Posts Tagged ‘Margo Price’

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In 2012, country singer Margo Price wrote the soul-searching anthem “Hey Child” shortly after the death of her baby boy, Ezra. After being encouraged to re-record the song, The song touches on her past struggles with substance abuse and mental health when she was dealing with the loss of her son. Price shares that she and her husband, Jeremy Ivey, 42, delved into drinking and partying to cope with their loss. The country singer opens up about battling inner demons after the loss of her son. 

We had begun hanging with a rowdy group of degenerate musician friends and partying harder than The Rolling Stones,” says Price, 37,. “The song was about how many of our talented friends were drinking and partying their talents away, but after a few years had passed, we realized it was just as much about us as our friends.” Back in 2018,after an unfortunate night of drinking, she ended up in Davidson County jail for three days. “When you lose a child you cope differently,” she said, praising Ivey with providing stability during that difficult time. “I think it’s amazing that our marriage lasted after that because the statistics are not in our favour. But he’s been there right beside me.”

With this new music video, Price recounts this exact night. The visuals show a “gritty depiction” of her facing her inner demons, crashing her car, going to jail and then beating the darkness that she had found herself in. I know so many people who struggle with substance abuse,” says Price. “I just lost a family member to alcohol. My second cousin Tammy locked herself into a hotel room and drank herself to death two months ago. In another life, that could have been me.”

Price says that originally she did not want to revisit the song “Hey Child” after having written it all the way back in 2012, but the encouragement from the producer for her album “That’s How Rumors Get Started”, and her band, helped her to do it.

“Funny enough, I initially didn’t want to re-record ‘Hey Child,’ But Sturgill was producing the record and he convinced me to. When I brought it in to play for the band they were all blown away by the song — that made me fall back in love with it.” With bringing the song back to life today, Price finds a whole new meaning to it as she reveals that she recently decided to stop drinking. 

“I just found it’s not serving me in any way. At first, it was just going to be a break, like when folks do ‘dry January’ — I’ve done that so many times,” says Price. “But after reading Holly Whitaker’s book Quit Like a Woman I’m seeing alcohol in a completely different light and may never drink again. Maybe that’s why I feel connected to this song again and wanted to make a video, to paint a picture of where I’ve been in my past lives. Sometimes you have to accept and forgive yourself for the mistakes and the failures you’ve made in your life in order to shed the layers and move on. 

On this road of recovery, there is more to smile about as she and Ivey were blessed with a beautiful baby girl, Ramona Lynn, in 2019. She joined Ezra’s twin brother, Judah, now 10.

Kicking off with “Tomorrow People” reaching into the future, a future none of us want but seem to be moving towards, and asking how it’s going. The frustration many of us have felt with how the direction the world as a whole has been moving towards is felt in this song and is the mission statement of the record. Jeremy can write quite the sprawling tale as seen on “Paradise Alley” that’s so vivid you can picture it unfolding in front of you as you listen. There’s a Dylan, Petty, Young feel to the whole record with “Hands Down Your Pockets” feeling like an amalgam of all three. This is an angry record pointing directly at everything happening in the world. “White Shadow” is about the current Black Lives Matter movement and how white people’s time in power is over. “Things Could Get Much Worse” is pretty self-explanatory in the title, but it’s the wit of the lyrics that really sells it.

The most scathing take on society as it stands today is “Someone Else’s Problem” and it really nails how many people feel on a day to day basis. There is so much going and so many folks are angry at one another and looking to blame someone else, but in the end “they’re really no such thing as someone else’s problem”. “Loser Town” could have been written by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers at any time in his career and Ivey along with his band  The Extraterrestrials do their best impression of the band on the record and it feels like a love letter to Petty. There’s that guitar riff, everyday man quality, and current storytelling that feels like it could have been written about any era that is so Petty-esque. “How It Has To Be” closes the record out showing off all the tricks lyrically by Jeremy and musically by the band that they’ve displayed on the rest of the album. It’s such a beautiful last track. This is such a great record and deserved far more spins than it got.

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I can’t say enough great things about this album and this man. These songs are a very realistic view of our world. The pictures Jeremy paints are both sad and hopeful. He truly is a word smith for our times… I can’t wait for all the great things yet to come his way. 

Jeremy Ivey – guitar, vocals, harmonica, piano, synth, The Extraterrestrials are:
Evan Donohue – guitar, vocals
Coley Hinson – bass, vocals
Alex Munoz – guitar, lap steel
Josh Minyard – drums, percussion

Special guests: Margo Price – vocals, percussion

Dillion Napier – drums, percussion
Micah Hulscher – organ, piano, synth, electric piano
Dexter Green – vocals and additional arrangement on Movies

Released October 16th, 2020

Production – Margo Price
Co-production – Jeremy Ivey and The Extraterrestrials
Arrangements – Margo Price, Jeremy Ivey and The Extraterrestrials

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Margo Price’s album is the work of a singer ready to shake up preconceived notions. The Nashville musician has been doing that all along to a degree, but That’s How Rumors Get Started is a conscious—and sometimes self-conscious step out from under the shadow of all the “bright future of country music” buzz that surrounded her previous solo work. That’s How Rumors Get Started is Price’s third LP as a solo artist, after three previous albums fronting the Nashville band Buffalo Clover. If that group had a shaggy late-’60s blues-rock bent à la Big Brother and the Holding Company, Price certainly leaned more toward the sound of fiddles and pedal steel guitar on Midwest Farmer’s Daughter in 2016 and All American Made in 2017. The latter even featured a duet with Willie Nelson. This time around, there’s as much blustery rock and hard-edged soul as there is country twang. Margo Price has paid her dues, both professionally and personally. Whereas she honours those challenges, she rejects singularity as the underlying factor in defining her music and identity. In That’s How Rumors Get Started, Price reimagines Americana’s sound as well as her position within the genre.

Some of that change is probably due to Price’s old pal Sturgill Simpson, who produced the album and assembled a band to play on it, in place of Price’s usual road band. On the other hand, the mix of sounds is more in line with what Price presents onstage in concert. When it works here, she demonstrates a certain amount of breadth as a performer. Yet it doesn’t always work. There’s a difference between upending expectations and contrarian posturing, and the song writing on That’s How Rumors Get Started isn’t consistently sharp enough to strike the right balance. Price goes for broad strokes on these 10 songs, musically and lyrically.

“That’s How Rumors Get Started”, an album of ten new, original songs that commit her sky-high and scorching rock-and-roll show to record for the very first time. Produced by long time friend Sturgill Simpson (co-produced by Margo and David Ferguson), the LP marks Price’s debut for Loma Vista Recordings, and whether she’s singing of motherhood or the mythologies of stardom, Nashville gentrification or the national healthcare crisis, relationships or growing pains, she’s crafted a collection of music that invites people to listen closer than ever before.

Margo primarily cut That’s How Rumors Get Started at Los Angeles’ EastWest Studios (Pet Sounds, “9 to 5”). Tracking occurred over several days while she was pregnant with daughter Ramona. “They’re both a creation process,” she says. “And I was being really good to my body and my mind during that time. I had a lot of clarity from sobriety.”

While Margo Price continued to collaborate on most of the song writing with her husband Jeremy Ivey, she recorded with an historic band assembled by Sturgill, and including guitarist Matt Sweeney (Adele, Iggy Pop), bassist Pino Palladino (D’Angelo, John Mayer), drummer James Gadson (Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye), and keyboardist Benmont Tench (Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers). Background vocals were added by Simpson on “Letting Me Down,” and the Nashville Friends Gospel Choir, who raise the arrangements of “Hey Child” and “What Happened To Our Love?” to some of the album’s most soaring heights.

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Margo Price and her steady touring band – Kevin Black (bass), Jamie Davis (guitar), Micah Hulsher (keys), and Dillon Napier (drums) – will perform songs from That’s How Rumors Get Started at dozens of shows with Chris Stapleton and The Head & The Heart this spring and summer, in addition to festival appearances and more to be announced soon.

“That’s How Rumors Get Started” follows Margo’s 2017 album All American Made, which was named the #1 Country/Americana album of the year by Rolling Stone, and one of the top albums of the decade by Esquire, Pitchfork and Billboard, among others. In its wake, Margo sold out three nights at The Ryman Auditorium, earned her first Grammy nomination for Best New Artist, and much more.
Released July 10th, 2020

New album, “That’s How Rumors Get Started” out now

Margo Price’s take on classic sounds is at once familiar and daring, an infectious blend of Nashville country, Memphis soul, and Texas twang. The release is a beautiful summary of Margo’s triumphant three-night run at The Ryman Auditorium in May 2018, and features guest appearances from Emmylou Harris, Jack White, and Sturgill Simpson.

A note from Margo: “Two years ago today I headlined the Ryman and it was something I had dreamed of since I was a little girl. We did three nights in a row and recorded all of them. I am so excited that we are releasing it – the recordings are rough and the performances are raw, but there was a magic there and the band was on fire. We played unreleased songs, alternative album versions and lots of special guests. I hope it moves you.”

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A great country voice, great songs, great guests. It makes me whish I could have been at the Ryman on that night.

As the follow up to Jeremy Ivey’s 2019’s debut, the much acclaimed “The Dream and the Dreamer”, his new album Waiting Out the Storm takes a topical turn with songs that allude to the malaise that’s seeping the nation in the wake of our current political maelstrom, a concurrence of natural disasters, the Covid pandemic, and the growing resolve of the Black Lives Matter movement and the racism found in its stead.

It’s not a preachy record by any means, but it does stir some sentiments and speak to those issues and concerns that have forced Americans to wake up and take notice, no matter which side of the divide they happen to be on. “Yeah, it was actually written before my first album was released, but these kind of things have been making headlines for a while,” Ivey suggests when asked about the origins of his stirring new songs. “Racism, violence and greed have been the backbone of civilization for some time.” Ivey adds that he’s injected his own insights into this material, suggesting that he’s been more than a mere outside observer. “Yes, I’ve lived inside each one of these stories,” he affirms somewhat obliquely. “I’ve seen Walt Disney, Al Capone and Oprah hanging out with Warhol.

I’ve seen the queen of doom wringing her hands and holy meat walking down the street. I’ve seen the shattered windows of clinics and prostitutes in steel-toed boots too. It’s all truth.” Given that Ivey seems resigned to a more pessimistic perspective, suffice it to say he views things from a decidedly bleak point of view. “Our country has lost every bit of morals and dignity, but maybe our country never had that in the first place,” he insists. “We need to wake up and start treating each other the way that we want to be treated, because if that doesn’t happen, you think this pandemic is bad? There will be a great judgment on this world and everyone in it if we don’t take this kind of thing seriously. When one person kills another person, and it’s known publicly, and no one is tried or punished for it, the end is near. Things could get much worse.”

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I can’t say enough great things about this album and this man. These songs are a very realistic view of our world. The pictures Jeremy paints are both sad and hopeful. He truly is a word smith for our times… I can’t wait for all the great things yet to come his way. Recorded with his group The Extraterrestrials, and produced by his wife Margo Price and with  contributions from members of her backing band, the album is, he says, was the result of the pair’s ability to work well together and remain, as he describes it, “relaxed and focused.

The Band: Jeremy Ivey – guitar, vocals, harmonica, piano, synth The Extraterrestrials are: Evan Donohue – guitar, vocals Coley Hinson – bass, vocals Alex Munoz – guitar, lap steel Josh Minyard – drums, percussion Special guests: Margo Price – vocals, percussion Dillion Napier – drums, percussion Micah Hulscher – organ, piano, synth, electric piano Dexter Green – vocals and additional arrangement on Movies.

Released October 16th Production – Margo Price Co-production – Jeremy Ivey and The Extraterrestrials

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The new album, produced by Sturgill Simpson, commits her sky-high and scorching rock-and-roll show to record for the very first time. Whether she’s singing of motherhood or the mythologies of stardom, Nashville gentrification or the national healthcare crisis, relationships or growing pains, she’s crafted a collection of music that invites people to listen closer than ever before.

Margo Price’s take on classic sounds is at once familiar and daring, an infectious blend of Nashville country, Memphis soul, and Texas twang.
On May 8th, Margo Price will release “That’s How Rumours Get Started”, an album of ten new, original songs that commit her sky-high and scorching rock-and-roll show to record for the very first time. Produced by longtime friend Sturgill Simpson (co-produced by Margo and David Ferguson), the LP marks Price’s debut for Loma Vista Recordings, and whether she’s singing of motherhood or the mythologies of stardom, Nashville gentrification or the national healthcare crisis, relationships or growing pains, she’s crafted a collection of music that invites people to listen closer than ever before.

Margo primarily cut That’s How Rumors Get Started at Los Angeles’ EastWest Studios (Pet Sounds, “9 to 5”). Tracking occurred over several days while she was pregnant with daughter Ramona. “They’re both a creation process,” she says. “And I was being really good to my body and my mind during that time. I had a lot of clarity from sobriety.”

While Margo Price continued to collaborate on most of the song writing with her husband Jeremy Ivey, she recorded with an historic band assembled by Sturgill, and including guitarist Matt Sweeney (Adele, Iggy Pop), bassist Pino Palladino (D’Angelo, John Mayer), drummer James Gadson (Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye), and keyboardist Benmont Tench (Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers). Background vocals were added by Simpson on “Letting Me Down,” and the Nashville Friends Gospel Choir, who raise the arrangements of “Hey Child” and “What Happened To Our Love?” to some of the album’s most soaring heights.

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Margo Price and her steady touring band – Kevin Black (bass), Jamie Davis (guitar), Micah Hulsher (keys), and Dillon Napier (drums) – will perform songs from That’s How Rumors Get Started at dozens of shows with Chris Stapleton and The Head & The Heart this spring and summer, in addition to festival appearances and more to be announced soon. Find all dates here and below.

That’s How Rumors Get Started follows Margo’s 2017 album All American Made, which was named the #1 Country/Americana album of the year by Rolling Stone, and one of the top albums of the decade by Esquire, Pitchfork and Billboard, among others. In its wake, Margo sold out three nights at The Ryman Auditorium, earned her first Grammy nomination for Best New Artist, and much more.

Releases July 10th, 2020

 

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Margo Price has set a new release date for That’s How Rumors Get Started, her new Sturgill Simpson produced album, which will be out July 10th via Loma Vista. (It was originally set for a May release.) “Take me back to the day I started trying to paint my masterpiece so I could warn myself of what was ahead,” she says, referencing the many world-changing events of the last three months. “Time has rearranged, it has slowed down, it has manipulated things like it always does…the words to some of these songs have changed meaning, they now carry heavier weight.”
She continues: “I’ve seen the streets set ablaze, the sky set on fire. I’ve been manic, heartbroken for the world, heartbroken for the country, heartbroken from being heartbroken again and again. This album is a postcard of a landscape of a moment in time. It’s not political but maybe it will provide an escape or relief to someone who needs it. Sending love to everyone out there and hope I see you down the highway.”

With the news comes a new single, “Letting Me Down” and a video that was shot during lockdown in an old RV and at an abandoned hospital. “We bought a cheap ’80s travel trailer with a bathroom, kitchen, and a propane powered refrigerator, so we wouldn’t have to go inside anywhere for food or bathrooms,” says director Kimberly Stuckwisch. “We were able to abide by the 6-feet social distance CDC recommendation as we set up a remote head for the camera that we operated from a closet outside of the room. We wore masks the entire time and Margo supplied us with multiple bottles of hand sanitizer and spiked seltzers. We parked our RV in her driveway and worked solely out of there and the room we were filming in. We wanted to speak to what was going on at that moment, to a world that was/is shut down, to the fear we all feel, and to the hope of breaking free.” It’s a nice video, which also features choreography by Margo’s sister Kylie Price.

Margo is part of this Thursday’s John Prine livestream tribute that is also set to feature Jason Isbell, Brandi Carlile, Bonnie Raitt, Kacey Musgraves, Bill Murray, Sturgill Simpson, Iris DeMent, Jim James, Kurt Vile, Dan Auerbach, and more.

Need more? Margo recently released live album Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman which features Sturgill, Jack White, and Emmylou Harris.

Margo Price live album, margo price, perfectly imperfect at the ryman, jack white, emmylou harris, sturgill simpson, jack white, ryman auditorium, musicares covid 19 relief fund, bandcamp

Margo Price has released a new live album, “Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman”, which documents her sold-out three-night run at the iconic Nashville, TN venue in 2018. The album comes after Price announced back in March she would delay the May 8th release of her new Sturgill Simpson produced studio album, “That’s How Rumors Get Started”, due to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

“I am so excited that we are releasing it today,” said Price in a press release. “The recordings are rough and the performances are raw, but there was a magic there and the band was on fire. We played unreleased songs, alternative album versions and had lots of special guests. I hope it moves you.”

The 11-track album features collaborations with Emmylou Harris on Margo’s original, “Wild Women”, Sturgill Simpson on a rendition of Rodney Crowell‘s “Ain’t Livin Long Like This”, and Jack White on a duet of the rare White Stripes track, “Honey We Can’t Afford to Look This Cheap”. Additionally, Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman also features a “funk version” of Price’s Midwest Farmer’s Daughter track, “Weekender”, and a take on the title track of her 2017 LP, All American Made.

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“Perfectly Imperfect at The Ryman” is available now via Bandcamp. Preview the album below, scroll down for the full tracklist and credits, and purchase it for $10, All proceeds will benefit the MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund.

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I’m so excited to announce my third full length album ‘That’s How Rumors Get Started’ will be out May 8th. It was produced by my friend Sturgill Simpson and recorded in Los Angeles. I feel like it’s been a long time coming… I had a baby and felt like I fell off the face of the earth for a while. We live in strange times but I hope this brings a little light to the dark corners of the world. Watch the new music video for my new single “Twinkle Twinkle”. That’s How Rumors Get Started sees Nashville icon and 2019 Best New Artist Grammy nominee Margo Price commit her genre-bending rock-and-roll show to record for the first time, stretching out her emotive twang over sky-high soft-rock, burning psychedelic rock ballads, stomping road songs, and sprinkles of pop. With production from her friend and longtime collaborator Sturgill Simpson, it shows both of them pushing into unexpected directions.

Music video by Margo Price performing Twinkle Twinkle. © 2020 Margo Price., Under exclusive license to Loma Vista Recordings.

Country star Margo Price has always toed the line between diving backward into country music’s canon and ushering an innovative future for the genre. Luckily, she’s able to do both on her don’t-you-dare-call-it-a-slump sophomore release. All American Made. Vocally, she still pays homage to the country fore mothers to whom she’s oft compared, like Dolly Parton and Loretta Lynn. Looking ahead, however, Price expands her musical horizons past the cliché of three-chords and the truth. Her voice sounds stronger, more confident than on her wily, ragged debut, and her backing musicians help build a versatile foundation for her croons and screams.