Posts Tagged ‘Flood’

Reissue on vinyl of the third PJ Harvey studio album to “Bring You My Love”. Produced by PJ Harvey with Flood and John Parish, and originally released in the February 1995, to “Bring You My Love” features the singles ‘Down By The Water’, ‘C’mon Billy’ and ‘Send His Love To Me’. the album – which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year – received wide critical acclaim on release, with nominations for grammy awards and the mercury music prize. reissue is faithful to the original recording and package, cutting by Jason Mitchell at loud mastering under the guidance of longtime PJ Harvey collaborator John Parish.

The album proper is pressed on black vinyl and the packaging is faithful to the original, while the other edition features 10 previously unreleased demos of all the songs from To Bring You My Love and features brand new artwork, with unseen photos by Maria Mochnacz.

Demo audio has been mastered by Jason Mitchell at Loud Mastering under the guidance of John Parish. Mitchell has also cut the vinyl for the album reissue. Both come with a download card and as with Dry, the demos album is also available on CD, in a quite nice gatefold sleeve with printed inner.

Buy Online The Charlatans - Between 10th & 11th (Expanded Edition)

The second album by the British alternative rock band The Charlatans “Between 10th and 11th” was originally released on 23rd March 1992. and features the UK Top 20 hit (and biggest US single) “Weirdo”, as well as singles “Tremolo Song” and “I Don’t Want To See The Sights”.

When Tim Burgess isn’t busy hosting his Twitter listening parties (if you haven’t already, make sure you check them out HERE) or playing as a solo artist, he’s once again riding high with indie icons The Charlatans and to celebrate thirty years since the release of their seminal second album ‘Between 10th and 11th’, the Manchester lads are bringing out a new Expanded Edition.

Between 10th and 11th was originally released in the Spring of 1992 and include such game changing singles as ‘Tremelo Song’ which would become their biggest selling song to the US to date. Criticism within and without settled on Flood’s production style as well, his crisp, technically sharp abilities seem to go against the band’s natural flow. In hindsight, though,it is much stronger than its reputation, with many fans proclaiming it their favorite. It’s partly due to Burgess more up-front vocals.

Similarly, Rob Collins keyboards stand out more, either shading or leading the songs perfectly. “Weirdo,” the album’s lead single and strongest point, has a brilliant lead organ break from Collins and series of great funk stabs that became his strongest performance ever. Equally fine is the electric piano start to “Tremolo Song,” leading to a deep Blunt bass and sassy flow of a song. Mark Collins also fill out their parts equally well, with Flood’s production strengthening and creating excellent arrangements for everyone as a whole. His numerous touches are really something, from the sudden shift to buried/flanged production on “Ignition” to “Subtitle”‘s atmospheric mixing and burbling bass. Other highlights include the string-laden charge of “Can’t Even Be Bothered” and the concluding “No One (Not Even the Rain)”.
‘Between 10th and 11th’ (Expanded Edition) will include a remaster of the original album, plus plenty of bonus material in the form of the entire live disc devoted to their heralded 1991 Chicago gig know as Isolation 21.2.91. – with even more on the bonus CD!

The Band:
Tim Burgess – lead vocals
Mark Collins – guitars
Rob Collins – Mellotron, Hammond organ, piano, backing vocals
Martin Blunt –Bass guitar
Jon Brookes – drums

You can grab a copy of The Charlatans ‘Between 10th and 11th’ (Expanded Edition) right now

Frontperson for British four-piece Savages, Jehnny Beth is releasing her debut solo album, “To Love Is to Live”, on June 12th via Caroline. Now she has shared another song from the album, “Heroine.” The second episode of Echoes, Beth’s music program for the French TV channel Arte, has also recently premiered and it features performances from King Krule, Nilüfer Yanya, and Beak Check out “Heroine” below.

Beth had this to say about “Heroine” in a press release: “When I think of this song, I think of Romy from The xx strangling my neck with her hands in the studio. She was trying to get me out of my shell lyrically, and there was so much resistance in me she lost her patience. The song was originally called ‘Heroism,’ but I wasn’t happy because it was too generic. [The producer] Flood was the first one to suggest to say ‘Heroine’ instead of ‘Heroism.’ Then I remember Johnny Hostile late at night in my hotel room in London saying ‘I don’t understand who you are singing about. Who is the Heroine? You ARE the Heroine.’ The next morning, I arrived early in the studio and recorded my vocals adding ‘to be’ to the chorus line: ‘all I want is To be a heroine.’ Flood entered the studio at that moment and jumped in the air giving me the thumbs up through the window. I guess I’m telling this story because sometimes we look around for role models, and examples to follow, without realizing that the answer can be hidden inside of us. I was afraid to be the Heroine of the song, but it took all the people around me to get me there.”

To Love Is to Live was due out May 8th, but in April it was pushed back to June 12th due to COVID-19.

In November Beth shared the new unrelenting solo song, “I’m the Man,” from the soundtrack of the Netflix/BBC show Peaky Blinders. Then she shared a video for “I’m the Man.” When the album was announced, Beth shared its first single “Flower” announced a new erotic short story collection and photo book, C.A.L.M. (which stands for Crimes Against Love Manifesto). The book features short stories by Beth and photos by Johnny Hostile. C.A.L.M. is due out in July via White Rabbit.

To Love Is to Live was recorded in Los Angeles, London, and Paris with producers Flood, Atticus Ross, and longtime co-creator Johnny Hostile. The album also features The xx’s Romy Madley Croft, Peaky Blinders actor Cillian Murphy, and IDLES’ Joe Talbot.

Number 9.  Brown Acid is back, right on time, with a fresh batch of the dankest hard rock, heavy psych, and proto-metal bangers you’ve never heard before. As usual, all of these tracks were licensed legitimately and the artists were paid. It ain’t easy, but it’s the right thing to do! And although the quantity keeps rising, our quality control hasn’t suffered. You won’t find even one throwaway track here, or on any volume, just pure unadulterated heaviness from the after-Altamont era. This Trip is All-American, and in addition to the eight 45 sourced jams and one hard rock holy grail LP track, it includes a previously unheard song by a completely unknown band that’ll melt your mind. So crack a cold one, crank the volume knob, and let the Brown Acid seep into your skull yet again.

Garage turkeys have long been familiar with the Minnesota-based group The Litter, who have some very collectible 45s and LPs, but the related band, White Lightning, isn’t nearly as well-known. White Lightning released only one single and one LP (under the name Lightning), but they had far more recordings than they released, and “Prelude To Opus IV” is just one of the band’s many outstanding unreleased tracks. White Lightning took the chops the ex-members developed in The Litter and kicked it up a notch in the heaviness department. They were risk-takers and innovators and were the first Power Trio and first to play through Marshall full-stacks in the Upper Midwest. Their guitarist was the first to play a Flying V in the region. They also happened to be named after LSD. Brown Acid material all the way!

Jon Uzonyi’s Peacepipe released one single in 1969 on the eclectic California-based Accent label, and it’s one of the most scarce Brown Acid inclusions. It’s crunchy as hell from the get-go, and the psychedelic touches only add to its allure. Lyrically, it’ll empty your half-full cup in a heartbeat, and the thunderous drums and gigantic guitar riffs will make you want to refill your glass immediately… with the hard stuff.

In 1975, Tom Stevens and the rest of Magi went into Uncle Dirty’s Sound Machine in Kalamazoo, Michigan and recorded nine tracks. Just 1000 copies of the LP were pressed, and its title and lead-off track is “Win Or Lose” from their self-released 45. The long-player has been bootlegged at least twice, but until now, Magi’s recordings have never been legitimately reissued. This revved-up, rural proto-punk cut has enough snarl to start a fight, but the vibe leaves you with the impression that the brawlers will bond over beers no matter who comes out on top!

“The Rise of Flood” by the New York group, Flood, is one of the best LPs released in 1970. Its extreme rarity is the only logical explanation for its ridiculous underrated-ness. Before Flood, the same group released a 45 under the, obviously radical name, Fiberglass Vegetables. The laid-back heaviness on this rural banger will hook ya immediately. The B-side is a non-LP track which you’ll be hearing on a future Trip if you choose to stay turned on and tuned in!

Sid Bradley is Erik. Erik is Sid Bradley. And he self-released this 45 on his own Eden imprint back in ’73. “Rebel Woman” is an up-tempo banger that resides where hard rock and prog overlap. The composition, performance, and recording quality is exceptional. It probably sounds like a magnum opus compared to some of the other stuff we’ve included in this series, but it still fits. By the way, Sid is still writing and recording music, which is not surprising considering how accomplished he is. His recent releases can very easily be found online.

Stonewall’s story is one of the most tragic in rock history. These guys should have been huge, and to say that they were robbed, is the understatement of the century. A very different story of rock stardom could have been told if it weren’t for egregious mismanagement, and a loophole in the law at the time that allowed labels to blindly rip off bands in order to minimize their tax liability. However, like a phoenix from the ashes, the Stonewall record survived over 40 years of neglect, and it now holds its place in rock history as one of the greatest records that almost never saw the light of day. “Outer Spaced” is just one of the eight tracks that we could have included on here from their sole LP, which was recorded in 1972, and “released” on Tiger Lily in 1976. In 2019, Permanent Records legitimately issued it for the first time EVER on vinyl and digitally.

The Zukus 45 has been in the collection for quite some time, and for that amount of time, we’ve been “looking high, looking low” to track down the members of the band. If Zukus were a snake, they would’ve bit us! Right under our noses, Zukus had an online presence unlike any other band we’ve worked with before, but, under a different name: Ice, which is the preferred moniker of Jim Lee’s group. “For some reason,” they used the name Zukus (pronounced zuck-us) for their sole 45 on Toya Records back in 1972. Pack this organ-driven, break-beat-laden banger in your pipe and smoke it!

Space Rock was comprised of a group of Macedonian immigrants living in Detroit, Michigan, none of whom spoke English. At one time, the vocalist, George Bisinov, even won first place in a Macedonian music festival in Detroit! Despite the language barrier, they rocked like red-blooded Americans and both sides of their 45 are top notch. The A-side “Dark Days” is a dirgier affair, whereas “Going Down The Road” locks into a speedy riff fairly quickly after the bizarro circus intro, and it never lets up. According to George, Space Rock recorded numerous other original songs, but they’ve been lost to tape deterioration. If only we could have saved them!

On the phone, Jim Fulton of Buckshot is a very soft-spoken, polite, and humble Texan. Hard to believe considering how macho his delivery is on “Bar Star”! This track is generally cocky in the best possible way. Dual lead guitars take center stage on this shreddy groover and, at just over two minutes in length, it’s a wham-bam-thank-you-ma’am jam if there ever was one. Hamilton St. Records out of Houston supposedly released this back in 1976, but based on how rare it is, it’s hard to believe it was ever released at all.

Brown Acid can be found in some of the least likely places, as long as you can pay close attention. One iota of distraction could’ve caused 29.9 to have remained in obscurity for another 50 years! This band came into our lives while watching the cult horror film Effects. The film is entertaining to say the least, but the star for us is a very short clip of background music in a scene where one of the characters is looking through a stack of bondage polaroids. As the photos are being flipped through, a boombox blasts a Pentagram-esque hard rocker that caught our attention immediately. We tracked down the director of the film, John Harrison. Turns out the song in Effects was by a band John played in with his brother, Doug, and a couple of other guys in the late-60s. They called themselves 29.9, and they recorded “Paradiddle Blues” and a few other tracks, but never released any of them, until now.
Thank YOU for supporting the Brown Acid series. The Tenth Trip is just around the bend.