Posts Tagged ‘Third Man Records’

Vault 47 Jack White Live At the Masonic Temple

Jack White will release his July 30th, 2014 concert at Detroit’s Masonic Temple on vinyl via Third Man Records, the singer-songwriter announced on Monday. The release will mark the 47th Vault package from his record label and will be available to those who subscribe by January 31st. A preview of the album is available now with a live cut of “Missing Pieces”.

The 38-track concert clocks in at nearly three-and-a-half hours. Over the course of the evening, White ran through memorable White Stripes tracks like the opening “Fell in Love With a Girl” as well as “The Big Three Killed My Baby”, “Icky Thump”, “We’re Going To Be Friends”, and more. The show also finds White offering up covers of Beck‘s “Devil’s Haircut”, Led Zeppelin‘s “The Lemon Song”, and Hank Williams‘ “Ramblin’ Man”.

The four, 180-gram LPs come in White’s signature solo colours of blue, black, and white. Together they are housed in a slipcase cover with photo inner sleeves, featuring pictures from the show shot by David Swanson. Along with Live at Masonic Temple, subscribers will also receive a 7′ vinyl of White’s appearance on Saturday Night Live on October 10th where he performed a medley comprised of “Ball and Biscuit”, “Don’t Hurt Yourself”, and “Jesus Is Coming Soon” as well as paid tribute to Eddie Van Halen with his performance of “Lazaretto” using a guitar modeled after Eddie’s.

Ahead of the Vault package’s release, White has also shared live audio of “Missing Pieces” from the concert, available below. 

“Live at Masonic Temple” and subscribe to Third Man Records‘ Vault series by January 31st to receive the vinyl.

The White Stripes Greatest Hits

In 1997 a brother and sister climbed into the third floor attic of their Southwest Detroit family homestead and bashed out a primitive cover of David Bowie’s “Moonage Daydream.” In an alternate reality, it’s all they ever do musically. The brother leads a spartan life as a dutiful upholsterer and the sister finishes culinary school and continues to make heart warming food.

But that doesn’t happen. Something sparks in both of them. They take their simple guitar-drums-voice approach to a local open mic night on Bastille Day. The performance was just good enough to keep them going. In what feels like a whirlwind, they record and release two 7-inch singles for a local indie label. A not-so-local indie offers to put out a full length album.

They start touring. Another album. More touring. Another album. Folks Really start to pay attention. Crazy touring schdeule’s. More albums, accolades, wildest dream after wildest dream coming true. “World-renowned” becomes an appropriate descriptor as does “long-building overnight sensation.”

The fact that people even care about the Vault at all is almost entirely predicated on the hard work and dedication that the White Stripes exhibited from the very onset of their existence. So it is with extreme reverence that we pour that same dedication into The White Stripes Greatest Hits.

We get that the idea of “Greatest Hits” may seem irrelevant in the era of Spotify and playlisting…that an act’s most streamed songs are considered their de facto “hits.” But we also wholeheartedly believe that great bands deserve “Greatest Hits” and that a large part of our successes has been built on zigging when the rest of the “music business” is zagging. The White Stripes are a great band with great fans and it feels like a greatest hits compilation from them is not only appropriate, but absolutely necessary.

With a track list traversing the entirety of their career, from late Nineties flashes of brilliance through early 2000s underground anthems, masterful MTV moon man moments, Grammy-grabbing greatness, worldwide stadium chants…the songs here are as wide-ranging as you can imagine. Two LP’s worth of those tracks are precision pressed on glorious red and white discs at Third Man Pressing in Detroit.

The White Stripes Greatest Hits detonation vinyl

But for our most dedicated supporters, the legion, the ride-or-die Vault members…well, you deserve a bit more

We expanded the collection by adding a bonus LP of largely overlooked, previously scattered b-sides. That disc is pressed on an exquisite red/white/black “detonation” coloured vinyl. Of particular interest is the first-ever official vinyl appearance of the Stripes’ stellar cover of the Tegan and Sara track “Walking With a Ghost” coupled with the first vinyl issue of some tracks in over 15 years.

To climb further down the rabbit hole, the Vault version of Greatest Hits features iconic artwork from longtime White Stripes collaborator Rob Jones. Fully displaying why he’s a Grammy Award-winning designer, the Jones artwork is whimsical and engrossing and chock full of Easter eggs that will only slowly avail themselves to the most scrutinous of eyes over the long arduous passage of time.

In addition to the exclusive album art, the Vault package comes with a shockingly breath-taking custom set of three Rob Jones 8×10 silk-screen prints. There are three different sets of prints and they will be inserted into your package at random. Frameable, gallery-worthy, dare we say investible…nothing short of the brilliance that’s become par for the course from Mr. Jones.

As the final little treat for this our 46th Vault package, we’ve got a White Stripes-themed set of magnetic poetry. Yes, all the words you best know from Jack White’s lyrics…home, bone and telephone and SO many more, included here for you to randomize and make your own “little” White Stripes song. While the standard issue black vinyl version of The White Stripes Greatest Hits will be available for eternity, the Vault version will be the ONLY coloured-vinyl or artwork variation. Sign up for the Vault by midnight Central Standard Time October 31st to lock in what is truly a stunning collection celebrating the best recorded moments of the White Stripes.

We have a live single coming out on Third Man Records on October 30th, Last year on Halloween, we played TMR in Nashville and our set was recorded straight to vinyl. you can now hear it for yourself & feel like You were there. (Side A- Lizzy / Side B- Bet my Brains)⁣ features two tracks from “Devour You”. Our first ever live recording. on a cold, cold night last Halloween, Los Angeles’s Angel baby rocker phenoms Starcrawler blasted off in the Blue Room at Third Man Nashville, igniting the stage and pumping the lifeblood back into the room. Formed in 2015 not yet out of high school, the group has released two full-length albums, both to critical acclaim, and toured extensively across the globe. Starcrawler dressed the part for this special night in the Blue Room, fully and appropriately costumed up for maximum spookiness. this live 7” single captures the group ripping through two songs from their most recent album “Devour You”.

First is their vicious, nearly double-time version of “Lizzy,” tumbling through swells of mic feedback, fills and riffy distortion as vocalist Arrow De Wilde shouts into the ruckus. on the flipside, “Bet My Brains” (whose 7” label prominently features a rare appearance from one of the more sheepish members of the band) is head-banging, chugging R’n’R fun incarnate. A must listen!, We are also extremely excited to say that we’re playing a special livestream show October 30th at @theroxy,

Live at Goose Lake: August 8th 1970 (Standard Black Vinyl)

The Stooges are releasing a previously-unheard, “high-quality soundboard recording” of their original lineup’s final performance, which was recorded on August 8th, 1970, shortly before the release of their classic sophomore album Fun House, which they performed in full at this show. The new live album is called The Stooges’ Live At Goose Lake: August 8, 1970, and it comes out almost exactly 50 years after the show was performed, August 7th via Third Man Records.

The audio was “lovingly restored” by Vance Powell (The White Stripes, Chris Stapleton) and mastered by Bill Skibbe at Third Man Mastering, and the liner notes were written by Jaan Uhelzski (Creem Magazine). There’s a Rough Trade limited-edition colored vinyl variant with purple-colored vinyl and a standard LP jacket, and an indie exclusive version on cream-colored vinyl with a purple-colored vinyl and a standard LP jacket, and an indie exclusive version on cream-colored vinyl with a screen-printed LP jacket.

A press release reads:

The apocryphal tale of the Stooges performance at the Goose Lake Festival has been told countless times over the past five decades. Bassist Dave Alexander, due to nerves or overindulgence or whatever you choose to fill in the blank, absolutely spaces in front of 200,000 attendees. He does not play a single note on stage. He is summarily fired by Iggy Pop immediately following the gig. Here starts the beginning of the end of the Stooges.

But what if that simply… wasn’t the case? What if you could prove otherwise? Well, it’d be the
proto-punk equivalent of having an immediate, on-the-scene, man on the street report of all those folkies booing Dylan’s electric set at Newport in ‘65. Irrefutable evidence of what ACTUALLY went down. Found buried in the basement of a Michigan farmhouse amongst other tasty analog artifacts of the same era, the 1/4” stereo two-track tape of the Stooges complete performance at Goose Lake on August 8th, 1970 is the Rosetta Stone for fans of this seminal band.

Not only is this the last ever performance of the original godhead Stooges line-up, but it is the ONLY known soundboard recording of said line-up. Playing the entirety of their canonical 1970 masterpiece Fun House, the sound, the performance, everything about this record is revelatory.

Would you believe that… Alexander actually DID play bass on this occasion? Or that, despite grievous failures on some songs, Alexander is damn solid on others? Especially on the bass-led songs “Dirt” and “Fun House”? Does Iggy provoke the crowd to tear down festival barriers? Did the powers that be pull the plug on the Stooges? So many questions are answered only to have more arise.

Released to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the performance, Live at Goose Lake: August 8th 1970, is the rare release that literally rewrites the history of these Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees.

“T.V. Eye (Radio Edit)” (Live) 2020 Third Man Records,  Released on: 2020-06-10

 

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Brendan Benson is one of American’s best songwriters. Sure, he might not be the best-selling, but in terms of sheer melodies crafted, lyrics excelled, and wonderful songs released he’s up there with the greatest. Back in April, Brendan Benson unveiled his latest set of tracks away from The Raconteurs, with whom he serves as co-songwriter along with Jack White. Benson discussus his first solo LP in seven years, as well as the emerging live streaming industry in the wake of the then-novel coronavirus.

His last single ‘Half A Boy (And Half A Man)’ manages to shuffle reflective masculinity into a three minute country-tinged power pop song and make it work. Immaculately conceived, ‘Half A Boy…‘ is driven by acoustic guitar chords and crunching lead overdubs, but at heart its a gentle beast.

A tale of split personalities, Shot from Brendan Benson’s home studio in Nashville, TN.

Made this with my friend Brad from The Whirlwind Heat. Back in the day, I engineered their album “Do Rabbits Wonder”. Little known fact.  Dear Life is out now on Third Man Records.

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On June 15th, 2000, The White Stripes performed at Jay’s Upstairs in Missoula, MT, just five days before the release of De Stijl, the band’s second album. Today, June 20th, 2020, “De Stijl” celebrates its 20th birthday, and though The White Stripes are no longer together, the band has released footage of “Death Letter” from that Jay’s Upstairs concert, which will also appear in the Third Man Records Vault Package #44.

The 2000 Son House cover came before frontman Jack White would add a Big Muff to his pedalboard, and well ahead of its emergence as a fan-favorite live track, way back in the days of $1.25 pints of Pabst and Hi8 camcorders. This rendition of “Death Letter” featured Jack’s high-pitched vocals, percussive guitar picking, and Meg White‘s steady drumming, typical of the band’s minimalist garage rock and blues sound at the time. While not as extensive as later versions, which usually include an improvised intro and some segues, Jack took the solo to familiar places thanks to his trusty DigiTech Whammy pedal and high-gain tone.

Though the band had only been together for a couple of years at this point, Jack and Meg’s chemistry is palpable. A simple glance or an audible “Hey!” from Jack signals the changes, which sees Meg follow in lockstep. The crowd seems entranced throughout the grainy video too, and while there are not many people at the tiny venue, it certainly foreshadows the arenas that followed in later years.

In celebration of the 20th Anniversary of De Stijl, watch The White Stripes (Jack White & Meg White) perform “Death Letter” live at Jay’s Upstairs in Missoula, MT from June 15th, 2000! This performance took place during the peak of De Stijl touring, and was taken directly from the original tapes deep within the Third Man Records archives for the 20th anniversary of De Stijl Third Man Vault Package.

De Stijl, dutch for “the style”, is the second album released by The White Stripes on June 20th, 2000. Head to the Third Man Records website for more information on future vault releases.

After a near 11-year long period the The Fiery Furnaces came back on Thursday with the new single “Down at the So and So on Somewhere,” courtesy of Third Man Records. The last we heard from the brother/sister duo of Eleanor and Matthew Friedberger was 2009’sI’m Going Away, released in November of that year. “Down at the So and So on Somewhere” is being released as a 7-inch vinyl by Third Man. The songs were recorded in New York City and a few hours north of New York City on February 3rd and February 10th – 12th, 2020,” the band collectively say in a press release. “‘Down at the So and So on Somewhere’ is a regretful song about having regrets. Now it seems even more sad than we thought it was back then: ‘Will you meet me.’”

Starting off with a dark synth, midi-drums and a single piano note, the track nostalgically looks back at what could have been. The chorus then picks up with some brighter synth, additional keys and airy falsetto wondering: “Don’t you remember we were happy then?/Can you remember we’re right now?”  Bittersweet and gorgeous, fits perfectly among the poppier tracks they’ve done before while having a hidden melancholic edge.

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The 7-inch includes the additional track “The Fortune Teller’s Revenge” on the B-side. A portion of proceeds will also be donated to Black Lives Matter and AACM Chicago, the duo’s hometown city.
The Fiery Furnaces were scheduled to perform at this year’s Pitchfork Music Festival, which was unfortunately cancelled due to the coronavirus. In the last decade the duo has released eight solo albums collectively .Released June 18, 2020 Producers: Eleanor Friedberger, Matthew Friedberger

discogs-indie-label-dig

Online music marketplace Discogs has just launched the Discogs Daily Dig, an initiative to support indie record labels during the coronavirus pandemic. Each day they will focus on a different indie label that will sell rarities, test pressings, out-of-print releases, and back catalouge through Discogs. It started today (5/5) with Numero Group and here’s the first week’s schedule:

  • Tuesday, May 5 – Numero Group
  • Wednesday, May 6 – Captured Tracks
  • Thursday, May 7 – Burger Records
  • Friday, May 8 – Trouble In Mind
  • Saturday, May 9 – Stones Throw
  • Sunday, May 10 – Drag City
  • Monday, May 11 – Third Man Records

Dear Life

“There’s something about this record,” Benson says, describing his Third Man Records debut album “Dear Life”. “A friend of mine called it ‘life-affirming.’ I thought it was a joke at first but then realized, well, it’s about life and death for sure. I don’t know if that’s positive or optimistic or whatever, but that’s what’s going on with me.”

Brendan Benson finds himself in an enviable spot as he enters the third decade of a remarkably creative, consistently idiosyncratic career – an accomplished frontman, musician, songwriter, producer, band member, husband, and dad. Benson’s seventh solo album, and first new LP in almost seven years, “Dear Life” is this consummate polymath’s most inventive and upbeat work thus far, an 11- track song cycle about life,  love, family, fatherhood, and the pure joy of making music.

Produced and almost entirely performed by Benson at his own Readymade Studio in Nashville, the album sees the Michigan-born, Nashville-based artist – and co-founder, with Jack White, of The Raconteurs – reveling in a more modernist approach than ever before, fueled by a heady brew of cannabis, hip-hop, and a newly discovered interest in software drum programming.

The result is an untapped playfulness that elevates expertly crafted songs like the opener, “I Can If You Want Me To,” and the first  single, “Good To Be Alive,” with voluble arrangements, elastic grooves, and incandescent power. Imbued with revitalized ambition and confidence, DEAR LIFE is Brendan Benson at his very best.

A more-fitting sentiment we cannot conjure and is the perfect stage banter quote from Jack White to introduce the triple-LP live recording culling the best of the best from the Raconteurs recent three night stand at the legendary Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa, Oklahoma from October 2019.

As the Raconteurs are allegedly the first band to ever sell out three consecutive shows at Cain’s Ballroom, it was only fitting to mark the occasion by recording each night, culling only the best of each of those performances, and fusing them together for a career-spanning, masterwork of an album.

Highlighting recent entries in their catalog like the infectious “Help Me Stranger” and the whirling “Bored and Razed” while paying deference to momentous sing-alongs like “Carolina Drama” and “Steady, As She Goes” to absolutely mind-bending, room-levitating blues expression via “Blue Veins” and even then you’re only just scratching the surface.

Captured at the pinnacle of the band’s touring behind their chart topping album Help Us Stranger, the electrifying live performances place a raw, unbound energy behind the entire breadth of the band’s catalog, including gems from their 2008 LP Consolers of the Lonely and their 2006 debut Broken Boy Soldiers.

Housed in a magnificent tri-fold jacket and appropriating the Matthew Jacobson-designed artwork which highlights the Art Deco frieze of the Tulsa Fire Alarm building (which was used for the three Cain’s concert posters) and pressed on vibrant copper, green and black colored vinyl…the whole shebang is truly something to behold.

The fitting companion piece to this explosive 3xLP is the intimate performance of Raconteurs’ dual frontmen Brendan Benson and Jack White performing as a duo on July 9th 2019.

Shot at Third Man Records Cass Corridor storefront on White’s 44th birthday, the jam-packed room still only fitting 300 attendees, Brendan and Jack laid out sparse, explorative takes on not only Raconteurs songs, but other classics from their expansive back catalogs. Performances of Raconteurs faves like “Only Child” and “Now That You’re Gone” sound unlike any other version before or since, while the vibe propelling songs like the White Stripes “Sugar Never Tasted So Good” or Benson’s “Metarie” are reminiscent of times back when these two guys would just goof around in Detroit dive bars while a handful of uninterested patrons pretended to not be bothered by their racket.

About that…as a bonus to the mutli-camera, HD, Blu-Ray, 4k, 16-channel audio with super crystal clear capture of the above-mentioned performance, it felt fitting to tack on the ultra lo-fi, camcorder and condenser microphone capture of the first-ever performance of Jack White and Brendan Benson together. Playing for free at the Garden Bowl Lounge in Detroit on March 14th, 1999, the gig shows the two as if without a care in the world, having a blast and rolling through songs of which only TWO had been released by that point. An intimate, charming artifact of a simpler time.

And for the record, Pink Floyd’s “Fearless” was performed at BOTH of these shows, twenty years apart but no less magnificent.