Posts Tagged ‘Sonic Youth’

Sonic Youth are continuing to upload items to their Bandcamp archive and today it’s the live record “Hold That Tiger” which was recorded in 1987 and released in 1991. Here’s the backstory from drummer Steve Shelley:

Originally released as a semi-official bootleg LP in 1991 by friend and music writer, Byron Coley, on his Goofin’ imprint (we would eventually hijack the Goofin’ moniker for our own band-run label a few years later). The recording was nearly 60-minutes in length, so to prevent manufacturing a cost-prohibitive double lp, the master was slightly sped-up to fit the entire concert (us blasting through a finely-tuned set of songs from Sister, EVOL and a nightly encore tribute to the Ramones), on one single lp. Cramming the grooves of the vinyl in such a way resulted in “Hold That Tiger” playing at a lower volume on the stereo, thus the “one hour long – don’t have a cow! – crank it up’ sticker affixed to the front of the original lp cover. A few years later in 1998, “Hold That Tiger” was remastered for CD re-issue. The audio quality was improved from the lower fidelity lp but unfortunately the slightly sped-up performance was not corrected – until today. We are pleased to make available the best-sounding version of Hold That Tiger – SY performing full-on in 1987 – via Sonic Youth Archive on bandcamp.

“Hold That Tiger” — now at its proper speed and volume — below.

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Sonic Youth Archive is a home to live SY recordings and unreleased, self-released or stray SY recordings.

In other news: Kim Gordon is appearing on the debut album by LXB (the duo of The Cure’s Lol Tolhurst and Siouxsie/Creatures drummer Budgie); Thurston Moore has been expanding his Bandcamp archives, too, as has Lee Ranaldo.

The band recently shared a concert video from Sonic Youth‘s 1995 show at Philadelphia’s Electric Factory an amazing live video to watch while you’re home and every other show is cancelled. Perhaps with a similar idea in mind, Sonic Youth have now made eleven show recordings available on Bandcamp. They range from the late ’80s (City Gardens 1987, CBGB’s and Cabaret Metro 1988, Moscow 1989) to mid and late ’90s (The Warfield 1993, Los Angeles 1998), to the 2000s (L’Olympia 2001, Cabaret Metro Chicago 2002, The Orange Peel 2004, Daydream Nation Live in Glasgow 2007, Berlin 2009), wrapping up with the band’s final US show, in Brooklyn in 2011. Lee Ranaldo writes:

Aside from 5 previously scheduled shows in South America in November of 2011, this was the last Sonic Youth show. The last one in the USA, anyway. We were joined by opening acts Wild Flag and Kurt Vile, both of whom played terrific sets on this day. The stage was facing the East River from the Williamsburg, Brooklyn waterfront, and I recall the sun going down in the west during our set. It was a pretty magical, if kinda weird day. Fitting, somehow, that our ‘last show’ should be in New York City, our home and where it all began…

Sonic Youth live

Sonic Youth live in Brooklyn, NY at the Williamsburg Waterfront
August 12th, 2011 .Aside from 5 previously scheduled shows in South America in November of 2011, this was the last Sonic Youth show. The last one in the USA, anyway. We were joined by opening acts Wild Flag and Kurt Vile, both of whom played terrific sets on this day. The stage was facing the East River from the Williamsburg, Brooklyn waterfront, and I recall the sun going down in the west during our set. It was a pretty magical, if kinda weird day. Fitting, somehow, that our ‘last show’ should be in New York City, our home and where it all began…
Released March 25th, 2020

Thurston Moore, May 2019 (Tabatha Fireman/Getty Images for Fender Musical Instruments Corporation)

Thurston Moore has shared a cover of a New Order song, which serves as the B-side for his forthcoming trio of singles.

The Sonic Youth co-founder, who released his new album ‘Spirit Counsel’ last September , is set to drop a trio of 7-inch singles that all feature the special New Order cover, ‘Leave Me Alone’, taken from the Manchester band’s 1983 album ‘Power, Corruption & Lies’. Recorded in Salford, which Moore says “is the only place I would dare cover a New Order song, with local musicians and local pints”. “It was just one of those rare occasions, where something I wouldn’t normally do was done just for fun, and in homage and respect to the place.”

The DAYDREAM LIBRARY SERIES are ecstatic to announce the release of Thurston’s forthcoming trio of 7-inch singles:

1.) SPRING SWELLS 2.) THREE GRACES 3.) POLLINATION.

Each 7-inch comprises an excerpted moment from the Thurston Moore Group live in 2019, free-mixed and free-created by Wobbly (aka Jon Leidecker). The B-side of each is a special cover of a New Order track (recorded in Salford).

Moore releases the three singles on November 8th through his own Daydream Library Series.

Kim Gordon Delivers Ferocious Solo Debut <i>No Home Record</i>

Kim Gordon doesn’t put much stock in the superlatives that have piled up around her over the years: pioneer, visionary, icon, legend, beacon. “Being referred to as an ‘icon,’ blah blah blah,” she said recently in the New York Times. “What does that even mean?”

Fair enough, but you’d be forgiven for thinking she’s earned it. As a visual artist, co-founder of Sonic Youth, fashion designer and occasional actor, Gordon has been a magnetic, and inscrutable, focal point of indie cool for nearly 40 years. In all that time, her musical pursuits have come in group projects: 15 studio albums with Sonic Youth, three each as part of Free Kitten and Body/Head and one with Glitterbust, along with various EPs and singles scattered among them. Now, at the age of 66, Gordon steps out with No Home Record, a ferocious solo debut. It’s jagged, chaotic and mesmerizing in a way that pulls you inevitably into the thick of it, as if the songs were exerting their own inescapable gravity.

Though Gordon delivers these nine songs with supreme, unruffled confidence, there’s an unsettledness to them that reflects the sense of impermanence she has felt since moving back to Los Angeles, that most transient of cities. On “Air BnB,” the feeling manifests in the lyrics of her sardonic ode to the gig economy. She lists off amenities you might find in the web copy—something about towels, a flat-screen TV, a daybed—over gnashing guitars that sputter and grind before dropping into gear on the refrain as she wails, “Air BnB, gonna set me free.”

There’s a form of abnegation happening on “Murdered Out,” which Gordon first released as a single in 2016. She noticed that the low-rider car-culture trend of matte-black paint jobs was becoming more widely fashionable. The embrace of light-absorbing finishes struck her as “the supreme inward look, a culture collapsing in on itself, the outsider as an unwilling participant as the ‘it’ look,” she explained. Gordon pursues that idea in the lyrics, her voice alternating between breathless and abrupt on the verse and formidable full-throated keening on the refrain, accompanied by a massive, relentless beat from Warpaint drummer Stella Mozgawa and snakey blasts of guitar that writhe and churn. The overall effect is at once imposing and enthralling.

Gordon tinkers throughout with rhythms, intoning short, incisive lyrical phrases over a hypnotic mechanical beat on “Cookie Butter,” and letting the electro-clash drums on “Sketch Artist” drop out here and there for free-form interludes. Toward the end of No Home Record, she skips the beat altogether on “Earthquake,” singing in dusky tones over drifting guitars, crescendos of cymbal wash and some crumbly electronic noise in the background. It’s the most straightforward song on the album, but instead of ending there, Gordon takes one more foray into mercurial weirdness on album closer “Get Yr Life Back.” Her voice is often little more than a disquieting whisper surrounded by an eerie clanking rhythm and thickets of guitar feedback and brittle noise that blanket the song like some sinister fog.

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Despite enduring as one of post-punk’s most iconic artists thanks to her work with Sonic Youth, Free Kitten and Body/Head, Kim Gordon has still yet to release a solo album. That’ll change this week in October with No Home Record, her first full-length under her own name, to be released by Matador Records. And from the bass bombs that punctuate advance track “Sketch Artist,” it sounds like she still has some new sounds in store for longtime fans.

Kim Gordon doesn’t put much stock in the superlatives that have piled up around her over the years: pioneer, visionary, icon, legend, beacon. “Being referred to as an ‘icon,’ blah blah blah,” she said recently in the New York Times. “What does that even mean?” Fair enough, but you’d be forgiven for thinking she’s earned it. As a visual artist, co-founder of Sonic Youth, fashion designer and occasional actor, Gordon has been a magnetic, and inscrutable, focal point of indie cool for nearly 40 years. In all that time, her musical pursuits have come in group projects: 15 studio albums with Sonic Youth, three each as part of Free Kitten and Body/Head and one with Glitterbust, along with various EPs and singles scattered among them. Now, at the age of 66, Gordon steps out with No Home Record, a ferocious solo debut. It’s jagged, chaotic and mesmerizing in a way that pulls you inevitably into the thick of it, as if the songs were exerting their own inescapable gravity. Gordon tinkers throughout with rhythms, intoning short, incisive lyrical phrases over a hypnotic mechanical beat on “Cookie Butter,” and letting the electro-clash drums on “Sketch Artist” drop out here and there for free-form interludes. Toward the end of No Home Record, she skips the beat altogether on “Earthquake,” singing in dusky tones over drifting guitars, crescendos of cymbal wash and some crumbly electronic noise in the background.

No Home Record is an eclectic surge of noise: Gordon dabbles in hip-hop production, rumbling rock ‘n’ roll, noise, and art-punk. It isn’t even the most bloody, distorted parts of her music that make for the most jarring. Take the captivating opener “Sketch Artist,” where there’s a sublime shift in instrumentation; her voice carries like a cool breeze as gentle guitar plucks reveal themselves like the sun breaking through a lightning storm. These nine tracks are a collage, sonically and pictorially, of where America stands today—a flurry of genres, of sales pitches, of desperate human cries waiting to be heard.

From Kim Gordon’s new album ‘“No Home Record” released on Matador Records on October 11th.

No Home Record

More than 35 years after co-founding Sonic Youth, Kim Gordon has announced that she will release her debut solo album. The new LP – dubbed “No Home Record” – will drop on October. 11th via Matador Records.

“‘Why a solo record? And why now?,’” Gordon was questioned via press release. “I don’t know, but it wouldn’t have happened without the persistence of [producer] Justin Raisen. Living in LA the last few years it feels like home, but the transience of the place makes it feel sometimes like no home.”

The announcement comes with the music video for a new single, “Sketch Artist.” In it, Gordon portrays a ride-share driver (for a company called “Unter”), while “Broad City” star Abbi Jacobson makes a cameo.

From Kim Gordon’s new album ‘”No Home Record” released on Matador Records on October 11th.

On June 7th, we’ll be reissuing Sonic Youth’s ‘Battery Park, NYC: July 4, 2008’. Initially sold as a bonus item alongside the 2009 release of the band’s final album, ‘The Eternal’, the live recording will now be available on streaming services and as a stand-alone physical package for the first time ever. Culled from their show at Battery Park’s River To River Festival (and broadcast live on WFMU), the setlist spans the band’s 30-year career.

The live version of “Bull In The Heather” is now available

It’s out June 7 via Matador. The show was part of the free River to River Festival (and had The Feelies opening)

No one wonders why bands still love to cover “I Wanna be Your Dog” in 2014. In fact, even in its much tamer studio version, The Stooges’ feedback-heavy force of a song still out-fought most hard-rockers in ’69, only being outdone by Detroit brothers The MC5. It’s a blistering piece of proto-punk, one that set the stage for any outlandish, fuzzed-out guitar line that would follow in a garage, and Iggy Pop’s unforgettable wails—“Now I wanna be your dog!”—can’t be unheard.

“I Wanna Be Your Dog” by The Stooges is one of the nastiest, filthiest, sexiest rock blasts of all time with its repetitive and monstrous guitar drone, Iggy‘s horny barks and that single-note piano riff played by producer John Cale (then member of The Velvet Underground). The single was released back in 1969 and a couple of decades later Sonic Youth played a S-H-A-T-T-E-R-I-N-G live version on some American TV Show with a bunch of crazed guests, including a far-out saxophonist and… a mental flutist.

I Wanna Be Your Dog” is a 1969 song by the American rock band The Stooges. The song is included on their self-titled debut album. Its memorable riff, composed of only three chords (G, F♯ and E), is played continuously throughout the song (excepting two brief 4-bar bridges). The 3-minute-and-9-second-long song, with its raucous, distortion-heavy guitar intro, pounding, single-note piano riff played by producer John Cale and steady, driving beat, established The Stooges at the cutting edge example of the heavy metal and punk sound.The song notably uses sleigh bells throughout.

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The Alternative-Rock band’s fifth album was recorded in New York and released by Enigma Records. It was their last recording before they signed to a major label and received huge praise from critics. Considered to be the pinnacle of the band’s career: it fulfilled the band’s fullbore aesthetic and indulged their variegated and broad emotional palette. Few albums of the 1980s were as spectacular, influential and profound. The song’s compositions were varied and textured whilst the lyrics switched between mature reflectiveness and emotionally-charged.  Several friends of the band, including Henry Rollins, had long praised the band’s long live improvisations and told the group that its records never captured them. With Moore on a writing spree, the album ultimately had to be expanded to a double album. Sonic Youth were, 

It’s radical, political edge stunned critics at the time. It is hard to say how important the album is  and how many bands were compelled to record music because of Daydream Nation – but Sonic Youth laid down an astonishing album. Many would have liked it stretched to a triple album but that might have been excessive. It only has twelve tracks but longer numbers The Sprawl and Total Trash both exceed seven minutes whilst the finale, Trilogy, is nearly fifteen minutes in length. An essential album for those who appreciate genius music – not just reserved for Sonic Youth fans.

Rock N Roll Consciousness

“Rock n Roll Consciousness”, the new album by Thurston Moore, is set for release on April 28th on Caroline International. The album was recorded with producer Paul Epworth (Adele, The Pop Group) at The Church studios in Crouch End, London and mixed by Randall Dunn (Marissa Nadler, Earth) at Avast! in Seattle, Washington.

The songs Thurston wrote for Rock n Roll Consciousness were brought to life and galvanized by the tight bond of friendship amongst the musicians, a line-up with which he’s been working since 2014: Deb Googe (of My Bloody Valentine, Snowpony) bass, James Sedwards (Nøught, Chrome Hoof) guitar and Steve Shelley (Sonic Youth, Crucifucks) drums. The recording highlights the group’s instrumental strength and beauty following two solid years of touring 2015’s critically acclaimed The Best Day album.

Moore shares the first single off the record, titled “Smoke of Dreams” . A song that focuses on the contemplative mystery of life-defining time travel which sees Thurston recalling a New York City where spirits informed artists seeking poems of beatitude and sonic prayers of joy and wild wonder.

Rock n Roll Consciousness is released on 28th April Click here for all retail options: