Posts Tagged ‘Memphis Industires’

Jesca hoop 01

From the new album “Stonechild” Red White and Black is a one of a kind within the songs off Stonechild. It’s a bitter pill… an anecdotal antidote. We get to hear Lucius sing with me the chorus ! The video which was directed by my old friend and collaborator Elia Petridis and his company Filmatics was a true adventure to make…from conception to execution. I’m game.

Jesca says of the song “Red White and Black” is a poem, like a snapshot, set in post civil war USA when slavery was “abolished” and swiftly rebranded by the prison system. It’s a personal acknowledgement and willingness to join the conversation for change”.

A culmination of life and musical experience, uncompromising in its vision, Stonechild, the new studio album from Jesca Hoop is a self described “compassion project.”

Released on July 5th by Memphis Industries, Stonechild is Hoop refined and defined. Beautiful, subtle and stark, her fifth album, the follow up to 2017’s highly acclaimed ‘Memories Are Now’, is her best yet.

Despite being a long term resident of Manchester, Hoop, has until now, returned to her native California to record. This time round however, “it was” according to Hoop“time to step out of my comfort zone, my safe place”, venturing south to Bristol to team up with producer John Parish (PJ Harvey, Aldous Harding, This is the Kit). Parish’s minimal and purist approach helped clarify Hoop in her ideas and subtly yet effectively realigning her sound. The simplified arrangements draw focus to the fundamental sophistication of the songs.

While Hoop’s trademark finger-plucked guitar and ethereal textures remain, the songs and their presentation are ever more direct.Parish“was a gentle collaborator until he killed one of my darlings” Hoop jests. “I’ve never been so brutally edited, and I wasn’t shy about expressing my discomfort at the sight of my work on the cutting room floor. He said, you will forgive me, and in some way I think I actually enjoyed that treatment…being stripped back to the bare basics…albeit painfully”. Stonechild ventures further into fresh territory with other voices joining the narrative, with Kate Stables (aka This is the Kit) Rozi Plain and Lucius singing the choruses and expanding the sensual depth of the sonic bloom.

Embedded in Hoop’s song writing is an inherent unpredictability something she ascribes to being “guided more from instinct than study”. Perhaps more than ever before, Stonechild sees Hoop lead us through uncharted landscapes across the course of the album. “When I look at the history of my life, I realise I have the breakdown of not only my parents’ marriage but also the breakdown of their parenting to thank for the wild and unexpected course that my life would take. I went looking for a raw and rugged world. the opposite of what I was raised in.”

The album title was settled after a trip to a Philadelphia’s Mütter Museum, where the Stonechild is a sad, compelling display of an unborn foetus carried by a woman for over 30 years. “They become a hard ball of bones, a rock. Phonetically, it’s a beautiful sounding word – hard and soft – but also, I am taken by the idea of carrying something for a long time, perhaps in secret and then giving it up. I hope I have made an album of substance. There is meat on the bone”.

There certainly is; the breath-taking Shoulder Charge, with Lucius contributing backing vocals, speaks of stigmatized culture and the kind of isolation that is formed by shame in a world where were “we are actually and truly the same …even in our differences. To understand all is to forgive all”.

Old Fear of Father tackles an exhausted patriarchy and misogyny but if it was perpetuated by females. “I love my boys, more than I love my girl, try not to show it, she’s knows, like I knew”. It’s bare yet dense arrangement reveals a story that is both heart-breaking and shamefully true.

On Red White and Black, Hoop chants down white supremacy. “Now the iron cloth that’s cut from the loom bares the black and white stripe of a cotton field rolling- And the dark mines and flame of redeemers put them right back in the iron cloth and the flag is waving”. As Hoop says “current politics is fucking disturbing. I write from personal perspective, about relationships mostly and I don’t find much music in politics, but as hate crimes increase, women’s rights are being rolled back, and the two nations I call home are building walls… well, the political has become deeply personal.”

The folkiest moment on the album, the Kate Stables featuring Outside of Eden,concerns those young ones whose development is now guided by technology and the increasingly intimate relationship between child and device. Come shut in boys for the girlfriend experience, enter the code and I’ll taste real”.

Stonechild, Hoop says, is intended to “wrap its arms around our human planet spinning in its increasingly precarious wobble”. These rich and curious songs derived from themes of our troubled times speak Hoop’s heart and mind from her empathetic yet tough loving centre point. With writing so fluid, so natural the result is an album where everything is truly meant.

Menace Beach with a new single Song: Tastes Like Medicine on Memphis Industries the Leeds-based fuzz rockers are everywhere at the moment and recently played to a packed Rough Trade Record store in Nottingham . That’s why we were positively ecstatic to wake this morning to discover the band have unveiled the video for their single ‘Tastes Like Medicine’. The premiere follows the release of the Menace Beach’s debut album “Ratworld”, which came out on Memphis Industries last week.

The track is a charming piece of noise-pop that despite all its buzzing distortion, is still anchored on an infectious melody and duet vocal from Ryan Needham and Liza Violet.

The video was directed by the band’s good pal and fellow Leeds rocker Tom Hudson, more commonly of Pulled Apart By Horses. Hudson took an unenviable amount of homemade footage of Menace Beach while they were on tour with his band last year and played around with some child-like animation upon his arrival home.

He describes the process like this: “I’ve already done a couple of music videos for them before, ‘Drop Outs’ – an eyeball popping/face melting animation – and a lo-fi VHS video for the following single ‘Tennis Court’. When they asked me to produce a video for their new single ‘Tastes Like Medicine’ I thought I would try and combine the two together.”

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Another track from this gorgeous dream pop group Amelia Rivas, and Christian Pinchbeck huge wonderful synths and cinematic swooping Melodies, hauntingly fragile songs with a deep sense of mystery, vocals recording on Memphis industires