GIMMIE DANGER – A Film By Jim Jarmusch

Posted: May 7, 2020 in MUSIC
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You might expect this documentary about legendary wild man Iggy Pop made by indie film maverick Jim Jarmusch to be a little more dangerous, but “Gimme Danger” plays it pretty straight. And that’s okay, as Jarmusch offers up this “love letter” to The Stooges, who he calls “The greatest rock and roll band ever.” Featuring interviews with most parties involved, Gimme Danger makes a great case for that, as the film goes from Iggy’s high school days when he was known simply as James Osterberg Jr, to hooking up with Ron and Scott Asheton who created a whole new sound. Or, as Iggy told ’70s daytime talk show host Dinah Shore in an infamous mid-’70s television appearance with David Bowie, “I think I helped wipe out the ’60s.”

The film follows the rise, fall and reunion of the Stooges, formed in Ann Arbor, Michigan in the 1967 by singer Iggy Pop, bassist Dave Alexander, and brothers Ron Asheton and Scott Asheton on guitar and drums respectively. Guitarist James Williamson eventually joined the band, with Ron Asheton switching to bass after Alexander was fired.

The band found little success during the first phase of their career, recording three albums that did not sell as well as their record companies expected, and performing for audiences that were largely indifferent or hostile. They broke up in 1974, and the band members went their separate ways with vocalist Pop establishing a moderately successful solo career. In time, the Stooges proved highly influential on the development of punk rock in the 1970s.

The Stooges’ original lineup reformed in 2003, with bassist Mike Watt replacing the late Alexander. Ron Asheton died in 2009, and Williamson rejoined the band for their fifth and final album.

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