Posts Tagged ‘Iggy Pop’

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Iggy Pop is releasing a new album, “Free”, on September 6th via Loma Vista. he shared its first single, short title track “Free.” This week he shared the album’s second single, “James Bond,” which seems to be about a woman who wants to be a superspy. The song features additional vocals from Faith Vern of the British band PINS and a notable trumpet solo played by Leron Thomas.

Iggy Pop had this to say about the song in a press release: “I don’t know what she’s up to exactly, but the tables seem to be turning, and she’s taking over. Well, why not? I’ll try anything once.”

Pop adds: “I’ve never had more fun singing a lyric. Faith’s reading is so loaded, and Leron’s production and trumpet along with the band swings like crazy.”

Freeis the follow-up to 2016’s Post Pop Depression, which was produced by Josh Homme of Eagles of Death Metal and Queens of the Stone Age, who also co-wrote the album with Pop and played on it. In 2018 Pop also teamed up with the iconic British dance duo Underworld (Karl Hyde and Rick Smith) for the collaborative four-song EP, Teatime Dub Encounters. Free was made with help of Leron Thomas and Noveller. A previous press release called the album a “uniquely somber and contemplative entry in the Iggy Pop canon.”

Pop had this to say about the album in the previous press release: “This is an album in which other artists speak for me, but I lend my voice… “By the end of the tours following Post Pop Depression, I felt sure that I had rid myself of the problem of chronic insecurity that had dogged my life and career for too long.

“But I also felt drained. And I felt like I wanted to put on shades, turn my back, and walk away. I wanted to be free. I know that’s an illusion, and that freedom is only something you feel, but I have lived my life thus far in the belief that that feeling is all that is worth pursuing; all that you need – not happiness or love necessarily, but the feeling of being free.

“So this album just kind of happened to me, and I let it happen.”

This is first new Iggy Pop album since 2016’s Post Pop Depression, will be released September 6th on Caroline International/Loma Vista.

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Originally released on Animal Records in 1982 and produced by Chris Stein of Blondie, “Zombie Birdhouse” is something of a lost classic. This album may just be Iggy’s Morrison Hotel; like that Doors classic, Zombie Birdhouse takes an almost novelistic look at the character of America that is by turns funny and angry, reverential and irreverent. It’s filled, too, with an almost mystical primitivism that brings out the shaman in Iggy’s soul. Throughout, Iggy’s collaborator, guitarist-keyboardist Rob duPrey, manages to produce some fascinating noise by altering, filtering and treating his instruments. A heady concoction of drones, Afrobeats and freeform lyrics, the album was Iggy’s 6th solo studio album and represents him at his freewheeling best.Chris Stein and Clem Burke of Blondie provide the exotic rhythmic spice that seasons this record to perfection. The sleeve notes have been written by long time Iggy fan Irvine Welsh.

A visual for lead single ‘The Villagers’ is unveiled as a taster of the album,

The reissue of Zombie Birdhouse has been remastered by Paschal Byrne at The Audio Archive, London. It features the singles ‘Run Like A Villain’ and ‘The Villagers’ along with rare photographs from the original photo-shoot by Esther Friedman.

The CD edition is Expanded with the addition of a Bonus Track in the form of the original version of Pain and Suffering, which features fellow Blondie band member Debbie Harry on backing vocals. The song was originally recorded for the ground-breaking animated feature film, Rock and Rule (Iggy provided the voice of the Monster From Another Dimension and Debbie Harry the voice for the character, Angel) but the OST was never released.

No one wonders why bands still love to cover “I Wanna be Your Dog” in 2014. In fact, even in its much tamer studio version, The Stooges’ feedback-heavy force of a song still out-fought most hard-rockers in ’69, only being outdone by Detroit brothers The MC5. It’s a blistering piece of proto-punk, one that set the stage for any outlandish, fuzzed-out guitar line that would follow in a garage, and Iggy Pop’s unforgettable wails—“Now I wanna be your dog!”—can’t be unheard.

“I Wanna Be Your Dog” by The Stooges is one of the nastiest, filthiest, sexiest rock blasts of all time with its repetitive and monstrous guitar drone, Iggy‘s horny barks and that single-note piano riff played by producer John Cale (then member of The Velvet Underground). The single was released back in 1969 and a couple of decades later Sonic Youth played a S-H-A-T-T-E-R-I-N-G live version on some American TV Show with a bunch of crazed guests, including a far-out saxophonist and… a mental flutist.

I Wanna Be Your Dog” is a 1969 song by the American rock band The Stooges. The song is included on their self-titled debut album. Its memorable riff, composed of only three chords (G, F♯ and E), is played continuously throughout the song (excepting two brief 4-bar bridges). The 3-minute-and-9-second-long song, with its raucous, distortion-heavy guitar intro, pounding, single-note piano riff played by producer John Cale and steady, driving beat, established The Stooges at the cutting edge example of the heavy metal and punk sound.The song notably uses sleigh bells throughout.

Underworld-Iggy-Pop-Teatime-Dub-Encounters

Last month, British electronic godheads Underworld teamed with American Garage punk Iggy Pop for a surprise collaborative track, “Bells & Circles.” It was a transfixing composition, Underworld’s charging and pulsating electronic backdrop underpinning a sort of intensifying spoken-word poem from Pop. The tone was also a curious one, with Pop reminiscing about the days where you could smoke on airplanes and hit on flight attendants, things it is quite plausible Pop legitimately misses. And yet, there was something more going on there, like he was doing some kind of performative piss-take on “Those were the days”-type recollections. “Bells & Circles” was more engaging than it needed to be given that the pedigree of the artists involved alone made it interesting.

This was the lead single and opening track of a full EP from Underworld and Pop, titled Teatime Dub Encounters and due out at the end of July. The origins of the project go back to when Underworld were supervising the soundtrack to last year’s Trainspotting sequel.

As you might recall, the first Trainspotting soundtrack was iconic and influential, and the film was bookended by an Iggy Pop classic and Underworld’s soon-to-be-classic “Born Slippy ” they all met up in London to discuss the prospect of writing new music for the second Trainspotting given their shared connection to the original.

Apparently Underworld’s Rick Smith set up basically a whole studio in a hotel room, and they all did a few low-key sessions. Here’s what Pop had to say about the process:

When you are confronted with somebody who has a whole bloody studio there in the hotel room, a Skyped director who has won the Oscar recently, and a fucking microphone in front of you and 30 finished pieces of very polished music, you don’t want to be the wimp that goes “Uh uhhh,” so my mind was racing.

The idea of Iggy Pop of all people being somewhat intimidated is really something! None of the material they worked on there wound up on the T2 Trainspotting soundtrack in the end, But for now that it’s been compiled for Teatime Dub Encounters.

Along with the announcement, they also shared a second song from the EP, “I’ll See Big.” The new single is quite a different beast than “Bells & Circles.” A celestial, ambient composition, “I’ll See Big” provides an impressionistic piece for Pop to once more go into spoken-word meditation mode. This time around, it’s a lot less frantic, and a lot more ruminative, Pop’s age giving him a natural gravity and grit in his voice as he reflects on friendships through the decades, and what a few might think of him when he’s gone. The lyrics were supposedly inspired by a conversation Pop had with Trainspotting director Danny Boyle about the film’s underlying core themes of friendship.

TRACKLIST:

01 “Bells & Circles”
02 “Trapped”
03 “I’ll See Big”
04 “Get Your Shirt”

Underworld & Iggy Pop I’ll See Big From the EP: Teatime Dub Encounters  via Caroline International.

Bloody Iggy

A few days prior to their run of shows at Max’s Kansas City in July/August 1973,  The Stooges arrived in Manhattan to rehearse. The band’s label provided a practice space in midtown, and tapes were made so Iggy and the band could hear themselves. Years later, the recordings were released, and they were a revelation. Iggy was absolutely on fire during these rehearsals. There are moments when his vocals are even more violent and unhinged than anything heard on the band’s studio LPs or their infamous live album, “Metallic KO .” Though the practice tapes lack the fidelity of those seminal releases, the intensity comes through all the same.

After a long delay, The Stooges third album, “Raw Power   “ was finally released in May 1973. The previous March, after clashes with management came to head, James Williamson was forced out of the group, but after the company dropped Iggy and the Stooges, he was welcomed back into the fold. The band also added a new member, Scott Thurston, to play piano and harmonica.

A number of friends attended the Max’s rehearsals, which were held at a studio owned by CBS Records. Natalie Schlossman, former head of the Stooges fan club, was there, as was original bassist, Dave Alexander, amongst others. With the impending high-profile dates, and as so many were watching, The Stooges gave it their all. At one point, Iggy got on top of the studio’s grand piano to cut a rug.

The Stooges

Recordings of the Max’s rehearsals appear on a number of archival releases, beginning with Rubber Legs  ( 1987), the first in a string of quasi-legal albums comprised of previously unreleased Stooges tapes that flooded the market in the late ‘80s. In 2005, Easy Action Records put out the Stooges-approved boxed set of outtakes and such, Heavy Liquid an abridged version was produced for Record Store Day . One of the six discs contains the Max’s show, as well as seven recordings from the Max’s rehearsals. All of the songs pulled from the practice tape were, at the time, newly worked-up tunes that, in the end, wouldn’t be formally recorded by The Stooges.

Heavy Liquid

“Johanna” (later documented for the Kill City project) is particularly powerful. Said to be about a former girlfriend that got her kicks by playing mind games on the Stooges singer, the tape captures Iggy totally tortured, screaming his head off over a love he knows is toxic, but can’t quit.

The haunting ballad, “Open up and Bleed,” is another intense one. Iggy’s vocals are positively hair-raising here.  The second Max’s Kansas City gig is the one in which Iggy, as he was walking on tables in the club—with attendees including Wayne County, Lenny Kaye and Alice Cooper looking on—slipped and fell on a table full of glasses. When he stood up, his chest was covered in blood . Though thoroughly cut, he finished the show.

  • Iggy Pop – lead vocals
  • James Williamson – guitar
  • Ron Asheton – bass, backing vocals
  • Scott Asheton – drums
  • Scott Thurston – piano

Touring in support of their joint album “Post Pop Depression”, rock icon Iggy Pop and Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme put together a tour as fierce as their recording. The show was an impressive feat of ageless, timeless rock. Pop alternated between sweet grandpa-like waves and blowing kisses in between songs to youthful raunchiness—humping monitors, sticking the microphone in his pants, and leading the crowd in a riotous chant of, “Fuck! Fuck! Fuck!” And for their part, the band—dressed in sparkly red tuxedo blazers, white dress shirts, and black ties—provided a rock-solid musical foundation. With Homme (who produced and co-wrote Post Pop Depression) on one guitar, multi-instrumentalist Dean Fertita of Queens of the Stone Age, drummer Matt Helders of Arctic Monkeys, and two additional musicians, the six-piece group performed the new songs with the same intensity as those from Lust for Life and The Idiot.

Good Time Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

Oneohtrix Point Never’s ‘The Pure and the Damned’ video, starring Robert Pattinson, Benny Safdie, and Iggy Pop. Directed By The Safdie Brothers and taken from Oneohtrix Point Never’s Cannes 2017 award winning ‘Good Time Original Motion Picture Soundtrack’, out now via Warp Records.

A computer-animated Iggy Pop stars alongside Robert Pattinson in the strange new video for Oneohtrix Point Never’s “The Pure and the Damned.” Oneohtrix Point Never and Iggy Pop collaborated on the song as part of the former’s soundtrack for Good Time, the Safdie Brothers’ while Benny Safdie appears in the clip as well.

The clip opens with CGI Iggy Pop standing shirtless – of course – outside a house in the woods, singing the haunting piano ballad. Eventually the animated punk star appears inside the house, sitting on Pattinson’s bed and watching as the actor tries to force Safdie’s character to eat something. “The Pure and the Damned” takes an eerie, synth-heavy turn as Pattinson’s character walks outside and follows a trail of detritus to a strange wolf-like creature feasting on the innards of another animal. Wielding a sword, Pattinson engages the beast in a stare down that’s tense yet tinged with a sense of camp and melodrama.

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Eagle Rock Entertainment will release American Valhalla – the vivid documentary tracing the musical journey of Iggy Pop and Joshua Homme – on DVD and digital formats on March 9th.

Something miraculous happens when two kindred spirits collaborate…which is exactly what happened when Iggy Pop and Queens Of The Stone Age frontman Joshua Homme joined forces to create Pop’s 2016 album Post Pop DepressionAmerican Valhalla, co-directed by Homme and Andreas Neumann, traces this union – from the initial songwriting sessions and recording process to the subsequent critically-acclaimed Post Pop Depression tour.

Originally released in theaters via More2Screen and Eagle Rock Films in the summer of 2017, American Valhalla goes beyond a behind-the-scenes music documentary. Presented via Neumann’s stunning photography and cinematography, with intimate conversations led by Anthony Bourdain, the film explores themes of taking chances, instincts, and legacy. As Homme stated, “You risk nothing, you gain nothing” – a mantra echoed throughout the film’s 81 minutes.

Once inspired by Pop’s revolutionary raw brand of rock to make music of his own, everything comes full circle when Homme is contacted by his idol, out of the blue, to work on some songs. We see them meet, write and record (in total secrecy) at Rancho De La Luna studio in the Mojave Desert with Queens of the Stone Age’s Dean Fertita (guitarist) and Arctic Monkeys’ Matt Helders (drummer). The lens is set on these interactions, as we watch these relationships evolve. Between lyric sheets, letters, journal entries, and riffs, viewers can experience the organic chemistry that blossomed into Post Pop Depression.

“As we got to know each other, you blew my mind” Homme tells Pop in the film. “You really came with such an open mind and saying ‘Yeah, I know what I’ve done but I’m here to…look forward.’”

As they prepared the tour to support the album, Iggy received news of the passing of David Bowie – his longtime friend and confidant. In these moments, Pop contemplates his own impermanence and, at his most vulnerable, pushes harder with carpe diem-resolve to rehearse and add the next great landmark to his legacy. PopHommeFertita, and Helders, are joined by Troy Van Leeuwen (guitarist – Queens of the Stone Age) and Matt Sweeney (bassist/guitarist) as they hit the road.

American Valhalla sets its scope onstage and backstage as they warm up, pump each other up, and deliver explosive sets, leading up to the final show at the Royal Albert Hall in London (captured on Post Pop Depression: Live From The Royal Albert Hall DVD and Blu-ray released via Eagle Rock Entertainment in 2016.

Back in 1999, Rhino Handmade had an early triumph with the release of the 7-CD box set The Fun House Sessions, chronicling the making of the album from the quintessential proto-punk bad boys, The Stooges.  Now Run Out Groove has boiled down that set into four sides of vinyl and fourteen choice selections as “Highlights from The Fun House Sessions”.  Recorded with producer Don Gallucci of The Kingsmen at Elektra Sound Recorders in Los Angeles back in May 1970 as The Stooges’ sophomore effort, Fun House made “Louie, Louie” look positively tame, and was commercially unsuccessful upon its initial release.  But its influence as a key building block in the punk revolution can’t go unnoticed, as it quickly developed a cult following among both critics and fans.  Blending fast and furious hard rock with improvisation and even a jazz element thanks to Steve Mackay’s saxophone and the loose feel, Fun House showed Iggy Pop, Dave Alexander, Ron Asheton, Scott Asheton, and Mackay at their most primal yet still pushing the musical envelope forward.

The first two sides of Highlights are sequenced to follow the track order of the original LP, with the third and fourth sides offering additional alternate takes, fly-on-the-wall studio chatter, and a 17-minute jam session/early version of the closing “L.A. Blues” entitled “Freak.”  There are plenty of ferocious nuggets here that are illuminating to fans of the original album but accessible enough to be enjoyed on their own.  Take 6 (Reel # 6) of “Down on the Street,” the lone A-side drawn from Fun House in its final version, spellbindingly pulsates.  The taut garage band performance on “Loose” (Take 16, Reel 4) is almost-but-not-quite-commercial, no small accomplishment for The Stooges.  Like Alexander’s throbbing bass on “Dirt” (Take 5, Reel 11) or Ron Asheton’s screaming guitar on “1970” (Take 2, Reel 1), Iggy Pop’s throaty wail on “See That Cat (T.V. Eye)” (Reel 2) explodes with no compromises.  Desperation drips from his raspy delivery on “Lost in the Future” (Take 3, Reel 3).  Outtake “Slide (Slidin’ the Blues)” offers something a bit different, with Mackay’s tenor sax wending through the bluesy drawl.  Everything about Fun House is even more primal and raw in these alternate versions – musically unflinching, brutal, and immediate.

Designed by Peto Gerth, Highlights from The Fun House Sessions boasts a glossy gatefold with new liner notes.  In a fine touch, the two multi-colored swirl 180-gram LPs, stored in protective sleeves, have vintage Elektra butterfly replica labels.  With The Complete Fun House Sessions long out-of-print in CD format, this vinyl collection of screeching, raw power is a welcome arrival.

Special Edition

LIMITED TO A QUANTITY OF 400 NUMBERED COPIES.

Third Man Books is pleased to announce our SIGNED SPECIAL EDITION of TOTAL CHAOS: The Story of The Stooges / As Told by Iggy Pop by Jeff Gold. Each Special Edition is signed by Iggy Pop himself, includes for the first time on vinyl two songs from Iggy’s pre-Stooges band THE PRIME MOVERS, and three reproduction Stooges posters co-billing the legendary band with the likes of John Coltrane, MC5, and more! Extremely limited edition.

EXCLUSIVE TO THE SPECIAL EDITION: Each Special Edition has a custom-made signature book plate that is SIGNED and NUMBERED by Iggy Pop himself* Includes a limited edition, first time available on vinyl,two-song single of Iggy’s pre-Stooges band The Prime Movers* Three exclusive reproductions of original Stooges posters* Book cover is specially printed in metallic gold ink* Available only from Third Man Books

*The first book to tell the story of The Stooges from Iggy Pop’s own words*Includes hundreds of rare and unseen photos*Additional contributions from Ben Blackwell, Dave Grohl, Josh Homme, Joan Jett, Johnny Marr, and Jack White*Rolling Stone ranked The Stooges in their Top 100 Artists of All Time*The Stooges are a Rock n Roll Hall of Fame inductee.*Author Jeff Gold wrote the best selling 101 Essential Rock Records*Editor Jon Savage wrote the best selling book England’s Dreaming: Anarchy, Sex Pistols, Punk Rock, and Beyond.

[The Stooges] took it to a place that no one else ever had. I think that they made such a lasting impression on musicians for decades to come.—Dave Grohl

Those first three Stooges records are to me perfect rock ‘n’ roll—absolutely perfect. It’s sweet enough for the girls and tough enough for the guys. It doesn’t care about you, you have to care about it.—Josh Homme

For me, Iggy and The Stooges have to be one of the greatest American rock bands that have ever been.—Joan Jett

Discovering The Stooges helped to change my life.—Johnny Marr

The Stooges’ Fun House is to me the very definition of Detroit rock ‘n’ roll, and by proxy the definitive rock album of America.—Jack White