Posts Tagged ‘Joy Division’

If you’re looking for a New Order live album chock full of their greatest hits, go pick up Live at the London Troxy or Live at Bestival 2012. If you’re looking for a New Order live album with a more unconventional setlist, a broader artistic vision and a 12-piece synthesizer orchestra, check out this new one, the arty-mathy, horrendously titled ?(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So it goes.

In June 2017, New Order returned to the stage at Manchester’s Old Granada Studios where Joy Division made their television debut on Tony Wilson’s So It Goes programme in 1978. For the celebrated show ?(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So it goes .., New Order deconstructed, rethought and rebuilt a wealth of material from throughout their career: familiar and obscure, old and new.

Featuring tracks such as Disorder, from Joy Divisions Unknown Pleasures and not played live for 30 years, up to 2015’s Plastic from New Order’s critically acclaimed Top 5 album Music Complete – this is the perfect document of those magical 5 nights.

The album was recorded live on 13th July 2017 and includes the full show and encore plus 3 additional tracks recorded over the residency to give listeners a full representation of the breadth of material performed.

Release Date: 12th July 2019

  • Limited Edition Triple album pressed on transparent coloured vinyl
  • Vinyl 1: Red Transparent
  • Vinyl 2: Light Green Transparent
  • Vinyl 3: Blue Transparent
  • Packaged in individual sleeves and into a hardback slipcase, all with spot gloss finish
  • 24 page 12″ sized booklet with silk finish containing exclusive imagery and text relating to the legendary event
  • Includes hi definition digital download of all 18 tracks

“There are intensely emotional scenes as New Order revisit their back catalogue on a grand scale, airing songs not heard for 30 years plus rapturously received tributes to the band’s fated predecessor, Joy Division
Guardian *****

“A perfect collision of old and new orders… a brilliantly theatrical mix”
The i News

“Outstanding… A stunning and artful setup. A highly effective marriage of synth strings and atmospheric textures that gives the songs a twist and a fresh coat of sonic paint”
Louder Than War

“A musical masterstroke with visuals to match”
Manchester Evening News

Joy Division – Closer

40th Anniversary Edition 180gm Crystal Clear Vinyl LP, Deluxe 12″ Singles

Joy Division recorded only two albums before singer Ian Curtis tragically took his own life in 1980, 40 years ago next week. But what the Manchester quartet lacked in longevity, they more than made up for in quality. The two albums were pioneering and helped shape the sound and mood of the alternative music that followed in the band’s wake.

Joy Division will be reissuing a 40th Anniversary Edition of their sophomore album “Closer”, pressed on 180gm Crystal Clear Vinyl LP, alongside Deluxe 12″ Singles of Atmosphere, Transmission and Love Will Tear Us Apart. Joy Division are reissuing their sophomore alongside some essential 12″ singles. thought you ought to know.

There were no singles from Closer The same day will also see the reissue of three non-album singles, “Transmission”, “Atmosphere” and “Love Will Tear Us Apart” on 180g 12-inch vinyl with remastered audio. These singles have never been repressed or reissued since Factory Records closed. Closer was of course the band’s last album. It was issued two months after Ian Curtis’ suicide (he died on 18th May 1980).  The Closer album isn’t remastered and uses the same mastering as on the 2015 vinyl reissues (which is from 2007).

Check out the new Closer packaging and watch a teaser video – and be sure to pick up the next issue of Uncut Magazine, out next week, which features the surviving members of Joy Division looking back at the making of “Love Will Tear Us Apart”.

Joy Division: Closer: 40th Anniversary Vinyl Bundle

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April 28th, 1980: Joy Division are in a disused T.J.Davidson rehearsal studio in Manchester filming their video for “Love Will Tear Us Apart.”

On this day, 40 years ago, Peter Hook, Bernard Sumner and Stephen Morris entered TJ Davidson’s Studios and turned on the cameras for the recording of “Love Will Tear Us Apart”, the only promotion video Joy Division ever recorded.

The clip was recorded by the band themselves during a rehearsal at T.J. Davidson’s studio on Little Peter Street in Manchester. The T.J. Davidson studios had already housed the band’s rehearsals at the beginning of their career.

The curiosities remain: In the intro to the video the door that opens and shuts has ‘Ian C’ carved into it; reportedly this was the beginning of an abusive message (the rest later erased) carved into the door by a spurned ex-girlfriend of Curtis’ during the band’s earlier work at the studio.
The video is browned out at points, unintentionally, but nevertheless a fitting aesthetic — along with the omission of Curtis’ trademark dancing, which instead is replaced with the frontman strumming on a Vox Phantom VI six string british guitar.

Official video for Love Will Tear Us Apart by Joy Division

Warner Music will issue a limited edition 40th anniversary version coloured vinyl edition of Joy Division‘s debut studio album “Unknown Pleasures” next month.

The album will be pressed on ‘ruby red’ 180g vinyl and will come packaged in alternative artwork – a white sleeve that resembles the original Peter Saville design concept.

In June 1979, Joy Division released the bleak masterpiece that is ‘Unknown Pleasures’, a record so majestic it changed the face of music. There can’t be many people left in the civilised world who haven’t, at one time or another, sat down and discussed the influence of ‘Unknown Pleasures’ over the last few decades. But reeling off a list of indebted bands that’s longer than time itself is now only one facet of why Joy Division’s first album is so significant.

The story of how Bernard Sumner, Peter Hook, Stephen Morris and Ian Curtis teamed up with their peerlessly innovative producer Martin Hannett to make the album is so fascinating that it has provided for more books that most people will read in their lives. That’s to say nothing of the numerous documentaries which have provided a nice little earner on the talking head circuit for anyone who spent more than two weeks in Manchester during the late 1970s. Let’s not forget the two major motion pictures — 24 Hour Party People and Control — that also depicted the album’s recording and which were widely celebrated for it.

This August will see Joy Division’s legendary bass player Peter Hook join forces with The Metropolitan Orchestra to bring his brand new project Joy Division Orchestrated to Australia. The shows will see classic tracks from the seminal UK post-punk outfit performed in a new light with a full orchestral arrangement. This is the first time that an original member of the group has taken part in such a project.

Ahead of the tour, we’ve decided to look back at the group’s 1979 seminal album Unknown Pleasures and the key players outside of the band – Hook, frontman Ian Curtis, drummer Stephen Morris, and guitarist Bernard Sumner – who helped shape the classic release.

Peter Saville – graphic designer

Even if you’re not familiar with the album itself, chances are you’ve seen its cover across someone’s t-shirt in Fitzroy, Newtown or anywhere else across the globe. Saville’s work goes much further than just Joy Division, and subsequently New Order, having gone on to produce artwork for the likes of Peter Gabriel (1986’s So), Martha & The Muffins (1980’s Metro Music), Wham! (1986’s Music From The Edge Of Heaven), Roxy Music (1980’s Flesh & Blood). He was a founding member of Factory Records, the label that would release Joy Division’s work. Last year, he redesigned Burberry’s logo and just this week, he walked the catwalk for Ferragamo.

Martin Hannett – producer

Hannett first met Hook, Curtis and Sumner between 1976 and 1977, when they first appeared as Warsaw and he was booking shows around Manchester; he added Warsaw to his roster soon after. In 1978, Hannett would first work with the group to produce their tracks Digital and Glass. Hannett would ultimately go on to record both Unknown Pleasures and their final work, Closer. He was tasked with producing U2’s debut album, Boy, but passed up the opportunity following the death of Curtis. Hannett work continues to influence long after his own death in 1991, at age 42, helping shape tracks from artists like Happy Mondays, Buzzcocks, Stone Roses and more in their formative years.

Rob Gretton – manager

Gretton met the group soon after they began booking shows with Hannett; it was during 1977 that they crossed paths at Rafters where Gretton was the venue’s resident DJ. He’d recently began managing local acts and the newly renamed Joy Division soon joined this roster. Gretton scored rights for the group’sIdeal For Living back from RCA Records early on and was fundamental in the transition from Joy Division to New Order. Following the dissolution of Factory Records in the ‘90s, he started his own Rob’s Records.

Tony Wilson & Alan Erasmus – Factory Records co-founders

Perhaps at the centre of the Joy Division world is the iconic, and infamous, Factory Records; the label that launched them. Founded in 1978, the label would go on to helm the Madchester music scene, in part through its influence with nightclub The Haçienda, which was co-owned by the members of New Order. Wilson would pass away in 2007, following a long career as a journalist in addition to his many music industry roles. Erasmus has kept a pretty low profile since the closure of Factory Records.

This new coloured vinyl edition of Unknown Pleasures will be released on 14th June 2019.

Lvy524

More stunning live material to come out of the vaults...Ian Curtis, Peter Hook and company recorded this live at the legendary Les Bains Douches in Paris on December 18th, 1979. Containing great versions of Love Will Tear Us Apart, Shadowplay, Atmosphere, Transmission, and more, this is one of the most classic live sets of the group’s storied career.

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In January of 1980 Joy Division kicked off a tour of The Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany with a show at the legendary Paradiso Club in Amsterdam. Little did anyone know that in less than 6 months, Ian Curtis would be dead, and the brief, brilliant run of the group would be over. This is a particularly heavy and deep set, with the band performing at their angular best, and Curtis in top form vocally. Essential live broadcast for any fan of Joy Division.

If you are not already acquainted with this gig at Paradiso in Amsterdam in 1980. Here’s some info from a blog. “The local support didn’t want to play so Joy Division stood in for them. They played two completely different sets for the price of one.” And how it was described in a fanzine at the time: ‘When I arrived at the Paradiso, it appeared that most of the regular visitors had decided to stay at home.

So the JOY DIVISION played for a handful of people only, two long sets, together around 70 minutes of excellent music. At that time only the first album and two singles had been released, so they played a lot of new songs that went down well with the small audience. The gig was (along with the PIL-gig in Bruxelles) the best I have ever seen. Fantastic bass playing by Peter Hook and a strained Ian Curtis.  The Paradiso management had lowered the ceiling to make things more intimate. It was a good idea. Shame to all the people who stayed at home’ SJC This is the most bootlegged live Joy Division show, but I’m not sure any of the bootlegs have sound this good. If they do, I certainly want to snag a copy.

Check the intensity on the live versions of tracks like “Transmission,” “Digital,” and “Disorder,” plus “A Means To An End,” “These Days,” and the timeless “Love Will Tear Us Apart.” 

The British group Joy Division wrote and recorded 43 songs and played over 120 shows in just 29 months between 1978 and 1980.

Having successfully toured the albums from Hooky’s previous bands for over eight years now, Peter Hook & the Light  have now reached the late eighties and early nineties albums of new order, “Technique” and “Republic” in their consecutive run and have announced a raft of new concert dates.

As has become their custom, all dates feature the Light performing an opening set of Joy Division material. 

‘Technique’, New Order’s fifth studio album chronicles the impact of acid house on the band, marking the clearest statement of the rock and dance influences which were shaping their output. released in january 1989, just after the bands infamous G-mex gig and aftershow downstairs at the Hacienda in december the previous year, it became New Order’s first album to go to number one in the UK. it was also hugely successful in the united states where the influence of Quincy Jones’ Qwest label regularly got the band’s singles to the top of the american dance charts, ‘Technique’ was driven by the classic acid house single “fine time” which rivals “Blue Monday” as probably the most openly dance orientated record the group ever produced whilst other tracks on the lp “Round and Round”, “Mr disco” and “Vanishing Point” also reflect the dance sensibilities then fusing their way into New Order’s sound. yet like on its predecessor, “Brotherhood”, these are balanced by the vocal led, more rock leaning “All the Way”, “Gulity Partner” and “Run”.

legendarily recorded in ibiza in 1988, ‘Technique’ has often been observed to capture the sound of that summer and the heady period back them both on the island and in the uk and of course, Manchester. as is widely known, the band didn’t actually do much work in ibiza, a jaunt that Factory label boss Tony Wilson once told Peter Hook “was the most expensive f*cking holiday you’ve ever been on”. the band returned to the UK to finish the lp at Bath’s Real World studios later in 1988, itself the scene of another legendary New Order party when recording was completed.

In many ways, ‘Technique’ epitomised its time and the culture surrounding it. it came out to generally ecstatic reviews from the top notch echelons of the music press. in the uk, melody maker called it “a rare and ravishing triumph” whilst nme proclaimed the band “had fashioned an lp of rare and unflinching honesty”. across in the states, spin called it New Order’s best ever album, rolling stone referred to its “sonic presence with immaculate playing” and pitchfork sum up the album simply as “magnificent.”

“placed in the perfect position to deliver the definitive alternative take on house music, the band produced another classic record” – all music

Many consider ‘Technique’ to mark the high point of New Order and as they went on from the album to headline Reading festival in august 1989, before going on hiatus and also pursuing their solo projects, this is generally thought of as the golden period for the band.

due to the well documented history surrounding ‘Republic’, it is remarkably difficult to characterise it as sharing the same sunny outlook as ‘Technique’ but Hooky’s decision to include it in these concerts underline his commitment to perform all of his catalogue that he has committed to record. Not that ‘Republic’ wasn’t hugely successful. again it went to number one in the UK and became the band’s biggest ever selling album in america, narrowly missing the billboard album chart top ten peaking at number 11.

however it is not unknown that it was new order’s most difficult album to make. Factory records had hit financial trouble and needed a new order album to bail themselves out so the band were coerced into recording the album in to save Factory. something that didn’t entirely work out as Factory was then to go bankrupt in november 1992 and New Order then signed to London Records, an offshoot of warner bros with ‘republic’ released in may 1993.

The band roared back with first single “Regret”, still thought of as one of their finest ever, and subsequent singles “Ruined in a Day” and “World” did well, both in their original versions and as remixes which again dominated the dance charts.

It’s not hard to deduce that the demise of Factory, coupled with the ongoing difficulties surrounding the band’s involvement in Manchester’s Hacienda as well as internal friction within New Order and due to the band members’ solo projects, all had an impact on the recording sessions and mood that lies behind “republic, something that Stephen Hague did his utmost to assuage in producing the lp.

Still considered a worthwhile addition by fans to New Order’s catalogue, yet, if not perhaps hitting the standards they had previously set for themselves, ‘Republic’ did receive some strong reviews. nme’s dele fadele awarded it 8/10 on release whilst all music commented that “‘Republic’ simply borrows elements of contemporary innovations in club music to frame a set of effortlessly enjoyable alternative pop songs.”

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Philadelphian indie quartet The Districts have shared a cover of Joy Division’s famous 1980 single, “Love Will Tear Us Apart.”

The band’s cover is accompanied by a series of moving, flashing images of scientists performing ominous experiments. The Districts frontman Rob Grote adds a more animated take on Ian Curtis’ famously strange deadpan vocals while the band turns Joy Division’s jolting post-punk into a warm, indie-rock sound that Districts fans will recognize in an instant.

The Districts recently released a limited edition 7”, “Nighttime Girls” backed by b-side “Soft Auxiliary,” via their Bandcamp page. “Nighttime Girls” is a gritty garage-pop/rock tune, which the band says is “about the allure of escapism and a character’s general preoccupation with shallowness and neon light.”

After touring with Chicago’s Twin Peaks in support of The District’s 2017 LP, Popular Manipulations, they’ll be making a stop at various Festival’s, as well as some additional headlining shows and festivals across the U.K. and Europe.

The band’s latest album, Popular Manipulations resembles a sunset that’s far more than ordinary, the red sky at night before the darkness of the latest hours. It’s an album thats not letting anyone down.”

The Districts cover Joy Division’s classic “Love Will Tear Us Apart” along with moving images.

Peter Hook will release four new live albums this spring on CD, digital and vinyl, each capturing a performance of a different full album  Joy Division’s “Unknown Pleasures” and “Closer”, and New Order’s “Movement” and “Power, Corruption & Lies” — recorded over the past few years.

The albums will first be released as limited-edition colored-vinyl pressings on Record Store Day 2017 on April 22nd. A worldwide CD and digital release will follow on May 5th.

Unknown Pleasures Tour 2012: Live in Leeds,

Closer Live Tour 2011: Live in Manchester,

Movement Tour 2013: Live in Dublin,

Power, Corruption & Lies Tour 2013: Live in Dublin 

Full tracklists have not yet been released, but each live album features a full performance of that partcular record by Peter Hook & The Light, plus additional era-appropriate tracks fleshing out the sets.

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LOW – ” Transmission “

Posted: September 11, 2015 in MUSIC
Tags: , , ,

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18 years ago the Minnesota slowcore vets, Low, released their Transmission Ep. At six tracks it housed two covers – “Jack Smith” (a Supreme Dicks cover), and a glacial rendition of Joy Division’s “Transmission“, from which the Ep took its name.

To celebrate the 35th anniversary of the release of “Love Will Tear Us Apart,” Rhino has re-issued four iconic Joy Division albums on heavyweight 180-gram vinyl. Each design replicates the original in painstaking detail, including the gatefold covers used for Still and Substance. The music heard on the albums was remastered in 2007 when Rhino introduced expanded versions of the albums.

Joy Division recorded two albums, Unknown Pleasures and Closer, before singer Ian Curtis tragically took his own life in 1980. But what the Manchester quartet lacked in longevity, it more than made up for in quality. The band’s only two studio albums were groundbreaking and helped shape the sound and mood of the alternative music that followed in the band’s wake.

The compilations Still and Substance fill in the missing pieces of the band’s history with non-album singles (“Transmission” and “Love Will Tear Us Apart”), unreleased studio tracks (“Something Must Break” and “Ice Age”), and choice live recordings (“Disorder” and the only performance of “Ceremony.”)