year (and counting) journey that made Jethro Tull one of the world’s most successful progressive rock bands. To celebrate the album’s 50th anniversary, a special deluxe edition

Recorded during the summer of 1968, This Was is the only Jethro Tull album to feature guitarist Mick Abrahams, who left the group shortly after the album came out to form Blodwyn Pig. The title of the album refers to the band moving away from its early blues-based sound, which was referenced in the original liner notes: “This was how we were playing then – but things change – don’t they?” The album includes songs that have been in and out of Jethro Tull’s live show for 50 years, like My Sunday Feeling and Beggar’s Farm. Also featured are several bonus tracks: Love Story, A Christmas Song. Sunshine Day and Aeroplane. In 1968, BBC Radio featured the band twice on its award-winning program, “BBC Top Gear Session.” Both of those performances – nine songs in total – are featured on the second disc, including live versions of Serenade To A Cuckoo, Love Story and My Sunday Feeling. Rounding out the disc are b-sides, outtakes, radio advertisements, and an unreleased mono mix of Someday The Sun Won’t Shine For You(Faster Version). The final CD features the album’s original U.K. stereo mix and its original mono mix.

The DVD features the original album and bonus tracks remixed by Steven Wilson in 4.1 DTS and AC3 Dolby Digital surround and 96/24 LPCM stereo. There are also 5.1 surround versions of Love Story and A Christmas Song. Also included in 96/24 LPCM stereo is the 1969 stereo mix that was released in the U.S.

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Jimi Hendrix

The Jimi Hendrix Experience’s Electric Ladyland is being reissued with a massive 50th anniversary deluxe box set. Due on November. 9th, the album will be available as either a three-CD/Blu-ray set or a six-LP/Blu-ray set.

Both packages include the original double album, which has been newly remastered from the original analog tapes. The vinyl set features an all-analog direct-to-disc vinyl transfer. Among the set’s other highlights are Electric Ladyland: The Early Takes, which features demos and studio outtakes from the era; an expanded documentary on the making of Electric Ladyland; a book containing handwritten lyrics and unseen photos; Live at the Hollywood Bowl 14/9/68, a recently discovered two-track soundboard recording that’s part of Experience Hendrix’s Dagger Records official bootleg series; the feature-length documentary At Last … the Beginning: The Making of ‘Electric Ladyland’; and a new 5.1 surround sound mix of the album by original Hendrix engineer Eddie Kramer.

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Initially released on October. 16th, 1968, this was the third album by the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the first produced by Hendrix himself and the last studio effort to arrive during his lifetime. Signature tracks include “Voodoo Child (Slight Return),” “Crosstown Traffic” and his definitive cover of Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower.”

“Electric Ladyland is a complete work. He pushed the limit musically; it went in different directions,” Kramer says in the video preview below. “It’s a body of work that Jimi was in control of right from the beginning. This is the definitive album that Jimi created.”

This never-before-released 1968 performance at the Hollywood Bowl “captures the band and the mounting excitement that took place just weeks before the release of Electric Ladyland,” according to pre-release materials.

The late Linda Eastman (McCartney) took the updated cover art, which finds the Jimi Hendrix Experience and a group children at the statue of Alice in Wonderland in New York’s Central Park. This was actually Hendrix’s choice for the album cover image, though it was later relegated to the inside of the U.S. version. The U.K. edition infamously featured a gatefold photo of 19 naked women instead, a decision Hendrix never agreed with.

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This period found Hendrix expanding his musical sphere with a series of collaborators as his relationship with Experience bassist Noel Redding deteriorated. Jefferson Airplane’s Jack Casady played bass on “Voodoo Chile,” while Hendrix took over on many of the other tracks – including “All Along the Watchtower.” Other guest stars on Electric Ladyland include Steve Winwood, Chris Wood and Dave Mason of Traffic; Al Kooper; and Hendrix’s future Band of Gypsys bandmate Buddy Miles.

The volume of outtakes, Electric Ladyland: The Early Takes, contains audio pulled from reel-to-reel tapes Hendrix recorded himself on his personal Teac machine in March 1968 while staying at Manhattan’s Drake Hotel. These include early versions of “Voodoo Chile” and “Gypsy Eyes” as well as two songs that didn’t make the Ladyland finaltrack list – “Angel” and “My Friend”– and an early version of “… And the Gods Made Love” titled “At Lastthe Beginning.”  “He did these incredibly quietly,” Kramer says with a laugh. “You can hear the atmosphere of the hotel room. He’s almost whispering. Why? He doesn’t want to wake up the neighbors. He’d go, ‘Here’s “Electric Ladyland”‘ and he’d whisper, ‘Have you ever been? … ‘ It’s so warm and so intimate, and all of a sudden you hear a phone ringing and that’s the front desk calling and you can just hear in his voice he’s getting really pissed off. It’s great.”

Previously unreleased versions of “Angel Caterina” and “Little Miss Strange” on The Early Takes also feature a guest appearance by Stephen Stills. Kramer’s new 5.1 surround-sound remix showcases uncompressed 24 bit/96 kz high resolution audio, a first for a Hendrix studio album.

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The Jimi Hendrix Experience Live In This RARE Close Up Full Concert Filmed In Sweden 1969. Featuring all the songs we All know and love! One of Jimi’s Best Full Concerts Before His Tragic Death. This Hard To Find Live Performance of One of the true still Guitar Heroes Of our time.

“We’re gonna play nothing but oldies-but-baddies tonight, we haven’t played together in about six weeks, so we’re going to jam tonight and see what happens. Hope you don’t mind.”.. and as he steps away from the microphone we can vaguely hear him mumbling something like:  “You wouldn’t know the difference, anyway.”
Jimi Hendrix (intro to the concert)

On the whole, I can’t understand how anyone who saw us on this tour could have liked us. There was a lot of filming for Swedish TV and compared to similar films in 1967, we were a different group. Jimi was sullen and removed and actually slagged off the audience during the first set. He rarely bothered to sing. I paced grimly in my corner and turned my back on him. The sparkle was gone, very gone, replaced by exhaustion and boredom which showed in the sloppy repeats of the hits as we stared at the crowd with dead eyes. We hated playing Sweden. Always the same problem–no drugs. We were forced to drink the killer Schnapps, and it brought on Jimi’s mood for the first set.

Noel Redding (Are You Experienced?: The Inside Story Of The Jimi Hendrix Experience)

Jimi Hendrix – Guitar Noel Redding – Bass Mitch Mitchell – Drums

Setlist: 01 Killing Floor 02 Spanish Castle Magic 03 Fire 04 Hey Joe 05 Voodoo Child (Slight Return) 06 Red House 07 Sunshine Of Your Love

Live At The Konserthuset, Stockholm, Sweden, January 9th, 1969

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Consistently named the greatest guitar player of all time by pretty much every publication that has ever compiled such a list, Jimi Hendrix combined untouchable virtuosity, an improvisational spirit and poignant soul every time he picked up the instrument. But Hendrix was more than just a guitar slinger. He combined undeniable songwriting talent, a great ear for melody and a love of music rooted in tradition but with a definite slant towards experimentation and desire to break new ground in the studio.
On the surface, it’s very easy to look at Jimi Hendrix’s recorded output, After all, he only had a four-year recording career, with as many albums. With the Jimi Hendrix Experience, he recorded Are You Experienced (1967), Axis: Bold As Love (1967), Electric Ladyland (1968) and then the self-titled Band Of Gypsys, with the Band Of Gypsys in 1970. Each album is a killer in its own way but things start to get tricky when you delve into the myriad of releases that have appeared since the guitarist’s untimely death.

Cry Of Love  ( 1971 )

 ‘The Cry of Love’ is a posthumous fourth studio album by Hendrix. Originally part of an ambitious double album project ‘The Cry Of Love’ is a 10 track album compiled and mixed by Eddie Kramer and drummer Mitch Mitchell at Electric Lady Studios.

Inspired by the movie Easy Rider, this tune initially appeared on Cry of Love – the first posthumous release of Hendrix studio recordings and a collection of basically what was intended to be his next album. It seems to point in the direction that Jimi’s music was headed at the time: less sprawling and trippy, more straightforward and funky. It appeared on two more attempts to complete Hendrix’s fourth studio album: 1995’s Voodoo Soup and 1997’s First Rays of the New Rising Sun.

Blues ( 1994 )

Blues was among the early posthumous release that collected 13 tracks of you guessed it – blues-styled numbers, although for the most part they’re studio outtakes that probably were never intended for release. That said, “Hear My Train a Comin'” is featured twice, the closing number being a recording of an electric version he frequently played live. On the opening number, the keeper, Hendrix lets loose on the 12-string acoustic, showing off his skill as an unplugged player with a song that sounds very much like a timeless blues standard but is in fact an Hendrix original.

First Rays of the New Sun (1997)

When he died, Hendrix was working on a followup to Electric Ladyland that promised to be even more ambitious than that 1968 classic. First Rays of the New Sun is the best attempt to reconstruct the record that most likely would have been Hendrix’s fourth studio album. Most of the 17 songs here had shown up on other posthumous records (many of them are now out of print), but they make much more sense within this context. Other songs from the sessions appeared on South Saturn Delta . Highlights: “Freedom,” “Angel,” “Ezy Rider,” “My Friend” and “Stepping Stone.”
Finally, after years of finagling, this set was released with the blessing of the Jimi Hendrix estate. If anything, this is an approximation of what would have been the next Jimi Hendrix album, a sequel of sorts to Electric Ladyland. Where this album succeeds, when many posthumous (and unofficial) releases had failed, was that the Hendrix Estate involved Eddie KramerHendrix’s longtime recording engineer to assist in its assembly. While we’ll never know what Hendrix’s next album would have sounded like, this is as close as we’ll ever get ‘Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)’, the stunning ballad ‘Angel’, the dreamy ‘Drifting’ with its deft guitar work, ‘EZY Rider’ – featuring a guest appearance from Traffic’s Stevie Winwood – and the blistering funk rock of ‘Room Full Of Mirrors’, they all feature here and continue to indicate Hendrix’s brilliance as player, songwriter and singer. This is an album worthy of the Hendrix name, and worthy of your cash.
“If you give deeper thoughts in your music, then the masses will buy them,” Hendrix said, and if he’d finished this double LP his dreams might have come true. But as reimagined by longtime engineer-collaborator Eddie Kramer, it’s less startling musically than Electric Ladyland and not too profound lyrically. It’s also a powerful collection by a genius whose songwriting kept growing and whose solos rarely disappoint.
Alternative: Polydor Russia’s The Cry of Love/War Heroes combines two early-’70s posthumous releases.

South Saturn Delta (1997)

This 1997 album gathers a bunch of leftovers that had shown up on other posthumous albums over the years, like the out-of-print Rainbow Bridge and War Heroes. It’s mostly a collection of demos, alternate takes and sketches of songs recorded between 1967 and the time of Hendrix’s death, but it’s an essential piece for collectors.
The unreleased “Here He Comes (Lover Man)” and the 1967 B-side “The Stars That Play With Laughing Sam’s Dice.” Released the same year as First Rays Of The Rising Sun, South Saturn Delta is a hotchpotch of demo takes, alternative and unfinished versions. Now, that usually spells disaster, but in this case the Hendrix Estate came up with another winning release. The alternate version of ‘All Along The Watchtower’, his take on ‘Drifter’s Escape’ – another Bob Dylan song – and the beautiful instrumental ‘Pali Gap’ (originally featured on the Rainbow Bridge LP) are worth the price of admission alone. The completely new ‘Look Over Yonder’ is an interesting (and particularly strong) addition and it makes you wonder why Hendrix omitted to include it on any of his records released in his lifetime, while this is one of the few places you’ll find a genuinely acoustic Hendrix track  ‘Midnight Lightning’ may only be a demo take, but Jimi’s swampy delta blues-style song is a definite winner. Notably, the title track is probably the most unusual and unlikely Hendrix song – it’s almost jazz rock in nature and unlike anything you ordinarily associate with him – there’s even a horn section. It makes you wonder just what direction Jimi would have pursued if he was still alive.

‘BBC Sessions’ (1998)

Everybody who is anybody in British music has performed for the BBC — the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and the Who, among countless others, have recorded live sessions for British radio. In 1967 and 1969, Hendrix and the Experience laid down more than three dozen tracks. This two-disc set gathers almost all of them. There’s plenty of familiar Hendrix songs here (“Fire,” “Hey Joe,” etc.), but the great covers — including Bob Dylan’s “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?” and the Beatles’ “Day Tripper” — make it one of the Top 10 Posthumous Jimi Hendrix Albums.
Given that the Jimi Hendrix Experience were a primarily British band, it’s hardly surprising that they managed to rack up several performances for the BBC. Packaged together here as the BBC Sessions, we’re treated to everything they ever recorded for the Beeb, whether for TV or radio, including the candidly aborted ‘Hey Joe’ morphing into ‘Sunshine Of Your Love’ from the Lulu show the day after Cream split up.
It’s the cover songs that really hold the most interest – Jimi takes on The Beatles’ ‘Day Tripper’, Willie Dixon’s ‘Hoochie Coochie Man’ (featuring Alexis Korner on slide guitar), Leiber & Stoller’s ‘Hound Dog’ and somewhat bizarrely Stevie Wonder’s ‘I Was Made To Love Her’ with none other than the song’s composer on drums.
Of the 32 tracks on this record, we’re given no less than three versions of both ‘Foxy Lady’ and ‘Hey Joe’ but it matters little since Jimi opted to extend and jam every time he played them, so on each recording you’re treated to something a little different. Another bonus point for this collection is the simple fact that the quality is astounding. It isn’t a half-arsed bootleg, these are studio masters lovingly taken care of by Eddie Kramer before release
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The Jimi Hendrix Experience’ (2000)

This four-disc box set includes some previously released material — mostly the songs you’d expect on an anthology like this. But it’s also stuffed with lots of alternate versions, live cuts and other rare tracks making their first appearances. This is one of the best primers for fans who want to dive a little deeper into Hendrix’s surprisingly vast catalog.

Valleys of Neptune (2010)

Remarkably, the dozen studio tracks on this 2010 album had never been released before. Mostly recorded with the original Experience after the release of Electric Ladyland in 1968, Valleys of Neptune includes reworked versions of Jimi Hendrix classics like “Stone Free” and “Fire” as well as instrumental cover of Cream’s “Sunshine of Your Love” and a few bluesy originals. Highlights: the title tune and a cover of Elmore James’ “Bleeding Heart.”

West Coast Seattle Boy: The Jimi Hendrix Anthology (2010)

Like The Jimi Hendrix Experience box the four-disc West Coast Seattle Boy tells Hendrix’s story through his music. But this terrific set plays out like a biography, starting with his session work for R&B stars like the Isley Brothers and Little Richard, and ending with some of the final recordings he made just months before his death. In between are tons of previously unreleased studio jams, concert performances and cover songs (like an acoustic cover of Dylan and the Band’s “Tears of Rage”) that confirm Hendrix’s legacy as one of the all-time greats.

People Hell And Angels

People, Hell & Angels is an album of twelve previously unreleased Jimi Hendrix studio recordings. The album showcases the legendary guitarist working outside of the original Jimi Hendrix Experience trio. Beginning in 1968, Jimi Hendrix grew restless, eager to develop new material with old friends and new ensembles.

Outside the view of a massive audience that had established the Experience as rock’s largest grossing concert act and simultaneously placed two of his albums together in the US Top 10 sales chart, Jimi was busy working behind the scenes to craft his next musical statement.

Both Sides Of The Sky (2017 )

Legacy Recordings present this dynamic new album of 13 previously unreleased studio recordings, made between January 1968 and February 1970. Notable collaborators include Stephen Stills. This is the third and final volume in a trilogy of previously unreleased material

The previously unissued version of “Lover Man,” which UNCUT deemed “a weaponised piece of funk, with Buddy Miles in particularly thunderous form,” was recorded at the Record Plant in New York on December 15th, 1969 by Hendrix’s then recently assembled new band: Billy Cox on bass, Buddy Miles on drums and, of course, Hendrix on guitar and vocals. The session took place two weeks before the trio introduced itself to the world via four triumphant New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day concerts at the Fillmore East, which would ultimately yield the live album Band of Gypsys (1970) as well as its, critically acclaimed follow up, 2016’s Machine Gun.

Heralded by Relix as “both a historically valuable document . . . and a treat musically,” Both Sides of the Sky, the album home of “Lover Man,” is the third volume in a trilogy of albums intended to present the best and most significant unissued studio recordings remaining in Jimi Hendrix’s archive. It follows Valleys of Neptune (2010) and People, Hell and Angels (2013), which both achieved top 5 chart ranking on Billboard’s Top 100 album chart. Recorded between January 1968 and February 1970, and featuring guest appearances by Stephen Stills, Johnny Winter and Lonnie Youngblood, Both Sides of the Sky contains 10 unreleased tracks. The project was co-produced by Eddie Kramer, Jimi Hendrix’s recording engineer on all of his albums made during his life,

Muddy Waters’ “Mannish Boy” was reworked by the trio that would come to be known as Band of Gypsys (Jimi Hendrix, bassist Billy Cox, drummer Buddy Miles) during their first ever recording session on April 22nd, 1969 at the Record Plant in New York.

At this point, some 47 years after Jimi Hendrix’s death, it’s probably unrealistic to expect that a set of deep-vault studio tracks can expand the guitarist’s legacy in any meaningful way. This no doubt dismays the Hendrix obsessives, who pine for the long-whispered-about radical experiments they believe Hendrix squirreled away in some Electric Ladyland broom closet. Both Sides of the Sky is the third and purportedly final instalment in a trilogy of albums (starting with 2010’s Valleys of Neptune and 2013’s People, Hell & Angels dedicated to highlighting Jimi’s creative development throughout the last two years of what was an incredibly short albeit spectacular career.

For the rest of us, the arrival of any sort of Hendrix material, especially if it’s captured in the studio, is a chance to be awed, all over again and in surprising ways, by this human’s freakish powers of musical persuasion. No rock figure before or since could breathe fire like Hendrix does, on his beloved well-known albums and on the assortment that is Both Sides Of The Sky. Even when he’s playing the well-worn heard-it-a-zillion-times blues like the opening track “Mannish Boy.” Even when he’s dropping an over-the-top theatrical solo on his original “Hear My Train A-Comin'” that alternately celebrates and shatters blues tropes.

Jimi Hendrix, Both Sides of the Sky
Both Sides of the Sky comes out March 9th via Experience Hendrix LLC.

Both Sides Of The Sky culls music from sessions Hendrix began in 1968 as the follow-up to Electric Ladyland – but never completed as a cogent single album. Though its track list includes a tune with original Jimi Hendrix Experience members Mitch Mitchell and Noel Redding, the bulk of the set features the lineup that became Band of Gypsies – bassist Billy Cox and drummer Buddy Miles. Given the high-elevation stratospheres the second great Hendrix trio visited later on, it’s interesting to hear the group attend to rhythm in more foundational ways – check out the way they lock into and maintain the blazing breakneck pace of “Stepping Stone.” The steady backing allows Hendrix to tear into the massive contorted fistfuls of notes that define his solo.

Starting with “Mannish Boy,” a bluesy funky rocker that finds Hendrix exploring his inner Muddy Waters, the cut is also the first known recording he made with Buddy Miles (drums) and Billy Cox (Bass) in April 1969, several months before the trio officially named themselves the Band of Gypsys. “Lover Man,” also recorded with Cox and Miles in December 1969, is another up-tempo tune Jimi had been tinkering with since 1967’s Are You Experienced but never quite managed to perfect to his satisfaction.

Hendrix was open to all kinds of ideas during this period, and some of the most interesting moments involve studio visitors. Stephen Stills sings and plays on two tracks (his original “$20 Fine” and a new Joni Mitchell tune called “Woodstock,” which features Hendrix on bass). Johnny Winter appears as a Hendrix jousting partner on “Things I Used To Do,” and a figure from Hendrix‘ pre-stardom days, the singer and saxophonist Lonnie Youngblood, steps in for “Georgia Blues.”

He lets rip on a scorching “Hear My Train A Comin’,” backed by Mitch Mitchell (drums) and Noel Redding (bass), followed by a country-tinged rendition of “Stepping Stone,” the last single released during his lifetime.

On other tracks Jimi burns the midnight amp via “Jungle,” a previously unreleased instrumental, along with an embryonic take of “Sweet Angel” (recorded in January 1968), a song inspired by a dream Jimi had of his late mother, and continued to work on until his death.

Fans of Crosby, Stills & Nash may be fascinated to hear a nascent reading of Joni Mitchell’s “Woodstock,” with Stephen Stills singing and Hendrix filling in the role on bass. On other tracks Jimi branches out, exploring new musical territory on the medium-tempo ballad “Send My Love To Linda,” 

All these performances – along with the searching guitar/sitar/drums instrumental “Cherokee Mist” that closes the album – overflow with the single salient trait that made Hendrix unstoppable: his spirit. No matter what he’s playing, whether it’s a workman’s blues or some high-concept improvisation, he conveys, just through the way he sings and the way he shapes the notes, that what he’s doing matters. And will not be stopped. There’s always something deep and existential on the line, and it is that emotional intensity – not the songs, not the flashy solo playing – that defines every Hendrix encounter. This one just doesn’t disappoint.

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John Peel’s legendary status is defined by the vast amount of bands and artists he championed. His urge to “hear something he hadn’t heard before” led to a relentless search through demo tapes sent in to his radio show from songwriters and musicians looking for a break. His conviction in not following conventional programming formats, and offering his listeners an alternative to daytime pop pap would ensure that his relevance to broadcasting would remain vital right up to his untimely death in 2004.

His sessions would become an important outlet for new listeners to sample live selections from fledgling and established artists. Many of these recordings have been released to the public, some remain in the vaults. Here is a continuing history of all the sessions, starting in 1967 for his “Top Gear” show right up to the final recording in October 2004.

recorded 15th December 1967: Jimi Hendrix Session

Tracklist

Day Tripper
Spanish Castle Magic
Radio One Jingle
Wait Until Tomorrow

The Band

Jimi Hendrix (Guitar, Vocals)
Mitch Mitchell (Drums)
Noel Redding (Bass, Vocals)

Jimi Hendrix Experience Poster

Jimi Hendrix and the Flying Eyeball are images indelibly linked in the psychedelic poster art of the late Rick Griffin. Griffin discovered The Eyeball, in a much more benign form, in the 1950s auto detailing art of California pinstriper Von Dutch and reworked it over time to become the winged, bloodshot figure parting a ring of fire with serpent-like tentacles. The highlighted lettering, vivid color, and complicated imagery reflect Griffin’s attention to precise details and the influence of Indian lore on his work.

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The four shows that the Band Of Gypsys played at Fillmore East to bring in the New Year have rightly gone down as some of the best shows of all time, especially those on New Year’s Day itself. There were moments on New Year’s Eve where the band seemed to be lacking energy for whatever reason but on the whole every show was fantastic, as stated by the lucky devils I interviewed who were there to witness the shows for themselves. The music was funkier than that of the Hendrix Experience and while the drums may seem simple at times especially compared to Mitch Mitchell, the drums are a pivotal piece to the music that Hendrix was playing at this particular time. The Band Of Gypsys wouldn’t last for much longer with their final show coming less then a month later at Madison Square Garden in New York (Hendrix would leave the stage after just two songs and Miles would be fired backstage) but the music the band played at these four shows was and continues to be nothing short of exceptional.

There are certain artists who played certain shows with certain performances that will always be remembered, and that is certainly the case with the Band Of Gypsys at Fillmore East.

 Second Show setlist:

  1. Stone Free
  2. Them Changes
  3. Power Of Soul
  4. Message To Love
  5. Earth Blues
  6. Machine Gun
  7. Voodoo Child (Slight Return)
  8. We Gotta Live Together
  9. Wild Thing
  10. Hey Joe
  11. Purple Haze

Bill Graham himself has been quoted as saying the fourth and final show the Band Of Gyspys played at Fillmore East was something else entirely:

Bill Graham

“I will never again see a performance by a guitarist-vocalist with that intensity, with that total emotional impact. It was like an adagio dance. The guitar was the snake, and he was the snake charmer.”

Graham introduced the Gyspys himself with the band beginning to ramp things up as he brings the short but effective introduction to a close. Stone Free is the opening number and if you thought the band couldn’t be any tighter after an exciting early show, you couldn’t be more wrong. The band sounded powerful before but during this performance there are moments of delicacy and calmness that when paired with the overall power of the three members playing together, produces music on a magical scale. Them Changes and Power Of Soul follow suit in the exact same order that worked so well during the early show. Two funky numbers this good back to back will guarantee a happy audience and that was certainly the case at this show. Miles then introduces the next song, “Jimi’s going to do a thing he wrote called Message To Love” before the band build up to the main riff. It’s a fine moment from this late show with Miles supplying backing vocals behind Hendrix on lead. This rendition is a full two minutes longer than the version that was played the previous night which really highlights the difference in focus from Hendrix during this final show at Fillmore East, and the same can be said for Earth Blues which follows.

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The next song is Machine Gun which clocks in at twenty minutes and packs the same kind of wallop as the performance at the early show, although the tempo is a little slower. Hendrix takes off yet again on this track before the band turn to Voodoo Chile (Slight Return), with Hendrix saying “we’re trying to figure out something to play but we only know about six songs now,” which is no doubt referencing the lack of original material the Band Of Gypsys had at the time. But that’s ok because four of the final five songs the band played at this show were Hendrix Experience songs starting with Voodoo Chile (Slight Return), resulting in the energy level inside Fillmore East to rise above the high level it was already at. The Gypsys then go straight into We Gotta Live Together, a song penned by Buddy Miles and the only time this song was played during the Fillmore East run. The song appears to be more about getting the audience involved with Miles asking them to clap along to the track. It’s a fun, uncomplicated song designed for one thing and one thing only, to get the audience moving. And it worked! The Gypsys then turn to something more recognisable in Wild Thing with Hendrix’s fuzz ringing through the air. The power of the fuzz alone when the song begins is outstanding. Hey Joe and Purple Haze are the final two songs which is fitting considering they were the first two singles that Hendrix released with the Experience and remain to this day as two of the most recognisable Jimi Hendrix songs. Hey Joe does lose a bit of excitement in the drum department due to the lack of Mitch Mitchell behind the kit but Miles does his own thing and stamps his own feel on to the track. Purple Haze is the perfect show closer with the fuzz all the way up once more, that thick tone probing ever corner of the venue with the crowd then going wild when Hendrix and the Gypsys walk off the stage after finishing.

But even at the Fillmore East with the Band of Gypsys he sometimes found old habits hard to break. Graham says that Hendrix’s first set on the second night was in fact a disappointing reversion to his showbiz stunts. When Hendrix asked him during intermission what he thought of the set, Graham was brutally frank.

“I said, ‘You’re Jimi Hendrix, and anything you do is taken as gospel because of who you are,'” says Graham. “‘In the first show, you humped the guitar, you played it with your teeth, you stuck it behind your back. You just forgot to play.'” Stunned, Hendrix went back out onstage for the second show and played. The incandescent version of “Machine Gun” on the 1970 live LP Band of Gypsys was recorded during that show.

“The solo on ‘Machine Gun’ was absolutely astonishing,” declares Alan Douglas, who saw both sets. “In the first show, he was playing to the audience, having a good time, jumping around. In the second show, he dug right into the music.”

After the second show, Graham raced backstage to congratulate Hendrix. “He came over, totally drained, full of sweat from top to bottom, right up to my face, and said, ‘All right, motherfucker? That good enough for you? You gonna let me go now?'” Hendrix then wheeled around back on to the stage for his encore and did, in Graham’s words, “fifteen minutes of the greatest shtick you’d ever want to see” – grinding up against his Strat, picking it with his teeth, the works. Having proved to Graham and the Fillmore crowd the true depth of his musical gift, Hendrix returned to the stage to show ’em all, one more time, that he was still one of rock’s greatest showmen.

“At one point, he looked to the side of the stage and stuck his tongue out at me,” Graham laughs. “It was very, very funny.”

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/concerts-that-changed-rock-jimi-hendrix-and-the-band-of-gypsies-at-the-fillmore-east-new-york-19870604#ixzz3ynrz7Nd6
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The following is one of the finest recollections of the final show the Band Of Gypsys played at Fillmore East:

Ian Lowell (Audience Member)

“On January 1st, 1970, Jeff Mayer and I celebrated the New Year with a major bang. We bought two first-rate tickets in the orchestra for a late show at the Fillmore East to see Jimi Hendrix and the Band of Gypsys. The group was introduced as they hit the stage at about 1:45 am by none other than Bill Graham. Hendrix was no longer performing with the Experience, who had now been replaced by drummer Buddy Miles and bass player Billy Cox. We did not know quite what to expect in the way of a set list or the manner in which the songs would be performed. Although I asked a number of other friends to go with us, there was a decided lack of interest. This apathy had inexplicably carried over to the general public as the show was nowhere near a sellout; about 25% of the tickets remained unsold. On a given night in New York City, in a city of eight million people, only about 2,000 people actually saw fit to pay $5 to $7 to see the greatest guitar player who ever lived in an intimate setting. To the best of my knowledge, this was the only time Graham had raised the ticket prices for a specific show. It was clearly their loss and not ours.

The show began with Jimi’s own “Stone Free” which was played at an uncharacteristically frantic pace. Precisely two minutes into the number, as the collective jaws of the audience began to drop, seemingly in unison, Jimi began a solo that lasted nearly eight minutes, during which he managed to coax sounds out of his instrument at various times with a wha-wha and feedback from outer space and at other times with no aid whatsoever. The solo was so astounding it took on a life of its own as it went off in countless directions. During the solo, Buddy Miles went into a sort of scat singing that added to the unique nature of what we were witnessing. Even by the standards set forth by Jimi Hendrix, the solo was something totally unmatched. The song had been reworked so radically that it was a totally different number greatly enhanced by the funky, soulful and skillful playing of Buddy Miles and Billy Cox. Band of Gypsys brought us funk, rock, soul and blues from a place somewhere between the planets Neptune and Saturn. Unlike his shows with the Experience, Jimi shared the spotlight and did so on the following number, one that Miles was best known for; “Them Changes.” This version was above reproach with Hendrix and the hard-edged funk of Cox’s simple but powerful bass playing adding a new dimension to an already great song.

“Power of Soul” was a song that best typified the new sound of Band of Gypsys and presented a powerfully compelling “funkified” groove. It was too infectious to resist. The refrain told us in deceptively simple but irresistible fashion that, with the “power of soul,” all things were possible and so it was with Jimi’s music. Jimi and Buddy led us into an eerie, faraway place with their harmonies. Even for Hendrix, the music ventured deep into unknown territory and it was tremendously unique and creative. “Message to Love,” the next number, broke new ground and also managed to find another irresistible groove. A few songs later, Hendrix played the relentlessly intense and affecting “Machine Gun,” Jimi’s tribute to our men who continued to risk paying the ultimate sacrifice in Vietnam. In terrifyingly realistic fashion, the song somehow managed the impossible, recreating the sounds of the horrors of war with a guitar. It was one of those accomplishments from Hendrix that could not possibly have been done by anyone else. Several songs later, Hendrix performed a positively scathing version of one of his better known songs “Voodoo Child” followed by a loose, ragged and fun version of Miles’ “We Gotta Live Together.” The show concluded with powerful versions of “Wild Thing,” “Hey Joe” and “Purple Haze.” Band of Gypsys concluded a brilliantly conceived and performed show just shy of two hours long.”

Bobby London (Audience Member)

“The music was great but his physical presence was restrained. Much later I read that Bill Graham was taunting him just before he went on and I sort of figured it out. He seemed very withdrawn. I went to the show alone, I think, I felt kind of bad for him but I was grateful to be a kid in his presence. I don’t mean to infer he was out of it. His playing was masterful, he was in control, he was just holding back. It was kind of insane. I loved him and was happy to finally see him but it was a sad and perplexing evening. It was the 60’s, man! All I remember was being transfixed. It was Hendrix!”

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thanks to Tom Caswell for this article

Evening Standard, Hulton Archive,Getty Images

Hendrix wasn’t one to play by the rules, and on Jan. 4, 1969, during a guest appearance on the Lulu television show, the guitar legend was up to the task. While Lulu was a great pop singer, she and Hendrix were pretty much worlds apart in the public eye,. Still, the producers of her BBC TV show booked the Jimi Hendrix Experience and approached Hendrix about singing a duet with Lulu on her big hit, “To Sir With Love,” which was not first and foremost on Jimi Hendrix’s mind, to say the least.
The band were scheduled to perform two songs, one from their latest LP, Electric Ladyland, and later in the show, they were to do their first U.K. hit, “Hey Joe.” According to Noel Redding in his autobiography, Are You Experienced?, Lulu would join the band to finish up “Hey Joe” before a segue into her signature song. To deal with the stress of the situation, Redding said the band were “so straight it was only natural that we would try to combat that atmosphere by having a smoke in our dressing room. In our haste, the lump of hash got away and slipped down the sink drainpipe,” he continued. “I found a maintenance man and begged tools from him with the story of a lost ring. He was too helpful, offering to dismantle the drain for us. It took ages to dissuade him, but we succeeded in our task and had a great smoke.”
The band went on and performed “Voodoo Child” as scheduled, but once Lulu introduced the band for their classic take on “Hey Joe,” the Experience veered loudly off script. A raucous free-form, feedback-drenched jam eventually gave way to “Hey Joe,” but midway through, Hendrix stopped and announced “We’d like to stop playing this rubbish and dedicate a song to the Cream, regardless of what kind of group they may be in. We dedicate this to Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce.”


At that moment, the band plowed through an instrumental version of the Cream classic “Sunshine of Your Love.” Cream had just announced their breakup, hence the tribute. “We played past the point where Lulu might have joined us,” said Redding. “Played through the time for talking at the end, played through [producer] Stanley [Dorfman] tearing his hair, pointing to his watch and silently screaming at us.”
This stunt, which led to a ban on Hendrix and friends by the BBC, would be imitated eight years later by Elvis Costello during an appearance on Saturday Night Live. Costello and the Attractions started off playing “Less Than Zero,” before he stopped the song and the band kicked into “Radio Radio.” NBC banned Costello for 12 years. He later admitted that it was indeed an homage to Hendrix on the Lulu show.

 

Jimi Hendrix’s death announcement, September 18th, 1970 on ABC News.
Some inaccuracies of the clip.. Its an incredible clip – from WABC-TV Channel 7 Eyewitness News, in New York City — announcing Jimi’s death in September of 1970. While reported with some of the bewilderment and detachment you’d expect from the mainstream media of the era, when speaking of rock and roll and the youth culture in general, the report is surprisingly respectful; describing Jimi as an “astonishing” performer, and speaking highly of his talent.


“he didnt die of an overdose either…the official cause was “inhalation of vommit… he took 20 sleeping pills with wine, threw up in his sleep, inhaled it and died…and he was 27 not 28”

“You have to understand during that time there was a huge generation gap. The reporter’s attitude were normal at that time. Rock music was viewed in a non flattering way and associated with over extended drug use by society.

I particularly like that the reporter says “During his short career Hendrix Flailed his -clears throat to read his notes/written material?- Some of the most unusual sounds of an unusual music” to describe his music.

He Invented the Intense-Space-Exploring Guitar Solo. listen to Voodoo Child off of Electric Ladyland.  Listen to the Live recording of Stone free off of Live at the Fillmore East. Regarding getting the classic Hendrix tone for guitar players.
Firstly, many people disregard the fact that 50% of the fact he used Fender amps in the studio. Hey Joe was on a Fender Blackface Twin Reverb, Voodoo Chile/Voodoo Child (Slight Return) were on a Fender Tweed Bassman, The Wind Cries Mary was again on a Twin Reverb, etc. He even used Bassman stacks, or Dual Showman stacks for his a good part of his live performances.

Now, to the Wah pedal. Hendrix (to my ears) had 4 Wah pedals. Vox V848 Clyde Mccoy Script Wah (1967) – Burning of The Midnight Lamp, Voodoo Child (Slight Return). Vox V846 Wah (1968-1969) – Used in live performances.

Thomas Organ Jen Crybaby (1967) – Still Raining, Still Dreaming, Come on (Let The Good Times Roll). Roger Mayer Modded Vox V846 Wah (1967) – Up From The Skies.

Hendrix’s 2 Marshall stacks were both 1959 100 Watts Superleads.

Hendrix’s fuzzes were:Dallas Arbiter Germanium Red Fuzz Face (1966) – Are You Experienced – Electric Ladyland Dallas Arbiter Silicon Fuzz Face (1969) – Used on various live performances, and studio works.

Mystery Roger Mayer Modded Silicon Fuzz Face (1969?) – Rumoured to be the Octavia circuit without the octave up.
Used in Woodstock (1969), Band of Gypsies (1970), Live at Berkley (1970).