Posts Tagged ‘New Order’

New Order have officially announced Education Entertainment Recreation, a new live album and concert film recorded during the band’s sole UK show of 2018, held at Alexandra Palace. The career-spanning performance is being released on 2xCD, 2xCD with Blu-Ray, 3xLP, and as a limited edition box set with the aforementioned physical formats plus a book and art prints. Education Entertainment Recreation arrives May 7th via Mute; below, find a previously released clip of “Sub-Culture” from the film release.

New Order released a new song called “Be a Rebel” last fall. A music video by Spanish director NYSU was revealed in December. Their last full-length studio album Music Complete arrived in 2015. Recorded live on 9th November 2018 (their only UK show of 2018), ‘education entertainment recreation’is a brand new live album from London’s Alexandra Palace. Sonically spectacular, spanning 2 hours 20 minutes, the show joyously mixed New Order classics, their latest acclaimed album ‘Music Complete’ and Joy Division’s finest.

Opening with ‘Singularity’ from ‘Music Complete’, they eased back in time to 1993’s ‘Regret’, to ‘Love Vigilantes’ from 1985’s ‘Low-Life’ to ‘Ultraviolence from 1983 debut ‘Power, Corruption and Lies’. Later, their power over the dance floor was proven by sublime performances in the manner of the celebrated extended 12 inch remixes they are synonymous with – on ‘True Faith’, ‘Blue Monday’ and ‘Temptation’ before a four song Joy Division mini set to end

A career spanning celebration, the band were on relentlessly sparkling form, blending eras and genres and redefining themselves as perhaps the most vital British band of recent decades.
This spectacular live album is spread across various formats, a triple 180 gram edition, a 2CD edition or a 2CD + film on BluRay edition.

The Times *****: “the pristine power of the band….filled the sometimes unforgiving space of Alexandra Palace quite magnificently”

Clash: “a celebration of innovation, fabulous tunes and a career that has mined gold from tragedy”

New Order are:
Bernard Sumner – lead vocals, guitar
Stephen Morris – drums
Gillian Gilbert – keyboards
Phil Cunningham – guitars
Tom Chapman – bass

New Order might be touring without him, but that hasn’t stopped former NE/Joy Division bassist Peter Hook from getting on with his life and getting out on the road. Peter Hook & the Light is the band, and he performs material by both of those iconic and vital bands. Hook’s groups have always been ahead of the game, so a virtual show won’t phase him. The lawsuits are behind him, and Peter Hook has seen the Light.

As part of the recent Yamaha Guitars ‘Open House Online’ event, Peter Hook & The Light performed a socially distanced live version of Joy Division’s ‘Love Will Tear Us Apart’. Peter Hook is playing his brand new upcoming signature Yamaha BB bass in this video. For more information on this, go here: https://uk.yamaha.com/en/products/mus…​ His son Jack is playing a Yamaha BB734A, while David Potts is playing a Yamaha Revstar.

Peter Hook & The Light are: Peter Hook – Vocals/Bass David Potts – Vocals/Guitar Jack Bates – Bass Martin Rebelski – Keys Paul Kehoe – Drums

New Order are one of the most unlikely success stories. When Joy Division frontman Ian Curtis committed suicide on May 18th, 1980 on the eve of their first U.S. tour, the three remaining members of the band — guitarist Bernard Sumner, bassist Peter Hook and drummer Stephen Morris — decided to carry on as New Order, drafting Morris’ girlfriend Gillian Gilbert on guitars and keyboards later that year. Though their first album, “Movement”, would be heavily indebted to Joy Division’s spectre, their interest in synthesizers — and their frequent trips to New York — would quickly change their sound. 1983’s landmark single “Blue Monday” -is still the best-selling 12″ single of all time — set them down a path as club hitmakers, and sunny synthpop tracks like “Bizarre Love Triangle” and “The Perfect Kiss” could not be any further away from Joy Division’s original stark, morose sound.

Through all this, New Order remained one of the most idiosyncratic bands of the ’80s, refusing to put singles on albums, shying away from press interviews and generally not appearing on camera in their music videos. They also never put away their rock band instruments and did more interesting things with guitar, bass and drums than most of their peers at the time. Their catalogue is robust and full of great songs — many of which easily could’ve been singles beyond the obvious ones that everyone knows.

With their 40th anniversary this year, Here are some of New Order’s best deep cuts, which are essential listening to anyone who already loves “Blue Monday,” “Love Vigilantes,” “Age of Consent,” “Ceremony,” “True Faith” or “Regret.” They range from indie-guitar pop, to club-ready bangers, and the kind of moody, introspective dance-rock hybrids that could’ve only be made by them.

“Power, Corruption & Lies” and “Low-Life” are just perfect albums, and Side 2 of “Technique” is up there too. I also stuck with the original 1980 – 1993 era of the band. The records from the 2000s-on, no non-single song from that era really seemed worthy of this list.

New Order — who are still an active band (though without Peter Hook since they reformed in 2011) — are a fantastic singles band, and everyone should own “Substance” there’s so much more beyond “Blue Monday.”

“Dreams Never End” (1981)

New Order were still underneath the shadow of Joy Division in 1981, a hard shackle to shake. Unsure how to progress after the death of Ian Curtis, both guitarist Bernard Sumner and Peter Hook sing lead on New Order’s debut album, “Movement”, and both sound like they’re trying to mimic him. “Dreams Never End,” which features Hooky on vocals, is musically bright and sunny, with Hook, Sumner and Gilbert’s instruments swirling around Stephen Morris’ insistent, danceable beat. The Cure would crib liberally from this for their 1986 single “Inbetween Days.

“Procession” (1981)

Following their debut single, “Ceremony” (which had been played live with Joy Division), their next release was “Procession” which felt like a natural progression from Joy Division’s Closer, with glacial synths washing over a frantic rhythm section and Bernard Sumner’s brittle guitars. Recorded and released before Movement, “Procession” nonetheless feels past it, with Bernard Sumner coming into his own as lead vocalist. While a single, “Procession” didn’t make it on to the main track list for 1987’s Substance, but was instead relegated to the bonus disc of the CD. But it’s a pivotal song in their evolution.

“Turn the Heater On” (1982 John Peel Session)

Keith Hudson’s “Turn the Heater On” was Ian Curtis’ favorite reggae song, says Peter Hook in his Substance memoir, saying it was where Bernard Sumner “got the got the idea for using the melodica,” an instrument which would turn up in New Order songs like “Your Silent Face” and “Love Vigilantes.” Barney’s only playing guitar at the end, after he’s stopped singing,” adds Hook, only kinda joking that “That became the whole template for the band.”

“The Village” (1983)

Power, Corruption & Lies is a perfect record, and none of the songs were released as singles — “Blue Monday” was tacked onto the U.S. CD release — so every song could theoretically fit on this list. There are moments of sadness and desolation, but there are also songs of unabashed joy. In much the same spirit as “Age of Consent,” “The Village” bounces along like the first day of spring with Sumner singing “Our love is like the flowers / The rain, the sea and the hours.” The mid-section instrumental — with guitars, synthesizers and drum machines joining forces — remains one of New Order’s most magical moments.

“The synths are incredible from 1:45 so in your face but not overpowering … then they disappear – my whole taste in music seemed to change because of this song” – The Charlatan’s Tim Burgess on “The Village”

“Leave Me Alone” (1983)

Many of New Order’s most genius moments come from the interplay between Peter Hook’s bass — which is almost always played high up on the neck to where some mistake it for guitar — and Bernard Sumner’s guitar. Is there a more perfect example than on Power Corruption & Lies’ closing track? The bass hook opens the song, but it’s when the chiming guitar lead enters that “Leave Me Alone” truly blooms. (Gillian Gilbert adds further, crucial, counterpoint guitar lines.) A grey-hued portrait of loneliness (“On a thousand islands in the sea / I see a thousand people just like me”), it’s one of New Order’s crowning achievements, fading out with two more minutes of gorgeous instrumental melancholia.

“Thieves Like Us” (1984)

This is the big concession to the singles rule on this list. While “Thieves Like Us” went to No#18 in the UK in 1984, it does not have the stature of “Bizarre Love Triangle,” “Temptation,” “Blue Monday,” “Sub-Culture,” “True Faith” or even LP tracks like “Age of Consent” or “Love Vigilantes.” But it is one of New Order’s best, most deeply emotive songs — it’s Peter Hook’s favourite track — that needs all six minutes and 36 seconds to work its magic. Bernard Sumner’s vocals doesn’t even come in till two-and-a-half minutes into the song, long after we’ve been seduced by the song’s NYC hip-hop inspired rhythm section and majestic washes of synths. While the song works well as an instrumental — it plays over the “making the dress” montage in Pretty in Pink — Sumner gives a great delivery with a whole lot of “Loves,” in his signature, fragile style.

“Lonesome Tonight” (1984)

“Lonesome Tonight” is, according to Peter Hook, New Order’s ode to Elvis Presley. Bernard Sumner was apparently obsessed with a version of “Lonesome Tonight” (where The King can’t stop laughing) and suggested to the rest of New Order they try jamming it on stage one night. That bit of C-F chord improvisation became this song, which Hook calls “a glorious tune even though it’s nothing like Elvis’, given away in true fashion as a b-side.” (It’s the flip to “Thieves Like Us.”) New Order rarely needed more than two chords to create something amazing (see all of Power, Corruption and Lies), and when the synthesizers crest halfway through, it evokes Joy Division’s “Atmosphere.” If you’re wondering, that is Peter Hook clearing his sinuses at the four-minute mark. “When Barney heard me hocking up phlegm into a handkerchief he suggested we put it on at the end because the contrast between something so beautiful and something so awful might be interesting. He was absolutely right.”

“Murder” (1984)

New Order have always had a way with instrumentals and this one’s a real tour-de-force, a pounding goth nightmare powered by Stephen Morris’ propulsive drumming, a sinister bass line from Hook and Sumner’s three-note, cyclical guitar hook. The song also makes great, creepy use of movie samples of Hal in 2001: A Space Odyssey and Malcolm McDowell in infamous big-budget softcore film Caligula. “Murder,” which has been covered by The Charlatans and K-X-P, was originally only released as a single in Belgium, but later appeared on the second disc of the Substance two-CD set.

“Elegia” (full version) (1985)

An ode to Ennio Morricone’s spaghetti western scores, specifically the pocket watch scene from A Few Dollars More, “Elegia” opens side two of 1985’s highly underrated “Low-Life”. While the five-minute instrumental is carefully paced, exploding into full Sergio Leone glory in the last minute, the original 17-minute version is even better. “Dylan Jones – then editor at id magazine –asked us if we’d like to do some music for a short 15-20 min art film,” Stephen Morris says. “We went into a studio in Wembley and did a marathon all night session. The film never happened, but we liked ‘Elegia’ so much it got edited down to fit on the LP.” As Morris says, “Hooky’s bass melodies on ‘Elegia’ are majestic.”

“Elegia” is one of three New Order tracks to also appear in Pretty in Pink (“Thieves Like Us” and “Shellshock” which appears on the soundtrack album, are the others), and you may have also heard it in Stranger Things, and the trailer for video game “Metal Gear Solid 5: Phantom Pain.”

“Sooner Than You Think” (1985)

Like “Power, Corruption and Lies”, “Low-Life” is a near-perfect album and picking from the many great songs is difficult. Following “Blue Monday” and “Thieves Like Us,” New Order really came into their own as far as blending rock and club music. While the albums that follow would more often than not have songs that were either “rock” or “synth,” Low-Life let things intermingle in wonderful and surprising ways. After a building, minute-long intro that is mostly guitar, bass and drums, “Sooner Than You Think” shifts gears and lets the keyboards take over. “A very unusual tune, showing exactly why I used to love New Order,” says Peter Hook in his memoir. “We were so versatile.” As the lyrics describe, the song was actually written after “a party in [New Order’s] hotel” in Zurich in 1984. “I think some members of the Furious Five were there, no Grandmaster Flash,” recalls Stephen Morris. “There was a very loud blaster in a very small room – other hotel guests were not amused – complaints were made, maybe I dreamt the Furious Five bit? But not the Swiss police though.”

Here’s a cool live in the studio version with Bernard Sumner wearing some very ’80s shorts:

“Face Up” (1985)

This one should’ve been a single. “When we first wrote “Face up” in early 1984 we thought it was the best thing ever,” says Stephen Morris. “Face Up” is another New Order song where two disparate parts have been grafted together, with an an atmospheric intro (“inspired by Caligula” says Hook) that then drastically shifts gears into music that all but demands you bounce up and down. Sonically, “Face Up” is pure ebullience, the kind few besides New Order can do with guitars, but the lyrics — “Oh how I cannot bear the thought of you” — are a decided kiss-off from a spurned lover. “I couldn’t understand why some people didn’t get Face Up’s euphoria, but maybe you had to be playing the drums to fully get that,” adds Morris.

“Way of Life” (1986)

As the ’80s progressed, New Order became more and more known as a synth pop band, but they remained a clever, inventive rock band on album tracks, as is evidenced by the entire first side of 1986’s Brotherhood. “Way of Life” closes out Side A, beginning with another gloomy fake-out intro before blossoming into a wonderful pop song with a chorus so infectious it seems impossible they would bury it this deep into the album. Hook says “We were trying to emulate ‘Age of Consent’ so I just played the riff backwards, and voilà.

“Every Little Counts” (1986)

New Order were guilty a few times over the years of what Peter Hook calls “five o’clock in the morning lyrics.” Sometimes that meant something special, like “you caught me at a bad time, so why don’t you piss off” (Power, Corruption & Lies’ “Your Silent Face”) and sometimes it gives you the opening lines to Brotherhood’s closing track. “Every second counts when I am with you / I think you are a pig, you should be in a zoo,” which Bernard Sumner cannot get through without laughing. (He also didn’t feel a need to do another take.) And yet, “Every Second Counts” is still pure gold, making great use of orchestral samples, harmony and Sumner’s winning “do de do de dooh” chorus. “Every Little Counts” is also a perfect album-closer, with a massive, woozy swell from their Emulator sampling keyboard — “with Barney holding all the keys down at once, using both arms” — and then a great final joke that definitely freaked out some vinyl listeners at the time.

“1963” (1987)

Like “The Perfect Kiss,” this b-side to 1987 single “True Faith” is a story-song about a doomed relationship — and perhaps firearms — set to ultra-catchy crystalline synth pop. There’s a case to be made that it’s better than the A-side (which was one of New Order’s biggest hits and their first entry into the Billboard Top 40). For people like Peter Hook who wished more of Peter Hook’s distinctive bass stylings made it into the the final product (it doesn’t show up till right before the slow fade out), Arthur Baker’s sublime remix adds in more string instruments — bass and guitar — throughout.

“Vanishing Point” (1989)

Both Stephen Morris and Peter Hook’s favorite song on 1989’s Technique, “Vanishing Point” is one of New Order’s finest electronic dance songs (and it really should’ve been a single instead of either “Fine Time” or “Run”). Like “Thieves Like Us,” this one is in no hurry to get to vocals, with the 90 second lead-in playing like an overture, leading us through the major melodic points; when Sumner does begin with “Grow up children don’t you suffer / at the hands of one another” it’s a cinematic experience. “Vanishing Point” has the best chorus on the album and the best breakdown and “drop” (before they called them that), that was clearly influenced by the two months spent in Ibiza making the album (and spending a lot of time at the clubs).

“Dream Attack” (1989)

The dance and rock tracks on Technique mostly stay in their individual lanes, but the album closes with the glorious “Dream Attack” that brings the whole record together, mixing ragged guitar solos, windswept acoustic guitars, sampled orchestra hits, sequencers and live drums — plus another great chorus — all together as only New Order can do. Bernard Sumner apparently had The Eagles’ “Hotel California” in mind with the song’s two-minute jam outro which, in their hands, works. Gillian Gilbert, who played those wonderful acoustic guitars, says, “To me, Dream Attack’ sums up the whole album. It’s bright breezy and uplifting…a good song to walk off into the sunset to.”

“Special” (1993)

New Order were not especially getting along in the early-’90s, but got back together to make a new album, as they were low on funds after their label Factory Records (which went belly-up the year prior) and their troubled Manchester club, The Hacienda, depleted their bank accounts. “Republic” was, by all accounts, not the most pleasant recording experience with Bernard Sumner and Peter Hook butting heads constantly. There’s not much of Hook’s signature bass on the album, but there is some unfortunate rapping by Sumner. Republic does contain “Regret,” one of their best-ever singles (a Top 40 hit in the US), and some of the old magic can also be found tucked away near the end of Side 2 with the sultry, moody “Special,” which is driven by Hook’s bass and another great chorus. Lyrically the song is perhaps referencing the demise of Factory Records or the group itself: “It was always special, like water down the drain.” New Order went on an eight-year hiatus not long after its release.

Both New Order and Joy Division were among the most successful artists on the Factory Records label, run by Granada television personality Tony Wilson, and partnered with Factory in the financing of the Manchester club The Haçienda. Speaking in 2009, fellow synthpop musician Phil Oakey described New Order’s slow-burn career as cult musicians as being unusually prolonged and effective: “If you want to make a lot of money out of pop, be number 3 a lot. Like New Order did

Peter Hook suggested that the band should stop touring. In early May 2007, Hook was interviewed by British radio originally to talk about his contribution to the debut album of Jane’s Addiction singer Perry Farrell’s new band Satellite Party – and stated that “Me and Bernard aren’t working together.” Further complicating the news, a website with support from New Order management, reported that according to “a source close to the band”, “The news about the split is false… New Order still exists despite what [Hook] said … Peter Hook can leave the band, but this doesn’t mean the end of New Order.” However, Sumner revealed in 2009 that he no longer wished to make music as New Order.

NEW ORDER – ” Be a Rebel “

Posted: September 8, 2020 in MUSIC
Tags: ,

New Order Be a Rebel new song stream new music, photo by Warren Jackson

Since dropping their excellent album Music Complete in 2015, New Order have been zoned in on special reissues like their upcoming Power, Corruption, & Lies box set instead of recording new music. But that changes today with the release of “Be a Rebel”, a brand new single and their first original music in five years.

“Be a Rebel” was originally planned to be released during New Order’s autumn tour, but the band had to postpone those dates due to the ongoing coronavirus. They’ve decided to share the track digitally anyway to uplift listeners. It’ll receive a physical release on 12-inch vinyl and CD with remixes at a later date as well.
“In tough times we wanted to reach out with a new song,” said Bernard Sumner in a statement. “We can’t play live for a while, but music is still something we can all share together. We hope you enjoy it… until we meet again.”

Fittingly, “Be a Rebel” sounds like the exact type of glittery, uptempo, hype-worthy song that would bring a live crowd to their feet to dance. Over a skittering beat and an enthusiastic synthpop melody, Sumner sings about overcoming a downer mood and pushing back against the norm. Little did they do such motivational lyrical themes would be necessary now more than ever for listeners.

Thankfully, you can eventually hear this song live next year when New Order and Pet Shop Boys kick off their rescheduled co-headlining tour. Those “Unity Tour” dates are currently planned for September and October of 2021,

Available on ‘dove grey’ coloured vinyl, packaged with a blue metallic ink outer sleeve and full colour inner sleeve. Includes a high definition download code. It features additional remixes from the band’s own Bernard Sumner and Stephen Morris.

New Order will release a new vinyl pressing of the group’s 1982 studio session with legendary BBC broadcaster John Peel on Record Store Day this year, complete with what is being advertised as a new sleeve created by the band’s long time graphic designer Peter Saville.

The four-track The John Peel Session 1982 EP will be released in both the U.S. and U.K., and features two songs from Power, Corruption & Lies, plus an original, “Too Late,” that was never recorded or released elsewhere, and a cover of reggae singer Keith Hudson’s “Turn the Heater On.”

Now in its 12th year, Record Store Day falls on August 29th (delayed by coronavirus) this year. Head over to the recordstoreday.com and recordstoreday.co.uk websites to see full lists of exclusive, limited-run and “RSD First” releases along with participating record stores in the U.S. and the U.K., respectively.

recordstore day

If you’re looking for a New Order live album chock full of their greatest hits, go pick up Live at the London Troxy or Live at Bestival 2012. If you’re looking for a New Order live album with a more unconventional setlist, a broader artistic vision and a 12-piece synthesizer orchestra, check out this new one, the arty-mathy, horrendously titled ?(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So it goes.

In June 2017, New Order returned to the stage at Manchester’s Old Granada Studios where Joy Division made their television debut on Tony Wilson’s So It Goes programme in 1978. For the celebrated show ?(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So it goes .., New Order deconstructed, rethought and rebuilt a wealth of material from throughout their career: familiar and obscure, old and new.

Featuring tracks such as Disorder, from Joy Divisions Unknown Pleasures and not played live for 30 years, up to 2015’s Plastic from New Order’s critically acclaimed Top 5 album Music Complete – this is the perfect document of those magical 5 nights.

The album was recorded live on 13th July 2017 and includes the full show and encore plus 3 additional tracks recorded over the residency to give listeners a full representation of the breadth of material performed.

Release Date: 12th July 2019

  • Limited Edition Triple album pressed on transparent coloured vinyl
  • Vinyl 1: Red Transparent
  • Vinyl 2: Light Green Transparent
  • Vinyl 3: Blue Transparent
  • Packaged in individual sleeves and into a hardback slipcase, all with spot gloss finish
  • 24 page 12″ sized booklet with silk finish containing exclusive imagery and text relating to the legendary event
  • Includes hi definition digital download of all 18 tracks

“There are intensely emotional scenes as New Order revisit their back catalogue on a grand scale, airing songs not heard for 30 years plus rapturously received tributes to the band’s fated predecessor, Joy Division
Guardian *****

“A perfect collision of old and new orders… a brilliantly theatrical mix”
The i News

“Outstanding… A stunning and artful setup. A highly effective marriage of synth strings and atmospheric textures that gives the songs a twist and a fresh coat of sonic paint”
Louder Than War

“A musical masterstroke with visuals to match”
Manchester Evening News

Thurston Moore, May 2019 (Tabatha Fireman/Getty Images for Fender Musical Instruments Corporation)

Thurston Moore has shared a cover of a New Order song, which serves as the B-side for his forthcoming trio of singles.

The Sonic Youth co-founder, who released his new album ‘Spirit Counsel’ last September , is set to drop a trio of 7-inch singles that all feature the special New Order cover, ‘Leave Me Alone’, taken from the Manchester band’s 1983 album ‘Power, Corruption & Lies’. Recorded in Salford, which Moore says “is the only place I would dare cover a New Order song, with local musicians and local pints”. “It was just one of those rare occasions, where something I wouldn’t normally do was done just for fun, and in homage and respect to the place.”

The DAYDREAM LIBRARY SERIES are ecstatic to announce the release of Thurston’s forthcoming trio of 7-inch singles:

1.) SPRING SWELLS 2.) THREE GRACES 3.) POLLINATION.

Each 7-inch comprises an excerpted moment from the Thurston Moore Group live in 2019, free-mixed and free-created by Wobbly (aka Jon Leidecker). The B-side of each is a special cover of a New Order track (recorded in Salford).

Moore releases the three singles on November 8th through his own Daydream Library Series.

In June 2017, New Order returned to the stage at Manchester’s Old Granada Studios where Joy Division made their television debut on Tony Wilson’s So It Goes programme in 1978. For the celebrated show ∑(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So it goes .., New Order deconstructed, rethought and rebuilt a wealth of material from throughout their career: familiar and obscure, old and new. Featuring tracks such as Disorder, from Joy Divisions Unknown Pleasures and not played live for 30 years, up to 2015’s Plastic from New Order’s critically acclaimed Top 5 album Music Complete– this is the perfect document of those magical 5 nights. The album was recorded live on 13th July 2017 and includes the full show and encore plus 3 additional tracks recorded over the residency to give listeners a full representation of the breadth of material performed.

If you’re looking for a New Order live album chock full of their greatest hits, go pick up Live at the London Troxy or Live at Bestival 2012. If you’re looking for a New Order live album with a more unconventional setlist, a broader artistic vision and a 12-piece synthesizer orchestra, check out this new one, the arty-mathy, horrendously titled ?(No,12k,Lg,17Mif) New Order + Liam Gillick: So it goes.

Their MIF performance featured a bold stage setup and dramatic light show, which “reacted” to the music and was designed by English conceptual artist Liam Gillick. Its aesthetic devotion to sharp lines and spiraling motifs can be found throughout. Above all, this is an album full of intention. The way it toggles between the dreamy, the rave-y, the interstellar and the mathematical is what makes it uniquely transcendent. It’s so easy to get locked into the pulsing grooves and club beats on “this weird New Order live album” (which is likely how you’ll refer to it) that you won’t even realize songs like “Age of Consent” or “Blue Monday” are missing.

New Order Ltd. Under exclusive licence to Mute Artists Ltd. Released on: 2019-07-12

3LP – Limited Edition Triple album pressed on transparent coloured vinyl. Packaged in individual sleeves and into a hardback slipcase, all with spot gloss finish.24 page 12″ sized booklet with silk finish containing exclusive imagery and text relating to the legendary event. Includes hi definition digital download of all 18 tracks.

No photo description available.

Image result for graphic record player

it’s just over *One* week now till Record Store Day 2019 and the excitement is palpable. People are already eyeing up the sacred list, marking down their order of priorities, and what a bumper year it is this year too – with an unbeatable set of rarities, exclusives, fancy editions and downright collectables to feast your eyes and ears on.

Notable releases this week : music fans were rewarded with some of the most exciting new releases of the year so far. Natalie Mering, aka Weyes Blood, has released a career-defining LP, Titanic Rising, one of the highest-rated albums of 2019 so far. also received this week the highly-anticipated sophomore LP from D.C. rockers Priests, The Seduction of Kansas. In terms of track releases, we heard new singles from Vampire Weekend, The National and Big Thief plus some great cuts from Julie Shapiro, Field Medic and Porridge Radio.

The David Bowie ‘Spying Through The Keyhole’ 7″ box set looks great!
Circa Waves bring out a brand new record – limited blue vinyl.
There’s a new Weyes Blood album that has had excellent reviews – limited red vinyl.
the New Order ‘Movement’ box set looks nice – weighs a ton too.
A second set of Motorhead reissues.
Limited coloured vinyl from Music On Vinyl for Matthew Sweet and Within Temptation reissues.
Black vinyl for The Wannadies ‘Be A Girl’ .

W.H Lung’s dinked n limited “Incidental Music” should be first album of note to receive the attention combining it does, the thrust of Krautrock, the shimmer of psychedelia and all the gung-ho decadence of space rock.

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W H Lung – Incidental Music

W. H. Lung’s arrival at their debut album has been less conventional than most. A trait shared with the music they make, which weaves between shimmering synth pop and the infectious grooves of 70’s Berlin. The band never had any intention of playing live when forming, aiming instead to be a primarily studio-based project.

That approach was challenged when they released their debut 10” (‘Inspiration!/Nothing Is’) in 2017, which meant that they were quickly in demand. Booking requests started to flood in and W. H. Lung found themselves cutting their teeth on festival stages that summer. Though whilst some new bands may have let that interest change the course of the project, W. H. Lung stayed true to their original reticence and worked mainly as a studio band with their formidable live shows kept sporadic.

W. H. Lung have allowed this album to naturally gestate over the course of two years . The result is a remarkably considered debut – the production is crisp and pristine but not over-polished, the synths and electronics radiate and hum with a golden aura and the vocals weave between tender delivery and forceful eruptions. There is a palpable energy to the songs, as experienced in 10 glorious minutes of opening statement ‘Simpatico People’.
“I think it’s important to erase the distinction between ‘high’ and ‘low’ culture,” states Joseph E. This colliding of worlds not only exists in the potent mix between whip-smart arrangements, lyrics and seamlessly danceable music but also in the fact that they are named after a cash and carry in Manchester. As Tom P. explains, “I thought it was funny juxtaposing those kind of austere associations with W. H. Auden and other initialed poets, writers, artists, etc. with the fact that it’s really just a Chinese supermarket.”

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Rozi Plain – What a Boost

Rozi Plain has been making music since her brother taught her a few chords on the guitar aged 13. Raised in Winchester, she spent a few years studying art and painting boats in Bristol, where she began collaborating with long-term friends Kate Stables (This Is The Kit) and Rachael Dadd among many others on a thriving local scene. It was there that Rozi made her first two albums, 2008’s Inside Over Here and 2012’s Joined Sometimes Unjoined, each works of deliciously sad and beautiful pop full of heart-wrenching harmonies dotted with unexpected instrumental flourishes. Released in April 2015 on Lost Map and featuring contributions from Hot Chip’s Alexis Taylor among others her last album Friend was a deeply meaningful and wonderfully measured ode to memory, place, companionship and music’s remarkable power as an emotional salve. A companion album of remixes, unreleased tracks and radio sessions, Friend Of A Friend, was released in 2016.

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Luke Sital-Singh – A Golden State

Luke Sital-Singh releases his third album A Golden State on Raygun Records. The album was produced by Tommy McLaughlin (Villagers, Soak), who also produced Luke’s last album, 2017’s Time Is A Riddle, and recorded in Portland’s Jackpot Studios, famously set up by Elliott Smith, where alumni include R.E.M., Stephen Malkmus, and The Decemberists. A Golden State contains new single Los Angeles, plus the 2018 singles The Last Dayand Love Is Hard Enough Without The Winter.

At its most basic, A Golden State is album of California dreaming. The songs therein reflect a new chapter, and a new mindset for Luke. “Overall, there is this ethereal, positive vibe – without being too cheesy,” he says. “There is an Americana fantasy, of wanting to escape to this gorgeous place – but also about what I’m escaping from.” The cover artwork, created by Hannah, a four-colour lino cut of the Venice Beach canals, is taken from her upcoming art book, Coastline.

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Weyes Blood – Titanic Rising

The phantom zone, the parallax, the upside down—there is a rich cultural history of exploring in-between places. Through her latest, Titanic Rising, Weyes Blood, a.k.a. Natalie Mering, has designed her own universe to soulfully navigate life’s mysteries. Maneuvering through a space-time continuum, she plays the role of melodic, sometimes melancholic, anthropologist. Tellingly, Mering classifies Titanic Rising – which was written and recorded during the first half of 2018, after three albums and years of touring – as the Kinks meet WWII or Bob Seger meets Enya. The latter captures the album’s willful expansiveness (“You can tell there’s not a guy pulling the strings in Enya’s studio,” she notes, admiringly). The former relays her imperative to connect with listeners. “The clarity of Bob Seger is unmistakable. I’m a big fan of conversational songwriting,” she adds. “I just try to do that in a way that uses abstract imagery as well.” The Weyes Blood frontwoman grew up singing in gospel and madrigal choirs. (Listen closely to Titanic Rising, and you’ll also hear the jazz of Hoagy Carmichael mingle with the artful mysticism of Alejandro Jodorowsky and the monomyth of scholar Joseph Campbell.) “Something to Believe,” a confessional that makes judicious use of the slide guitar, touches on that cosmological upbringing. “Belief is something all humans need. Shared myths are part of our psychology and survival,” she says. “Now we have a weird mishmash of capitalism and movies and science. There have been moments where I felt very existential and lost.” As a kid, she filled that void with Titanic. (Yes, the movie.) “It was engineered for little girls and had its own mythology,” she explains. Mering also noticed that the blockbuster romance actually offered a story about loss born of man’s hubris. “It’s so symbolic that The Titanic would crash into an iceberg, and now that iceberg is melting, sinking civilization.” Today, this hubris also extends to the relentless adoption of technology, at the expense of both happiness and attention spans. But Weyes Blood isn’t one to stew. Her observations play out in an ethereal saunter: far more meditative than cynical. To Mering, listening and thinking are concurrent experiences. “There are complicated influences mixed in with more relatable nostalgic melodies,” she says. “In my mind my music feels so big, a true production. I’m not a huge, popular artist, but I feel like one when I’m in the studio. But it’s never taking away from the music. I’m just making a bigger space for myself.”

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Priests – The Seduction Of Kansas

What is at stake in the seduction of Kansas? Like a gavel or hammer, the question rattles across the second LP from Washington, D.C. rock iconoclasts Priests: Entering their eighth year as a band, Priests—drummer Daniele Daniele, vocalist Katie Alice Greer, and guitarist G.L. Jaguar—remain an inspired anomaly in modern music. A band on its own label—jolting the greater music world with early releases by Downtown Boys, Snail Mail, Sneaks, and Gauche—they are living proof that it is still possible to work on one’s own terms, to collectively cultivate one’s own world. Priests enlisted two primary collaborators in writing, arranging, and recording The Seduction of Kansas. After playing cello, mellotron, and lap steel on Nothing Feels Natural, multi-instrumentalist Janel Leppin (Mellow Diamond, Marissa Nadler) returned to breathe air into Priests’ demos, serving as primary bassist and a fourth songwriting collaborator on The Seduction of Kansas.

The band also found a kindred spirit in producer John Congleton (Angel Olsen, St. Vincent), recording for two weeks at his Elmwood Studio in Dallas. It marked the band’s first time opening up their creative work to collaborate with someone outside of their DC-based community—a decidedly less hermetic approach. Priests found a third collaborator in bassist Alexandra Tyson, who has also joined the touring band. The songwriting process found the group once again analyzing the textures and scopes of albums as aggressive as they are introspective, like Massive Attack’s Mezzanine, Portishead’s Third, and Nine Inch Nails’ Downward Spiral. The first single, “The Seduction of Kansas,” is Priests’ purest pop song to date. It is dark and glittering—though there is still something fantastically off about it, decadent and uneasy at once.

As journalist Thomas Frank explored in 2004’s What’s the Matter With Kansas?, the ideological sway of Kansas has often predicted the direction in which the U.S. will move—whether leaning socialist in the 1800s or going staunchly conservative in the 1980s. Illustrating Kansas’ potent place in our national imagination—as well as “a chorus of whoever is trying to persuade the social consciousness of Kansas”—Greer sings brilliantly of a “bloodthirsty cherub choir” in a cornfield, of “a drawn out charismatic parody of what a country through it used to be,” beckoning that “I’m the one who loves you.” The song does what Priests do best: They make us think, stir us with complexity.

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Son Volt – Union

Led by vocalist, guitarist, and songwriter Jay Farrar, Son Volt became one of the leading bands in the alternative country community, attracting critical praise and an audience that was loyal if not always large. Farrar has collaborated with Ben Gibbard (Death Cab for Cutie), Steven Drozd (The Flaming Lips), Jeff Tweedy (Wilco) and several other well respected artists / musicians. Union is the bands 10th studio album and mixes present and past into strong confluence. The thirteen new songs written by Farrar confront our turbulent politics and articulate the clarity and comfort music can offer in the tumult.

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Lady Lamb – Even In The Tremor

Even in the Tremor marks Spaltro’s latest full-length LP following 2015’s After and it’s a remarkable achievement because, among other things, it’s the first time in her career that Spaltro is singing explicitly about herself. Between confessing a tantrum in a batting cage (Little Flaws), telling the story of her parent’s kiddie-pool baptism (Young Disciple) and singing openly about untangling her girlfriend’s wet hair (Deep Love), Even in the Tremor is deeply rooted in the people and places, extraordinary and mundane, that have shaped Spaltro into the self-determining artist she is today. Known for her keen observations of others, Spaltro now turns her multifaceted ruminations inward; She calls out from dreams, peers into churches, has fits of rage, and struggles to get out of her head long enough to love herself and those around her. Commitment to creating only what is necessary and urgently felt is the key to appreciating Spaltro’s fearless songwriting, as emotional as it is philosophical. Even in the Tremor signifies the arrival of her most sonically soaring and brutally honest album to date.

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Shana Cleveland – Night Of The Worm Moon

Shana Cleveland has been beguiling listeners for years in her role as the superlative front woman for elastic surf rockers La Luz. Now Cleveland is evolving her sound on the new solo full-length Night of the Worm Moon, a serene album that flows like a warm current while simultaneously wresting open a portal to another dimension. As much a work of California sci-fi as Octavia Butler’s Parable novels, Night of the Worm Moon incorporates everything from alternate realities to divine celestial bodies. Inspired in part by one of her musical idols, the Afro-futurist visionary Sun Ra (the album’s title is a tip of the hat to his 1970 release Night of the Purple Moon), the record blends pastoral folk with cosmic concerns. Cleveland dreamt up this premise while living in Los Angeles, a city where – as deftly explored on La Luz’s recent Floating Features – reality and fantasy casually co-exist.

Abetting Cleveland during the recording process was a familiar gallery of co-conspirators: multi-instrumentalist Will Sprott of Shannon and the Clams, original La Luz bassist Abbey Blackwell, Goss, pedal steel player Olie Eshelman, and Kristian Garrard, who drummed on Cleveland’s previous solo effort (with then-backing band The Sandcastles), 2011’sOh Man, Cover the Ground. But whereas that album was internal and contemplative, Night of the Worm Moon occupies a different, vibrant kind of headspace. UFO sightings, insect carcasses, and twilight dimensions are all grist for Cleveland’s restless creativity, and they and other inspirations collide beautifully on the album’s 10 kaleidoscopic tracks–a spacebound transmission from America’s weirdo frontier.

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Gurr – She Says

Gurr return with a new 7 track EP “She Says” released in April 2019. Recorded with New York producer Mathew Molner (Sunflower Bean, Friends) and Berlin based producer Tobi Kuhn at the UFO studios in Berlin.

“We met Sunflower Bean at Latitude Festival in UK and asked them who produced their album “Human Ceremony” as we liked how it sounded retro and modern, they connected us with Mathew and we brought him to Berlin to record with us” says Andreya Casablanca... “After ‘In My Head’ was recorded all in analogue we definitely wanted to have a little bit more room for the production in these songs. We were adding guitars, small synth lines and sounds after laying down the basic tracks.”

The writing of the EP was heavily influenced by the big transitions in the lives of Laura Lee and Andreya Casablanca in the 12 month period after the release of ‘In My Head’, which can be heard in the fake highs of optimism of tracks such as “Of Hollywood” and “Bye Bye”, the melancholia of “She Says” and “Hush” and the angst of Middleton Mall but musically the band draws inspiration across genres, from contemporary dream pop wonders Beach Fossils to psychedelic classics such as The Velvet Underground.

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David Bowie – Spying Through a Keyhole

With 2019 marking 50 years since David Bowie’s first hit, Space Oddity, Parlophone release a 7″ vinyl singles box set of nine previously unreleased recordings from the era during which Space Oddity was first conceived.

The title Spying Through A Keyhole is a lyric taken from the previously unknown song, Love All Around, and though most of the other titles are known, these versions have never been officially released until late last year. Most of the recordings are solo vocal and acoustic home demo performances, unless otherwise stated.

The design of each single label is presented to reflect the way David sent many of his demos to publishers and record companies, featuring his own handwritten song titles on EMIDISC acetate labels. The singles themselves are all mono and play at 45 r.p.m.

Due to the nature of some of the solo home demos where Bowie accompanied himself on acoustic guitar, the recording quality isn’t always of a usual studio fidelity. This is partly due to David’s enthusiastic strumming hitting the red on a couple of the tracks, along with the limitations of the original recording equipment and tape degradation. However, the historical importance of these songs and the fact that the selections are from an archive of tracks cleared for release by Bowie, overrides this shortcoming.

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The Proper Ornaments – 6 Lenins

‘Six Lenins’, the third album release from The Proper Ornaments, sees the band master their seemingly effortless but finely-wrought sound as their songwriting prowess refuses to plateau. Fresh from an US tour in Autumn last year, the London jangle pop group led by James Hoare (also of Ultimate Painting/Veronica Falls) and Max Claps (Toy) went into James‘ home studio in Finsbury Park, London and made their finest recordings to date on a newly-installed 16 track Studer machine – joined by Danny Nellis (Charles Howl) on bass and Bobby Syme (Wesley Gonzalez) on drums. Having escaped deep, twisting tunnels of illness, divorce and drug abuse to release their second record in January 2017, it’s unsurprising they sound sunnier this time around. What their supremely melodic work suggests is a nonchalance or naivety but is in fact an expensively bought slice of coherence and clarity within a constantly shifting backdrop to their lives and landscapes. The band exists as an unassuming and resilient organism in a fiercely competitive, trashed environmental niche. Throughout their years of hard-edged music industry Darwinism, they’ve shown longevity and growth scuttling from the wreckage of their previous guitar bands to become one united organism. “We started writing new songs in the Summer. I was in bed recovering from hepatitis and very broken and tired so couldn’t do anything else apart from playing guitar,” says Max, “and the songs slowly started to appear. In August we realised we had five new songs each and free time, so we decided to record them. The actual recording only took two weeks and it was considerably easier than our previous recordings.” The speed with which “Six Lenins” was made suggests the two songwriters managed to keep a keen focus on what they wanted to achive, further finessing the balance of conflict and collaboration that lends their sweet, succinct tunes their nervous energy. Well-crafted songwriting and a controlled sonic despite a zealous analogue sensibility. The opener ‘Apologies’, sets out stridently and the mood and momentum, even as we weave through some more sombre moments, never dips before soaring with the Velvets-y propeller riff of live favourite ‘In the Garden’ to end the record.

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Circa Waves – What’s It Like Over There?

The new studio album from Circa Waves, titled What’s It Like Over There? via Prolifica Inc. / [PIAS]. Recorded in just one month, and renewing their blossoming co-producing relationship with Alan Moulder (Foals, The Killers), What’s It Like Over There? is an album that’s creatively unshackled and refuses to stay still. It fuses the visceral thrill of rock music with a slick pop sound, its themes of modern ennui, emotional fragility and all the inside-outs and upside-downs of relationships making it a record that could only have been made now. Whilst the anthemic Movies will appeal to the band’s long-standing fan base, the likes of Sorry I’m Yours and Be Somebody Good see Circa Waves experiment with a new progressive sound that will surprise and delight in equal measure. Me Myself and Hollywood touches on the band’s love of R&B, whilst Times Won’t Change Me is a piano-led, Beatles-inspired future hit. What’s It Like Over There? always manages to sidestep genres and easy pigeonholing, but what remains constant is Circa Waves’ ability to create the kind of infectious music that is propelling them towards the top tier of British music.

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The Drums – Brutalism

Brutalism is quite possibly the best collection of songs in The Drums’ ten-year career. The album is defined by growth, transformation and questions, but it doesn’t provide all the answers. Brutalism is a form of simplistic architecture defined by blocks of raw concrete. Brutalism is rooted in an emotional rawness but its layers are soft, intricate and warm, full of frivolous and exquisitely crafted pop songs that blast sunlight and high energy in the face of anxiety, solitude and crippling self-doubt.

Even the fact that Brutalism sounds intentional, focused and efficient is a symbol of how Pierce’s prioritizing of his own health and wellbeing has bled into how he makes music. For the making of this album, between his lake house in Upstate New York and a studio in Stinson Beach, California, Pierce was more open than ever, keeping his control freakery at bay, working with others to produce and record the album. He brought in Chris Coady (Beach House, Future Islands, Amen Dunes) to mix it. If there was a guitar part he wanted to write but couldn’t play, he brought in a guitarist. It’s also the first Drums record with a live drummer. Delegating freed up Pierce’s time to produce a more specific vision.

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Molly Tuttle – When You’re Ready

Award-winning guitarvirtuoso Molly Tuttle, whose debut album, ‘When You’re Ready’ is an insightful, gifted album from a songwriter who was crowned “Instrumentalist of the Year” at the 2018 Americana Music Awards on the strength of her EP Rise, Tuttle has broken boundaries and garnered the respect of her peers, winning fans for her incredible at picking guitar technique and confessional songwriting.

Graced with a clear, true voice and a keen melodic sense, the 25-year-old seems poised for a long and exciting career. ‘When You’re Ready’, produced by Ryan Hewitt (The Avett Brothers, The Lumineers) showcases her astonishing range and versatility and shows that she is more than simply an Americana artist.

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Matthew Sweet – Girlfriend

Matthew Sweet is an American singer-songwriter and rock musician. He was part of the burgeoning music scene in Georgia during the ‘80s, before gaining commercial success in the ‘90s. In 1991 Matthew Sweet released Girlfriend, the pop-rock album which was widely considered an artistic breakthrough. It quickly garnered impressive sales, spawning a top 10 single with the title track. Girlfriend is Sweet’s most commercially and critically successful album to date. Both the title track and Divine Intervention did well on the charts. The album was included as number 61 on Paste’s list of “The 90 Best albums of the 1990s”.

LP – Limited edition of 1.000 individually numbered copies on 180 Gram pink vinyl with Insert.

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New Order – Movement – Definitive Edition

Out of the ashes of Joy Division, the remaining members decided to carry on recording under the name of New Order. The band’s debut album Movement recorded between 24th April to the 4th May 1981 at Strawberry in Stockport and featuring all new material, produced by Martin Hannett was released in 11th November 1981 on Factory Records. TheMovementboxed set includes the vinyl LP with its original iconic sleeve designed by Peter Saville, original album CD in replica mini album sleeve, a bonus CD of previously unreleased tracks, DVD of live shows and TV appearances plus hard backed book all housed in a lift off lid box. The vinyl LP of the original album is cut on 180 Gram and features the 2015 remastered audio, presented in a replica of the original sleeve. The second CD includes 18 completely unreleased tracks made from Demos, Sessions, Rehearsal Recordings and an Alternative 7” version of Temptation Accompanying the set is a 48 Page hard back book which features photos and an essay.

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Karen Dalton – The Karen Dalton Archives Box

Packaged in Ampex studio tape style carboard box. Including for the first-time ever on Vinyl – 3 LP : the 1962 double live album Cotton Eyed Joe remastered…. and the 1963 home recordings album Green Rocky Road remastered. 4 CD – same albums and 1CD of unreleased home recordings including a mesmerizing take on God Bless The Child – 52 Page Book with scans of Karen Dalton Personal archives (writings, photographs, memos) disclosed here for the first time. It also comes with a Large T-shirts and a Download Card.

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Fake Laugh -Honesty / Surrounded

Hot on the heels of his debut LP and follow up 7”, Fake Laugh AKA Kamran Khan delivers yet two more bangers for the kids, in the form of another double A-Side. The driving, dream-pop bop that is Honesty features guest vocals from Poppy Hankin of previous tour-mates Girl Ray, whilst the skittish, social commentary of Surrounded hurtles along set against a backdrop of razor-sharp melodies and instant-hit hooks.

Having successfully toured the albums from Hooky’s previous bands for over eight years now, Peter Hook & the Light  have now reached the late eighties and early nineties albums of new order, “Technique” and “Republic” in their consecutive run and have announced a raft of new concert dates.

As has become their custom, all dates feature the Light performing an opening set of Joy Division material. 

‘Technique’, New Order’s fifth studio album chronicles the impact of acid house on the band, marking the clearest statement of the rock and dance influences which were shaping their output. released in january 1989, just after the bands infamous G-mex gig and aftershow downstairs at the Hacienda in december the previous year, it became New Order’s first album to go to number one in the UK. it was also hugely successful in the united states where the influence of Quincy Jones’ Qwest label regularly got the band’s singles to the top of the american dance charts, ‘Technique’ was driven by the classic acid house single “fine time” which rivals “Blue Monday” as probably the most openly dance orientated record the group ever produced whilst other tracks on the lp “Round and Round”, “Mr disco” and “Vanishing Point” also reflect the dance sensibilities then fusing their way into New Order’s sound. yet like on its predecessor, “Brotherhood”, these are balanced by the vocal led, more rock leaning “All the Way”, “Gulity Partner” and “Run”.

legendarily recorded in ibiza in 1988, ‘Technique’ has often been observed to capture the sound of that summer and the heady period back them both on the island and in the uk and of course, Manchester. as is widely known, the band didn’t actually do much work in ibiza, a jaunt that Factory label boss Tony Wilson once told Peter Hook “was the most expensive f*cking holiday you’ve ever been on”. the band returned to the UK to finish the lp at Bath’s Real World studios later in 1988, itself the scene of another legendary New Order party when recording was completed.

In many ways, ‘Technique’ epitomised its time and the culture surrounding it. it came out to generally ecstatic reviews from the top notch echelons of the music press. in the uk, melody maker called it “a rare and ravishing triumph” whilst nme proclaimed the band “had fashioned an lp of rare and unflinching honesty”. across in the states, spin called it New Order’s best ever album, rolling stone referred to its “sonic presence with immaculate playing” and pitchfork sum up the album simply as “magnificent.”

“placed in the perfect position to deliver the definitive alternative take on house music, the band produced another classic record” – all music

Many consider ‘Technique’ to mark the high point of New Order and as they went on from the album to headline Reading festival in august 1989, before going on hiatus and also pursuing their solo projects, this is generally thought of as the golden period for the band.

due to the well documented history surrounding ‘Republic’, it is remarkably difficult to characterise it as sharing the same sunny outlook as ‘Technique’ but Hooky’s decision to include it in these concerts underline his commitment to perform all of his catalogue that he has committed to record. Not that ‘Republic’ wasn’t hugely successful. again it went to number one in the UK and became the band’s biggest ever selling album in america, narrowly missing the billboard album chart top ten peaking at number 11.

however it is not unknown that it was new order’s most difficult album to make. Factory records had hit financial trouble and needed a new order album to bail themselves out so the band were coerced into recording the album in to save Factory. something that didn’t entirely work out as Factory was then to go bankrupt in november 1992 and New Order then signed to London Records, an offshoot of warner bros with ‘republic’ released in may 1993.

The band roared back with first single “Regret”, still thought of as one of their finest ever, and subsequent singles “Ruined in a Day” and “World” did well, both in their original versions and as remixes which again dominated the dance charts.

It’s not hard to deduce that the demise of Factory, coupled with the ongoing difficulties surrounding the band’s involvement in Manchester’s Hacienda as well as internal friction within New Order and due to the band members’ solo projects, all had an impact on the recording sessions and mood that lies behind “republic, something that Stephen Hague did his utmost to assuage in producing the lp.

Still considered a worthwhile addition by fans to New Order’s catalogue, yet, if not perhaps hitting the standards they had previously set for themselves, ‘Republic’ did receive some strong reviews. nme’s dele fadele awarded it 8/10 on release whilst all music commented that “‘Republic’ simply borrows elements of contemporary innovations in club music to frame a set of effortlessly enjoyable alternative pop songs.”