Posts Tagged ‘Father/Daughter Records’

Adam Schlesinger was a prodigious and prolific songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist. He died on April 1 at the age of 52 as the result of complications from COVID-19. Not only was Schlesinger in multiple beloved bands—including the power-pop-leaning Fountains of Wayne and sophisticated electro-pop act Ivy—but he also collaborated on songs for movie soundtracks and the TV show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

A wide array of artists touched by Schlesinger’s life pay tribute to the many musical projects of which he was a part via the Bandcamp-exclusive benefit compilation, Saving for a Custom Van. The 31-song collection features collaborators, tourmates, friends, and fans putting their own spin on songs spanning his entire career. Saving for a Custom Van, which takes its title from a lyric in Fountains of Wayne’s “Utopia Parkway,” is co-curated and co-released by Father/Daughter Records and Wax Nine.

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One-hundred percent of Saving for a Custom Van proceeds will be donated to MusiCares’ COVID-19 Relief Fund, which is dedicated to helping music industry and community members affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Released June 16th, 2020

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Austin, Texas-based songwriter Christelle Bofale will be the first to tell you the importance of family roots and mental health, considering how much those things aided her own self-discovery. Being the first American born in her family, the rich heritage of the Congo is deeply rooted in her upbringing and relationship with sounds.From singing and dancing with her mother as a child, to praying to Congolese music with her grandmother, to her father, a soukous guitar player and musical director for the Congregation at his church, Bofale’s journey as a musician has been defined in tiny intervals throughout the course of her life. As a songwriter, she infuses hints of the Congo into various aspects of her music, bridging the musical influences of the diaspora with juxtaposed elements of indie rock, soul and jazz respectively.

Christelle Bofale grew up steeped in the music of her Congolese parents — influences that only deepen the languid textures of her lush, jazzy, deliberately paced folk songs. Bofale’s Swim Team EP unfurls gracefully, revealing a thoughtful set of ruminations on addressing mental health, moving past awful moments and clinging to sources of solace in a world that seems to be spinning out of control.

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released February 20th, 2020

Written by Christelle Miller
Guitar + Vocals: Christelle Miller
Bass + Keys: Jake Miles

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On her debut album Alone at Last, Tasha celebrates the radical political act of being exquisitely gentle with yourself. For years, the Chicago songwriter has dreamed hard of a better world—she’s worked with the local racial justice organization Black Youth Project 100 and has been on the front lines at protests around the city. But as she returned to the guitar, an instrument her mother first taught her to play when she was 15 years old, she began exploring the ways music can be a powerful force for healing. It might not fix a deeply broken world all by itself, but it can offer comfort and respite for those who, like her, dare to imagine a thriving future.

Citing Robin D. G. Kelley’s book Freedom Dreams as a foundational text to her artistic practice, she says, “Black folks’ imagination inherently is a radical thing. In a place of oppression and colonization, the ability to imagine a future, imagine magic, imagine something better, is subversive. People don’t want you to be able to imagine yourself outside of the place that you’ve been put.” So she started asking: “What does my imagination mean tome as a radical thing?” Because Tasha’s music has served her so profoundly as she’s made it, she hopes it can be a source of strength for others, too. “I’m only able to handle the world because I can write these songs,” she says, “so I’d like to think that I help other people deal with the world for the same reason.”

Across Alone at Last’s seven tracks, Tasha sings mantras of hope and restoration over lush guitar lines inspired by the stylings of Nai Palm and Lianne La Havas—both artists who, like Tasha, opt for a sweetness in their playing over the masculinized bravado that often accompanies the electric guitar. “You/Take care of your little body,” Tasha urges on the record’s spoken word opener. On “Kind of Love,” she paints falling for someone as the gateway to a new world where anything’s possible, and on “Something About This Girl,” she notes the profound strength that comes from vulnerability: “All her softness make her tough.”

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“These songs are bed songs,” Tasha says of Alone at Last. “Songs about the place that one might go when they finally need to be away from whatever it is that might be causing them stress or anxiety or sadness or fear.” In the world she conjures within the album, there’s plenty of room to forge your own home where you can rejuvenate and heal—where you don’t have to be a superhero and you don’t have to save the world all by yourself, where nothing is expected of you except that you just be. It’s the kind of album you can curl into after a hot summer day in the city: a powerful talisman in a demanding world, and a reminder that kindness toward the self can help unlock the way to a world a little more livable than this one.

Released October 26th, 2018

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Do You Wonder About Me? Is the follow-up to 2017’s Swear I’m Good At This. The new record marks a more intentional, self-assured Diet Cig; not only in Luciano’s radically intimate, acerbic lyrics, but in the duo’s sound as well. Luciano and Bowman moved to Richmond, VA in the summer of 2017 as a place to “hide out and make music,” and it was there that they wrote Do You Wonder About Me?, Diet Cig’s ode to growing up.

“We spent a lot of time after the first record growing as people, being humans outside of tour for a little bit, and trying to shed the imposter syndrome.” Luciano says. Spending the time to make the kind of music they really wanted to make and making sure they felt good about it was crucial to the success of tracks like Night Terrors. It’s a slower-paced song than Diet Cig’s usual, but just as biting; a song about reckoning with all the past versions of yourself. As Luciano puts it, “Am I still these people, or have I shapeshifted?” It’s essentially the thesis of Do You Wonder About Me?, considering and accepting the embarrassing aspects of your identity, and how they’re just as much a part of you as the good stuff.

Our second album, “Do You Wonder About Me?” is coming out May 1st! Pre-order the record (https://orcd.co/dietcigwonder) and check out our new song, “Thriving.” Thriving was the first song we wrote for this record!!! Inspired by the melodrama of reality TV and musical theater, we wanted the song to bounce back and forth between a lavish personal anthem and the anguish of feeling forever beholden to others opinions.

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Releases May 1st, 2020

All songs written by Alex Luciano and Noah Bowman

Band Members
Alex Luciano-vox/guitar
Noah Bowman-drums
Jamal Ruhe played all the bass
Karli Ashlyn Helm sang harmonies and additional vocals and played additional keys
Christopher Daly shredded the arpeggiator more than once
Travis de Jong played saxophone

Swim Team

Austin, Texas-based songwriter Christelle Bofale will be the first to tell you the importance of family roots and mental health, considering how much those things aided her own self-discovery. Being the first American born in her family, the rich heritage of the Congo is deeply rooted in her upbringing and relationship with sounds.From singing and dancing with her mother as a child, to praying to Congolese music with her grandmother, to her father, a soukous guitar player and musical director for the Congregation at his church, Bofale’s journey as a musician has been defined in tiny intervals throughout the course of her life. As a songwriter, she infuses hints of the Congo into various aspects of her music, bridging the musical influences of the diaspora with juxtaposed elements of indie rock, soul and jazz respectively.

Weightless guitar tangents and lush, aquatic soundscapes are a vital part of what embodies Swim Team, her debut EP that serves a powerful introduction to Bofale’s budding artistry. Somewhere between influences like Joni Mitchell and Alex G, Bofale has found a sweet spot for her sound that lives between both harsh and gentle terrain, achieving a relaxing, yet rugged tonality.Each track pictured on Swim Team is brushed vividly with colors that illuminate the fear of being honest and doing that much needed personal work. Bofale’s earnest and bravery is a snapshot of black mental health and the nuance it carries. Being real isn’t easy, but it’s crucial in cultivating spaces for healthy discussion and giving other black women like Bofale a platform to do the same.

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released May 31st, 2019

Written by Christelle Miller
Guitars – Christelle Miller, Jake Smith Drums- Billy Hickey, Bass- John Bergin

Lisa Prank is a true-blue romantic. In fact, “I’m very preoccupied with romance,” songwriter Robin Edwards admits. On her second full-length for Father/Daughter Records, Perfect Love Song, Edwards acknowledges the ultimate joke of love: that there is no perfect, so you’ll get tripped up while chasing it—but what else could possibly be more rich, more exhilarating, more everything, skinned knees be damned? Stitching together pop-punk panache and pillow talk introspection, Perfect Love Song finds Lisa Prank not in pursuit of the flawless impossible, as the title may suggest. Rather, she’s interested in the entire experience of love and learning through it. “I never learned how to get mad,” Edwards sings on the reflective “Get Mad”—but she did learn how to write totally gratifying pop songs about it. Perfect Love Song is an album that takes a soft-focus gaze at romance’s sharpest points and edges, both the exciting peaks and the scary cliffs.

As Edwards was navigating a drawn out, Lifetime-movie level heartbreak, she found herself drifting back towards the home she had in her friendships. She moved back into her old room in storied Seattle punk house, Spruce House, sharing a door with Tacocat’s Bree McKenna (who’s also her bandmate, along with Julia Shapiro, in the supergroup Who Is She?). She’d knock and ask McKenna for feedback on songs, who wound up playing bass on the record. To produce, Edwards tapped close friend and indie pop legend Rose Melberg of Tiger Trap, The Softies, and Go Sailor. Melberg’s artistic alignment and personal closeness to Edwards gave her near psychic insight into Lisa Prank’s sonic goals, but at enough remove to provide breakthroughs to Edwards at stuck points (Melberg also co-wrote “Telescope,” and sang harmonies on several tracks). It was a collaboration that felt like coaching, leading her achieve her ideal polished-punk sound, alongside Ian LeSage who engineered and mixed the record at the Vault Studios. Recording was fun, too. Friends were around, creating the kind of lighthearted, mutually supportive feeling one needs surrounding them feel like themselves again after retrieving their heart back from a breakup. Lisa Prank’s last record, Adult Teen, used a Roland MC-505 drum machine, for Perfect Love Song, she traded it in for real life drummer, Tom Fitzgibbon.

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Writing Perfect Love Song was Edwards’ opportunity “to personally say all the things that I wanted to say, or wish I had said.” In “Scream the Truth,” a gaslighting extinguisher anthem about reclaiming your sanity, she gets to be mad on her terms: “I wasn’t losing my mind,” she sings. Says Edwards, “it’s about being frustrated seeing someone else navigate the world as a very surface-level nice person who is performatively feminist and social-justice minded, but knowing the truth of how they treat people in their personal life.” The opening track, “Rodeo,” likens the searing, sinking-in feeling of a post-fight realization—“‘cause ‘I don’t wanna be in love’/means I don’t wanna be in love/with you”—to the dangers and desires of the spectacle of love. “By now I know/this is the rodeo I chose,” she sings, electing to get back on her horse and ride, acknowledging the pain that’s part of that game.

“I wish a different emotion was so alive and exciting to me,” Edwards laughs, “but love is just the one that feels so visceral and consuming.” Perfect Love Song explodes the roller coaster snapshots of romance in bursts of poppy neon bright color, with Edwards’ cheeky perspective polished to full pop-punk shine. And the mission of that genre, one could argue, is to keep on bopping along through the bullshit of life. To stay buoyant, to find fun in the big what-ifs and whatevers. It what keeps the dream Lisa Prank afloat: as she sings on “Constellations,” “still I keep on hoping this is some perfect love song/and we’ll go on and on and on, and on and on, and on.”

released October 4th, 2019

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We are big fans of Country singers with the surname Rose, and this week we were delighted to find it wasn’t just Caitlin we had to be excited about. Hailing from New Orleans, Esther Rose, no relation as far as we know, has actually been quietly gaining fans since the release of her 2017 record, “This Time Last Night”, which Jack White liked so much he invited Esther to come and sing with him on his Boarding House Reach album. This week, Esther has not only shared a brand new single, “Handyman”, but also confirmed her upcoming release of the second album, “You Made It This Far”, out in August on Father/Daughter Records.

Listening to Handyman, what instantly grabbed us was the integrity of it all; there’s a purity to both the unpolished playing and the effortless, dripping emotion of the vocal delivery. We’re put in mind of the first time we heard Hurray For The Riff Raff; the way from barely a single phrase we wanted to know everything about the person singing it, sometimes a song just grabs you, just demands your uninterrupted attention, Handyman does just that. There’s a winning simplicity to the instrumentation; the gentle drive of a snare drum, the meandering weave of the fiddle, the minimal pulse of upright bass, all serve to give a platform to Esther’s tale of an affection still burning, despite the quiet questioning, “I hope you change your mind, won’t you try?” Timeless, beautiful, and quite, quite brilliant, we might just have found our new favourite songwriter.

You Made It This Far is out August 23rd via Father/Daughter Records. 

Larissa Sapko had set two goals for herself in the summer of 2013: find a job, and start a band. Once she got a job, the band wasn’t far behind. She asked her friend Kian Sorouri if he would like to play guitar (he did), and he in turn asked Jim Dobrowolski if he would like to play drums (he learned how, and he did). What It Is came out in December 2013, and Loose Tooth enjoyed a year of playing local shows and weekenders in the Northeast.

After hearing that Jimmy was moving to Costa Rica, Christian Bach and Kyle Laganella stepped forward and volunteered their shredding skills to keep Loose Tooth moving up and onward. After reworking their first EP What It Is and writing some new songs in the process, the band’s debut record Easy Easy East was ready to rip.

After touring on Easy Easy East throughout 2015, the band came together to start writing their follow up record Big Day. The songs on Big Day developed a more cohesive feeling as the four became more comfortable playing together. Big Day is set to be released in April of 2017 on Father/Daughter Records and Lame-O Records.

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Big Day comes out April 7th on Lame-O Records and Father/Daughter Records.
released March 15th, 2017

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Time for some girl talk. Moaning Lisa’s breakthrough single is, by their own admission and design, a very lesbian affair. It’s celebrity crushes and heart-eyes-emoji lust, as backed by a slinking bass-line and a big-business riff. They cut to the point, and will wash you right out of their hair if you disagree. Even if you’re not – as 10 Thing I Hate About You put it – a k.d. lang fan, there’s so much to enjoy here that it doesn’t even matter. If you can appreciate a tongue-in-cheek indie-rocker with an attitude to it, you can get behind “Carrie.”

Official Video for ‘Carrie (I Want A Girl) released by Moaning Lisa on January 19th, 2018. Don’t be alarmed, it’s not a dodgy internet connection – this video is intentionally lo-fi. .

Moaning Lisa’s second EP, Do You Know Enough?, is the audio equivalent of four seasons in one day. When “Lily” rolls around, the storm is settling in and things are taking a turn for the worse. A considerable stylistic departure for the Canberra natives, “Lily” is a slow-motion lucid dream in which a private universe crumbles and drifts into the abyss. Anchored by picked-out bass and beds of guitar feedback, the song subtly sweeps and builds to what may be the single most devastating lyric of the year: “Now I have nothing left for you to take.” Welcome to heartbreak.

Band Members
Charlie – vox/bass/guitar
Hayley – guitar/bass/vox
Ellen – lead guitar
Hayden – drums

‘Lily’ is taken from Moaning Lisa’s sophomore EP, ‘Do You Know Enough?’ out now on Hysterical Records (AU) and Father/Daughter Records (US).

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Sir Babygirl’s Kelsie Hogue has turned your most disastrous nights into a catchy, carnival-esque nightmare.

“The most insidious thing about self-destruction is how hard it is to spot,” she says. “It’s quite a shape shifter. With this album, I wanted to face my self-sabotaging tendencies head-on in hopes of exorcising them.”

In the “Haunted House” video — directed by Eli Raskin with choreography by Ashley “Robi” Robicheaux — Hogue jerks her body like a marionette’s, scribbling in her diary and hitting high note after high note with the frenzy of someone who’s belted hours of karaoke hits into her hairbrush.

“We wanted the set to reflect the idea of being trapped in your own trauma, with no perception of the outside world,” Hogue says. A self-described theater kid, Hogue crafted Sir Babygirl as a project in which everything — celebration, self-sabotage, healing — is part of the performance. There may be trauma to work through, but Sir Babygirl is an agent of catharsis: an inner world in which Hogue plays all the parts, in which a role only has power if you choose to play it.

Sir Babygirl’s debut album “Crush on Me” comes out February. 15th via Father/Daughter Records