Posts Tagged ‘John Parish’

Jesca hoop 01

From the new album “Stonechild” Red White and Black is a one of a kind within the songs off Stonechild. It’s a bitter pill… an anecdotal antidote. We get to hear Lucius sing with me the chorus ! The video which was directed by my old friend and collaborator Elia Petridis and his company Filmatics was a true adventure to make…from conception to execution. I’m game.

Jesca says of the song “Red White and Black” is a poem, like a snapshot, set in post civil war USA when slavery was “abolished” and swiftly rebranded by the prison system. It’s a personal acknowledgement and willingness to join the conversation for change”.

A culmination of life and musical experience, uncompromising in its vision, Stonechild, the new studio album from Jesca Hoop is a self described “compassion project.”

Released on July 5th by Memphis Industries, Stonechild is Hoop refined and defined. Beautiful, subtle and stark, her fifth album, the follow up to 2017’s highly acclaimed ‘Memories Are Now’, is her best yet.

Despite being a long term resident of Manchester, Hoop, has until now, returned to her native California to record. This time round however, “it was” according to Hoop“time to step out of my comfort zone, my safe place”, venturing south to Bristol to team up with producer John Parish (PJ Harvey, Aldous Harding, This is the Kit). Parish’s minimal and purist approach helped clarify Hoop in her ideas and subtly yet effectively realigning her sound. The simplified arrangements draw focus to the fundamental sophistication of the songs.

While Hoop’s trademark finger-plucked guitar and ethereal textures remain, the songs and their presentation are ever more direct.Parish“was a gentle collaborator until he killed one of my darlings” Hoop jests. “I’ve never been so brutally edited, and I wasn’t shy about expressing my discomfort at the sight of my work on the cutting room floor. He said, you will forgive me, and in some way I think I actually enjoyed that treatment…being stripped back to the bare basics…albeit painfully”. Stonechild ventures further into fresh territory with other voices joining the narrative, with Kate Stables (aka This is the Kit) Rozi Plain and Lucius singing the choruses and expanding the sensual depth of the sonic bloom.

Embedded in Hoop’s song writing is an inherent unpredictability something she ascribes to being “guided more from instinct than study”. Perhaps more than ever before, Stonechild sees Hoop lead us through uncharted landscapes across the course of the album. “When I look at the history of my life, I realise I have the breakdown of not only my parents’ marriage but also the breakdown of their parenting to thank for the wild and unexpected course that my life would take. I went looking for a raw and rugged world. the opposite of what I was raised in.”

The album title was settled after a trip to a Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum, where the Stonechild is a sad, compelling display of an unborn foetus carried by a woman for over 30 years. “They become a hard ball of bones, a rock. Phonetically, it’s a beautiful sounding word – hard and soft – but also, I am taken by the idea of carrying something for a long time, perhaps in secret and then giving it up. I hope I have made an album of substance. There is meat on the bone”.

There certainly is; the breath-taking Shoulder Charge, with Lucius contributing backing vocals, speaks of stigmatized culture and the kind of isolation that is formed by shame in a world where were “we are actually and truly the same …even in our differences. To understand all is to forgive all”.

Old Fear of Father tackles an exhausted patriarchy and misogyny but if it was perpetuated by females. “I love my boys, more than I love my girl, try not to show it, she’s knows, like I knew”. It’s bare yet dense arrangement reveals a story that is both heart-breaking and shamefully true.

On Red White and Black, Hoop chants down white supremacy. “Now the iron cloth that’s cut from the loom bares the black and white stripe of a cotton field rolling- And the dark mines and flame of redeemers put them right back in the iron cloth and the flag is waving”. As Hoop says “current politics is fucking disturbing. I write from personal perspective, about relationships mostly and I don’t find much music in politics, but as hate crimes increase, women’s rights are being rolled back, and the two nations I call home are building walls… well, the political has become deeply personal.”

The folkiest moment on the album, the Kate Stables featuring Outside of Eden,concerns those young ones whose development is now guided by technology and the increasingly intimate relationship between child and device. Come shut in boys for the girlfriend experience, enter the code and I’ll taste real”.

Stonechild, Hoop says, is intended to “wrap its arms around our human planet spinning in its increasingly precarious wobble”. These rich and curious songs derived from themes of our troubled times speak Hoop’s heart and mind from her empathetic yet tough loving centre point. With writing so fluid, so natural the result is an album where everything is truly meant.

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'Designer'

The first single ‘The Barrel’ has been launched today, with a delightfully off-kilter accompanying video that transmutes to film the intense and commanding energy seen in Harding’s live shows. Designer finds the New Zealander hitting her creative stride.  After Party, Harding came off a 100-date tour last summer and went straight into the studio with a collection of songs written on the road.  Reuniting with John Parish, producer of Party, Harding spent 15 days recording and 10 days mixing at Rockfield Studios, Monmouth and Bristol’s J&J Studio and Playpen.  From the bold strokes of opening track ‘Fixture Picture’, there is an overriding sense of an enigmatic artist confident in their work, with contributions from Huw Evans (H. Hawkline), Stephen Black (Sweet Baboo), drummer Gwion Llewelyn and violinist Clare Mactaggart broadening and complimenting Harding’s rich and timeless songwriting.

‘The Barrel’, by Aldous Harding. New album ‘Designer’ will be released on 4AD/Flying Nun on 26th April 2019.

This Is The Kit is the musical project of Kate Stables and whoever joins her. You thought you didn’t like the banjo but you were wrong pal. Listen as Kate rips forward with her hypnotic twang pattern and a voice of rare, unaffected beauty. This is the Kit is honest music. It’s how it really is! Honest and eager, that’s what makes it so beautiful.

This Is The Kit’s first studio album release was recorded in Italy and produced by John Parish. It was first released on Microbe records (France) in 2006
Originally released April 18th, 2015

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Recorded by Marco Tagliola and produced by John Parish in Italy 2006. Featuring Kate Stables – vocals, guitar and banjo; John Parish – drums; Julien Barbagalo – drums; Jamie Whitby Coles – drums; Jesse Morningstar – violin, guitar, vocals, percussion.

John Parish is best known for his work with acclaimed British artist PJ Harvey, which dates back to when she was backing singer and guitarist in his cult band Automatic Dlamini. He is also an accomplished composer, solo artist, & producer. Parish co-wrote and performed on Eels’ 2001 album Souljacker, and has worked with many different artists , Sparklehorse, 16 Horsepower, Tracy Chapman, Adrian Utley and Howe Gelb/Giant Sand   

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PJ Harvey guests on “I’m Sorry for Your Loss,” a new song by her frequent collaborator and producer John Parish. The song pays tribute to Sparklehorse frontman Mark Linkous, who died by suicide in 2010. Parish produced Sparklehorse’s 2001 album A Wonderful Life.

Harvey and Parish sing morose lyrics like “The sun never felt colder/The window rattled and I wondered if you’d just passed over” amid strummed acoustic instruments and a sorrowful melody. The three-and-a-half–minute track will appear on Parish’s upcoming album Bird Dog Dante, which is due out June 15th.

releases June 15th, 2018

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Devotion is a stunning artistic about-face from revered Melbourne songwriter Laura Jean. Loved for her piercing, intimate, folk-based albums such as 2014’s Laura Jean and 2011’s A fool who’ll, Laura has worked with producer John Lee (Beaches, Lost Animal) to create an enveloping, deep pop album like nothing she has done before.
Laura’s last self-titled album, recorded in the UK with John Parish (Perfume Genius, Aldous Harding, PJ Harvey) and featuring Jenny Hval on backing vocals, was a critical smash in Australia, shortlisted for the Australian Music Prize and nominated for two Age Music Victoria Awards.
The album lead to Australian and New Zealand tours with Aldous Harding and Marlon Williams, plus shows with Julianna Barwick, Jessica Pratt and more.
But soon Laura found herself tinkering with a 90s Kawai keyboard, enjoying its built-in drum rhythms and moody synth sounds. Laura began a series of shows performing with nothing but the keyboard, as the idea for her next album grew and developed.
Devotion is an album about teenage obsession, coastal child- hood and vivid memory – universal themes filtered through Laura’s razor sharp lyrical focus. Initial influences for the record took in R’n’B, 80s adult contemporary pop and 70s disco, but the end result is transformed into something wholly other, full of depth, resonance and mystery.
Played entirely by Laura, John Lee and drummer Dave Williams (Augie March), “Devotion” is both contemporary and timeless. 

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About the album, Laura says: “Devotion is about how a lonely coastal childhood filters into a contemporary adult life built hundreds of miles away. I wrote this album for my mum, middle sister and myself as we were at that time – eccentric, romantically-unfulfilled teens and a stressed out single mum trying to have a love life. In those times we needed to hear songs that were loving and uplifting, about the reality of intimacy, longing, romantic risk and reward. The album is narrated by me in the present, a detached adult figure far away from home, but still driven by an inner fantasy world that is set on the beach where I grew up.”

Nadine Khouri is a British-Lebanese musician and songwriter currently based in London, whose output has been described as “music born of perennial outsider status”. Mojo magazine recently featured Khouri as a Rising Artist To Watch and in recent months, Nadine’s also performed in renowned London venues like The Union Chapel and Cecil Sharp House.

Nadine was “discovered” by John Parish (producer associated with PJ Harvey and Giant Sand), and approached to sing on a track on his own Screenplay LP, following which she was invited to record a full-length album. Hence The Salted Air, which was recorded live by Parish and Ali Chant in a basement studio in Bristol, with a band comprising Huw Bennett, Jean-Marc Butty, J. Allen and Ruban Byrne, and featuring guest contributions from Adrian Crowley, Emma Smith and Florian Tanant and Parish himself.