Posts Tagged ‘Aldous Harding’

Image may contain: screen

Aldous Harding release her third album, “Designer”, on 4AD Records. Designer finds the New Zealander hitting her creative stride. After the sleeper success of the internationally lauded Party, Harding came off a 100-date tour last summer and went straight into the studio with a collection of songs written on the road. Reuniting with John Parish, producer of Party, Harding spent 15 days recording and 10 days mixing at Rockfield Studios, Monmouth and Bristol’s J&J Studio and Playpen.

The New Zealand songwriter Aldous Harding with her third studio album “Designer”. At first glance it’s another album of her signature soft-spoken folk sound, but this time around there’s more meat on the bones. It’s her first record with drums on almost every song, and a broader instrumental palate lends the album a newfound sense of gravity. The emotional lows are lower and the highs are even higher than before.

From the bold strokes of opening track “Fixture Picture”, there is an overriding sense of an artist confident in their work, with contributions from Huw Evans (H. Hawkline), Stephen Black (Sweet Baboo), drummer Gwion Llewelyn and violinist Clare Mactaggart broadening and complimenting Harding’s rich and timeless songwriting.

The amazing new album from Aldous Harding is out today on 4AD Records/Flying Nun Records, on limited gold vinyl pressing.

Advertisements

Designer finds Singer songwriter Aldous Harding hitting her creative stride.  After Party, Harding came off a 100-date tour last summer and went straight into the studio with a collection of songs written on the road.  Reuniting with John Parish, producer of Party, Harding spent 15 days recording and 10 days mixing at Rockfield Studios, Monmouth and Bristol’s J&J Studio and Playpen.

From the bold strokes of opening track ‘Fixture Picture’, there is an overriding sense of an enigmatic artist confident in their work, with contributions from Huw Evans (H. Hawkline), Stephen Black (Sweet Baboo), drummer Gwion Llewelyn and violinist Clare Mactaggart broadening and complimenting Harding’s rich and timeless songwriting.

‘Fixture Picture’ by Aldous Harding, from the new album ‘Designer’. Released on 4AD/Flying Nun on 26th April 2019,

Aldous Harding - Designer

'Designer'

The first single ‘The Barrel’ has been launched today, with a delightfully off-kilter accompanying video that transmutes to film the intense and commanding energy seen in Harding’s live shows. Designer finds the New Zealander hitting her creative stride.  After Party, Harding came off a 100-date tour last summer and went straight into the studio with a collection of songs written on the road.  Reuniting with John Parish, producer of Party, Harding spent 15 days recording and 10 days mixing at Rockfield Studios, Monmouth and Bristol’s J&J Studio and Playpen.  From the bold strokes of opening track ‘Fixture Picture’, there is an overriding sense of an enigmatic artist confident in their work, with contributions from Huw Evans (H. Hawkline), Stephen Black (Sweet Baboo), drummer Gwion Llewelyn and violinist Clare Mactaggart broadening and complimenting Harding’s rich and timeless songwriting.

‘The Barrel’, by Aldous Harding. New album ‘Designer’ will be released on 4AD/Flying Nun on 26th April 2019.

Image result for aldous harding photos

In anticipation of the coveted Silver Scroll Award, Lyttelton chanteuse Aldous Harding has shared a stand-alone single titled ‘Elation’. The graceful acoustic arrangement was recorded in Bristol during the sessions for the songstress’ sophomore offering Party. with John Parish:

Harding’s tune ‘Horizon’ is nominated for the aforementioned Silver Scroll Award, alongside an all-lady shortlist which includes LordeBic RungaChelsea Jade and Nadia Reid. The ceremony is being held in Dunedin this evening. In the meantime, soak up ‘Elation’ below…

Image may contain: 1 person, on stage

In the new video for her song “Blend,” the New Zealand singer/songwriter Aldous Harding references that scene, dressing in the lead Playmates cowboy-bikini gear and doing the same sorts of herky-jerk go-go dances. The difference is that with the blank white background and the sparse beauty of Harding’s songs, the spectacle becomes even more eerie and unearthly. 

Charlotte Evans, who also helmed Harding’s “Imagining My Man” video, directs.

‘Blend’ by Aldous Harding, from the album ‘Party’. Out now on 4AD/Flying Nun Records

New Zealand songwriter Aldous Harding released her new album, “Party”, .  Featuring the singles ‘Horizon’ and ‘Imagining My Man’, her second long-player has been universally applauded.  She will make her debut TV appearance next week, performing ‘Horizon’ on the BBC’s Later…with Jools Holland.

Party was produced with the award-winning John Parish (PJ Harvey, Sparklehorse) in his hometown of Bristol, taking Harding away from her New Zealand base for an intensive two-week immersion in the studio.  As well as a raft of musical contributions from Parish, Perfume Genius’ Mike Hadreas lends vocals to recent single ‘Imagining My Man’ and Party closer ‘Swell Does The Skull’.

Like her record, Harding speaks slowly, in deeply considered sentences, her chin perched on books as she smoked a cigarette. Harding’s roots are in New Zealand’s almost bizarrely fertile folk scene — a former roommate, Nadia Reid, has also drawn international eyes — but some time early in the creation of the songs for Party, something shifted, she says. Going over the record song-by-song, Harding says that the turning point arrived while she was writing what would become the album’s title track, a song with that slowly swells into a chorus that cracks its shell of restraint, emerging as something almost operatic. “When I heard the chorus [of ‘Party’] in my head I kind of went, ‘I don’t know if I’m allowed to do that,'” she says. “I’ve done something different, and it feels much better. Fits better. And I… went for it, by the sounds of it,” she laughs. “I just got stuck in it, Party’s velvet-soft sound is a bedding for a gifted weapon-of-a voice. Harding puts on so many masks throughout the album — the shriek, the sullen smoker, the concerned love — but there’s something calmly self-assured behind the costume changes. She’s always wearing the same shirt. As we spoke, she thought aloud that, maybe, the record is a document of self-imposed isolation in some way, a reckoning with ambition and the costs of trying deeply. Have you ever exiled yourself in order to try and be completely yourself and see what magic may come of it?.

Imagining My Man 

“It’s just about all of the… tender and frightening thoughts that come with being in love. And growing up, and trying to figure out what the hell it is that you want. And trying to love another person, when you’re constantly pushing your own plate away, isn’t easy. It’s no one’s fault, that’s just how it happens sometimes. You’ve just got to ride it out.”

Horizon

“Good-bye — and not necessarily for any reason at all other than… I’ve got to go. I’m showing that person two things; their life, and their life with me. And I’m taking one of them away. And that’s me.

“In a lot of ways it was me choosing art over a person, which I didn’t necessarily know at the time. And feeling like, in order to do it how I need to do it, I need to be on my own. There are people who like to sit at a dining table with six other people and listen to John Coltrane, [Blue] Train and pour wine. I love that too, but I’m the kind of person who if you give me a plate of food, you give me money or… alcohol…. I want to take it in to the dark on my own, so no one has to see how I approach it. Maybe that’s an insecurity, I don’t know. I don’t feel particularly insecure about it.”

Swell Does The Skull

“Yeah, it’s closer to the first record in the sense that it’s got that kind of… back. It’s not so… modern. It’s got an arc. There’s still an archaic fume to that one.”

What If Birds Aren’t Singing They’re Screaming

“The song is quite humorous, but at the same time I think it’s kind of Randy Newman-esque — there’s like, a deep sadness inside that jolly sound.

“For like four or five months of my life I was too scared to like, move around and reach out for things because I was worried that I’d my hands would run into glass, like I could reach up and if I reached up and knocked on the air it would make a noise. I couldn’t look at the sky because I was worried that I see a crack. And like, light would start to come. Not nice light — like, someone else’s sunlight. I didn’t like that.

“It was pretty… rough, coming up with it. Because questions like that are what keep people frightened. Not trusting that things are real. This is stuff you think about when you do drugs, this is the stuff that will drive you nuts. I guess that’s why I kept it kind of upbeat and humorous, because I don’t want to frighten people, just wanted to remind them that that’s normal. And it’s real — as real as the stuff you worry isn’t. And just don’t f****** worry about it. Because at the end of the day it’s actually quite funny.”

Aldous Harding - Party

An artist of rare calibre, Aldous Harding does more than sing; she conjures a singular intensity.  Her body and face a weapon of theatre, Harding dances with steeled fervor, baring her teeth like a Bunraku puppet’s gnashing grin.

Her debut release with 4AD Records, “Party” (produced with the award-winning John Parish; PJ Harvey, Sparklehorse) introduces a new pulse to the stark and unpopulated dramatic realm where the likes of Kate Bush and Scott Walker reside.

Comprising a formidable clutch of songs, 2017’s Party sees Harding shape-shift through a variety of roles: chanteuse, folk singer and balladeer – all executed with her twisted touch of humour, hubris and quiet horror.  In other words, she’s having a good time.  Stretching her limbs with playful cunning; every note, word and arrangement posed with intellect and inventiveness.

Created in Parish’s hometown of Bristol, “Party” saw Aldous Harding depart her New Zealand base in the antipodes for an intensive two-week immersion in the studio.  Articulating her ambitions for “Party” to Parish was a galvanizing process for Harding, met with stunning results.  The pair developed a near non-verbal shorthand, audibly evident in a raft of musical contributions from Parish.  Alongside such special guests as Perfume Genius’ Mike Hadreas (having worked with Parish and toured with Aldous, it only took asking once), there is an exhilarating sense of risk throughout the record as Harding’s muscular wingspan extends.  Teased out with inflections of experimental instrumentation and arrangements; “Party” is always anchored by Aldous’s intimidating command of her own songs.

First single ‘Horizon’ is a lover’s call to arms, powerful for its brutal simplicity and rawness of feeling, love and loathing colliding to devastating effect.  “Aldous Harding repeats the line as a mantra, as a truth, as a reality. It’s as if the gift of life is right here, with all its beauty and its limitations”, said NPR.

‘Imagining My Man’ commands an air of delicacy as Aldous explores the curiosity of a lover’s idiosyncrasies; steering listeners into a state of intense intimacy laced with hyperactive shots, dirgey saxophone and Harding’s aching voice.  The track is one of two that Mike Hadreas lends his inimitably sultry vocals to, the other being the intimate Party closer ‘Swell Does The Skull’.

‘Blend’ sensitively ushers the mood of Harding’s flourishment throughout Party.  Its opening lines a nod to the mood of Harding’s last record; sameness is quickly quashed with an electronic drumbeat and the announcement of Aldous Harding as an artist of stirring ambition and trajectory.

The album’s eponymous single ‘Party’ harks to Aldous’ earlier work; delicately pulling at the threads of a seemingly late-night love affair.  Again, it’s not long until the rug is pulled out, with a searing chorus – Harding’s electrifying vocal accompanied by a choir of women and waves of percussive bass clarinet – piercing the balloon of expectations around Harding’s new record with effortless vigour.

Party

On 19th May 2017, Aldous Harding releases her second album, “Party”.

Party was produced with the award-winning John Parish (PJ Harvey, Sparklehorse) in Bristol, a world away from Harding’s New Zealand home.  As well as contributions from Parish, Perfume Genius’s Mike Hadreas lends vocals to ‘Imagining My Man’ and “Party” closer ‘Swell Does The Skull’.

Igniting interest with her eponymous debut album released just two years ago, Aldous Harding quickly became a name murmured on many lips.  She’s known for her sinister torch songs, gentle laments and eerie odes delivered with a charismatic combination of hubris, shrewd wit and quiet horror.  Party introduces a new talent to the stark and unpopulated dramatic realm where Kate Bush and Scott Walker reside.

‘Imagining My Man’ by Aldous Harding, from forthcoming album ‘Party’. Released 19th May on 4AD/Flying Nun:

http://

Aldous Harding aka Hannah and another track from this fabulous debut mini-album

http://

New Zealand based singer songwriter (Aka Hannah) just released her debut album on Lyttleton Records retro-folk with soft plucked acoustic guitar and a just lovely vocal. thanks to justmusicthatilike.com