Posts Tagged ‘New Zealand’

Miss June was formed in Auckland by Annabel Liddell (Guitar, Vox), when Tom Leggett (Drums, Backing Vox), Chris Marshall (Bass, loud noises) and Jun Park (Guitar, the image of the band) met up for a jam to help Annabel out for her solo show at Bloodfest. Originally Annabel asked only Tom and Chris to join. However, during the jam they felt they lacked beauty and a graceful front figure. Disappointed, they almost cancelled the show until Jun walked into the room; they then begged him to join due to his handsome looks.

Miss June have a sound similiar to Bikini Kill and the Pixies who had an illegal love child. Or Anger with a kiss of sadness.

‘I Don’t Wanna Be Your Dog’ by Miss June

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Asta Rangu’s excellent debut EP, “Plasticine”It’s the work of label co-founder Ley-Hamilton, and is a fluid rock ‘n’ roll record full of tightly wound guitars and soaring vocal melodies. In the post-grunge era of the late ’90s it would have slotted in nicely beside some of the greats, but in a contemporary setting it still sounds fresh.

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The Clean is one of our favorite bands ever, and one of the most influential guitar bands of all time. The band–brothers David and Hamish Kilgour (Hamish is also in the band Mad Scene) along with Robert Scott (also of the Bats and the Magick Heads)–has been around for more than 20 years and made consistently, uniquely amazing records the entire time. Getaway is a typically mind-blowing array of sunny, chiming guitar pop, moody psychedelia, and melodic garage simplicity.

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You want something loud, raw and frantic with a crescendo of decibels and urgency? Then look no further than The Cavemen’s new full-length ‘Frantic Earth’.

It’s not surprising perhaps that these New Zealanders have found favour beyond their Auckland home. After we featured their debut album recently, we were ready for more. Out today (April 6th) through Slovenly Recordings, the 13 tracks are a rampaging onslaught of bit-size nuggets of ballsy punk.
And this third album release is, aptly, as they themselves describe it: “pure, primitive motherfuckin’ Garage Punk like you lust after every night when you’re licking your sexiest leather record jackets, or ‘77 punk steeped in a moldy stack of bootleg Motörhead outtake LPs. The Cavemen have gone batshit crazy, and they’re in full-on attack mode here with 13 tracks of panty dropping chaos guaranteed to land you in jail faster than you can crack one off in a grindhouse showing an “Ilsa” film. Rock’n’roll is here to stay, and it’ll always be for the crazy kids… like it or lump it!”

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New Zealand’s The Cavemen are back, ready to drink, fight, fxck and play some goddamn rock and roll! Nuke Earth is their 3rd foot long record and it’s pure, primitive motherfuckin’ Garage Punk like you lust after every night when you’re licking your sexiest leather record jackets, or ‘77 punk steeped in a moldy stack of bootleg Motörhead outtake LPs. The Cavemen have gone batshit crazy, and they’re in full-on attack mode here with 13 tracks of panty dropping chaos guaranteed to land you in jail faster than you can crack one off in a grindhouse showing an “Ilsa” film.Rock’n’roll is here to stay, and it’ll always be for the crazy kids…like it or lump it!T

Nadia Reid performing at Bush Hall, London

Nadia Reid, who released one my favourite albums of 2017 with Preservation and who we named one of the best new artists of 2017, Nadia has debuted a new song, “The Other Side of the Wheel,” in a live session for New Zealand’s RNZ Music. It was filmed on a park bench in Nadia’s hometown of Port Chalmers, and it includes gorgeous nature footage and you can hear the native birds chirping in the background. The song is just Nadia with an acoustic guitar, but it immediately registers as music just as strong as the more fleshed-out material on Preservation.

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On their first LP, 2015’s brilliant Metalmania, New Zealand’s Salad Boys built hooky, radiant songs from silvery strands of guitar, recalling the same effortless gift for melody as fellow countrymen The Bats as well as Reckoning-era R.E.M. Every song on the album felt wide-eyed and optimistic, frontman Joe Sampson’s voice front and center in the mix, the guitars ringing brightly behind him. The mood is decidedly grimmer on “This is Glue” which, like its predecessor, was recorded and mixed in Sampson’s home studio. Those claustrophobic environs suit Glue’s paranoid mood. Opener “Blown Up” rides a tense, krautrock rhythm, and Sampson’s voice is hushed and distant. When the guitars finally enter, one minute into the song, they arrive in great, furious slashes, a far cry from Metalmania’s church-bell pealing.

The result is a record that is marvelously tense and coiled; “Psych Slasher” is aptly named, a big, roaring garage rock song that wouldn’t be out of place in the Goner catalogue. “Choking Sick” heaves and stutters, Sampson repeating the same two-note vocal melody over and over as the drums kick and clatter behind him. “Under the Bed” is draped in funereal synths; “Scenic Route to Nowhere” is a three-minute festival of scuzz and rattle. “Hatred,” with its open arpeggios, is the closest in tone to Metalmania, but Sampson sighs out his vocals, undercutting the spiraling guitars with a twinge of melancholy. The album’s title is appropriate—every song feels caked in gluey layers of distortion, but instead of capsizing the record, the bleariness instead makes the record feel drifting and dreamlike. If Metalmania was a crisp, hi-res photo of a mountain range on a sunny day, Glue is that same photo during a rainstorm, with the focus off.

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Just over a year after releasing their lauded debut LP, Yoncalla, Yumi Zouma return with Willowbank, the band’s sophomore album.

For the making of Willowbank, Yumi Zouma’s members — Charlie Ryder, Josh Burgess, Christie Simpson and Sam Perry settled on a plan to reunite for the New Zealand summer. To complete what would become their first significant work written and recorded entirely in their home country, they rented a studio in Christchurch’s semi-demolished CBD, on one of the few remaining blocks that still characterizes the city from before it was destroyed by a series of earthquakes. “It was as though there was a brief pause in all of our lives and we finally felt like a band from New Zealand,” said Burgess. “We were on home turf and creating from a place that felt fundamentally natural.”

They scare me… every release since EP I has been literal perfection, but somehow they continue to get BETTER AND BETTER with each one

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When you know it’s there, the feeling of rootedness is undeniable on Willowbank. Being connected to their origins on the bottom of the earth allowed the band’s members to craft another essential chapter in the Yumi Zouma storybook.

Released October 6th, 2017

Yumi Zouma is Charlie Ryder, Josh Burgess, Christie Simpson and Sam Perry. All songs written, recorded and produced by Yumi Zouma.

Marlon Williams Album Cover1

The 24-year-old New Zealander already having fronted Christchurch outfit The Unfaithful Ways’ debut LP and co-helmed weird-country triptych Sad But True Vols I – III (with Delaney Davidson), Williams‘ solo debut was overdue. The former chorister delivered on every promise, summoning the vocal performance of the year with an antique penny thrown into a haunted mineshaft: see “When I Was a Young Girl”, Williams‘ desolate take on American folk standard “One Morning In May”. From Western TV-theme charge “Hello Miss Lonesome” to “Dark Child” – a flaying indie-rock elegy for a youth destroyed and birthright forfeited – to haunted house phantasy “Strange Things” (‘she left me alone in a seven-bedroom home built upon the bones of fallen soldiers’), Williams shrouds so much timeless country-folk brilliance in the same creeping, lingering sense of disquiet.

Marlon Williams - Nobody Gets What They Want Anymore

Marlon Williams recently released his new single “Nobody Gets What They Want Anymore” from the upcoming album Make Way For Love set to be released early this year. This single is a duet with fellow New Zealand singer/songwriter Aldous Harding and it feels a lot like we have dipped our ears into their conversation. The two voices blend seamlessly as the title becomes a mantra between them in the chorus. This guitar-driven ballad is timeless and melancholy as it muses over themes of defeat and surrender.

Marlon Williams“Nobody Gets What They Want Anymore” (with Aldous Harding) (Official Video) Album Make Way For Love available February 16th, 2018 on Dead Oceans

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