Posts Tagged ‘Austin’

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The 13th Floor Elevators were a band from Austin, Texas, formed by guitarist and vocalist Roky Erickson, electric jug player Tommy Hall, and guitarist Stacy Sutherland. The band was together from 1965 to 1969,

As garage rock turned psychedelic by the latter half of the ’60s, “You’re Gonna Miss Me” was a significant milestone along the way. First released in January 1966, the song showcases Roky Erickson’s otherworldly shriek and Tommy Hall’s eerie electric jug. Hailing from Austin, Texas, 13th Floor Elevators managed four albums and seven singles in their brief run from 1965-69 (and Erickson went on to subsequent acclaim and notoriety), but “You’re Gonna Miss Me” remains the group’s defining statement.

The 2005 documentary You’re Gonna Miss Me specifically credits Tommy Hall with coining the term “psychedelic rock”, although artists such as the Holy Modal Rounders and the Deep had described their music as “psychedelic” earlier. Their contemporary influence has been acknowledged by many of todays musicians.

As garage rock turned psychedelic by the latter half of the ’60s, “You’re Gonna Miss Me” was a significant milestone along the way. First released in January 1966, the song showcases Roky Erickson’s otherworldly shriek and Tommy Hall’s eerie electric jug. Hailing from Austin, Texas, 13th Floor Elevators managed four albums and seven singles in their brief run from 1965-69 (and Erickson went on to subsequent acclaim and notoriety), but “You’re Gonna Miss Me” remains the group’s defining statement.

Original LP Mono Mix version (1966). By the psychedelic rock band “13th Floor Elevators”.

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Before he played at The Queen Elizabeth Theatre on December 12th, Shakey Graves performed a session for the PEAK Lounge You can listen to the exclusive acoustic performance in concert with Mill Street Brewery.

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Shakey Graves Is A Gentleman From Texas.

Live session from 102.7 THE PEAK Vancouver || http://www.thepeak.fm
released February 8th, 2019

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Small Houses is a Austin, TX based indie/folk project featuring the songs and poems of Flint, MI native Jeremy Quentin. Artfully crafted finger-style guitar playing, and softly sung melodies describing the people, love, and homes of Quentin’s life. A long time favourite Small Houses aka singer-songwriter Jeremy Quentin is getting ready to release a new album “I Don’t Know What’s Safe” in January 2019. The magnificent lead single I Remember Me surfaced earlier this week with a gorgeous music video. Watch the video that was directed by Phillip Harder below and grap a name-your-price download of the single from his Bandcamp.

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Released February 8th, 2019

Small Houses is a Austin, TX based indie/folk project featuring the songs and poems of Flint, MI native Jeremy Quentin. Artfully crafted finger-style guitar playing, and softly sung melodies describing the people, love, and homes of Quentin’s life. Tortured lyrics whip and wind their way around each other. They only let you see the knots and the grit, but something throbs inside there.

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Jeremy Quentin – Guitar, Vocals
David Ramirez – Bass
Carson Mchone – Vocals
Simon Page – Pedal Steel
Sam Kossler – Vocals

Released January 11th, 2019
Written By: Jeremy Quentin 

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Austin psych-blues four-piece White Denim released their last album, Performance, less than a year ago, and they’re already dropping singles off their new one. ‘Shanalala’ is one of two new tracks they just debuted in the lead up to the release of their eighth album in 11 years, titled Side Effects. There are no words to express how lazy this paragraph makes me feel.

Taken from the new album ‘Side Effects’, out March 29th

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The sound of Caroline Sallee’s music seems to be rooted in whimsy. Yet, for Sallee, who makes music with her band as Caroline Says, making her sophomore record No Fool Like an Old Fool was no light-hearted task. She recorded much of the album in her dingy basement apartment, dodging noisy upstairs neighbors and simultaneously working three jobs. It’s miraculous, then, that No Fool should feel so bright and light, despite the circumstances and often dark subject matter. Before writing the record, the Austin-based musician returned to her hometown of Huntsville, Ala. only to discover a frustrating sense of complacency among its residents, which inspired much of this album, according to Caroline Says’ bandcamp page. The lo-fi digital folk is destined to exist both in the nether regions of bandcamp, plattered for solo listening, and on portable speakers, to be played at sunny picnics and outdoor respites. Album standout “Sweet Home Alabama” marries ’50s doo wop to enchanting folk, all while delivering a dark storyline about what happens when your hometown isn’t your home anymore. “I used to love this town,” she sings. “What has it done for me / except lead me around?” On “Mea Culpa,” Sallee ushers in breezy vibes à la She & Him’s soul-inspired surf and implements clever wordplay, singing, “I’m like a stream that’s conflicted but can’t split in two.” While No Fool Like an Old Fool is slightly less purist-folk than her 2017 debut 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can’t Be Wrong, it’s still a broad display of Sallee’s acoustic leanings, especially on the haunting “First Song.” Like with lots of great folk music, Caroline Sallee’s creeps forward and flirts with fairytale, leaving you both with a grim sense of what’s real and a fresh breath of warm, bare-bones compositions.

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released March 16, 2018

Written, Performed, and Recorded by: Caroline Sallee

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The latest release by Austin label Keeled Scales, Years is the debut album from fellow Austin residents Sun June. The band was formed by founding members Laura Colwell and Stephen Salisbury when they were working in Terrence Malick’s editing rooms, and even practised in the office when Malick was away. Now they’ve added Michael Bain (guitar), Sarah Schultz (drums), and Justin Harris (bass) to become the quintet that is Sun June.

Years is a record shaped and propelled by the gentle forces of the world, The album opens with the swaying slo-mo folk rock song ‘Discotheque’, Colwell showing off her impressive vocals with a kind of husky and effortless passion. The track conjures gentle winds that swirl in plaintive yearning, lifting memories and images and twisting them into a full nostalgic picture with the slow rhythm of nature. ‘Slow Rise II’ is equally patient, beginning with snake-like guitar and a kind of wary soul-bearing. “Go ahead and look me in the eye,” Colwell sings, “tell me everything will be alright, oh I’m lonely too.” It’s a moment of unguarded honesty that closes distances, and which lays the groundwork for the catharsis that comes later. The last minute of the song distils what has until then been encoded between the lines, infused with a golden energy as it whips up into a rousing finale, Colwell repeating the line “I’m coming home” with increasing fervour.

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Indeed, repetition forms a key part of Sun June’s sound on Years, a number of the tracks returning to a repeated phrase, cyclical patterns that rise in intensity like incantations, or else echo out into the fabric of the sound. ‘Young’ is an example of the former, a track we described previously as “staring back in time not to find answers or cast blame, but instead for the fleeting chance to warm your face on the now lost glow of past love.” After a restrained start, the song eventually kicks into a little eddy of motion, spurred by the catchy chorus, as though each cycle generates further motion.

Whispered and winey, ‘Johnson City’ features emotions fermented, made velvety with age, the taste haunting tongues beyond the moment, before ‘Homes’ presses forward with a sense of brooding intimacy that oozes and creeps. ‘Records’ is carried as if by a fresh spring breeze, with Colwell singing “I’ll try to love you right” and the rhythm possessing a warmth that goes halfway to fulfilling the promise. This warmth leaks through into ‘Apartments’, intensifying as the crispness is replaced by the humid heat of confused dreams, before ‘Baby Blue’ cools into an icy certainty. This is the darkest, most brooding track on the record, the drums tight and insistent, the vocals likewise, the track gathering momentum under its own motion, and though descending evenly from great height.

Released June 15th, 2018

Laura Colwell, Michael Bain, Justin Harris, Stephen Salisbury, Sarah Schultz

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Molly Burch burst onto the music scene in 2017 with her debut “Please Be Mine” a ten-track ode to unrequited romance written after studying Jazz Vocal Performance in Asheville, NC and earned immediate praise from critics for her smoky, effortless vocals and bleeding-heart lyrics. Following a year of touring all over North America, Europe and the UK alongside the likes of Ought, Alex Cameron, Grizzly Bear and Courtney Barnett amongst others, Burch then returned to Texas to decompress. Finding herself suddenly devoid of stimulation and with nothing but time on her hands, she began anew, bouncing ideas off her bandmate and boyfriend Dailey Toliver who contributed guitar parts and orches­tration suggestions – and, slowly, an album took shape; soon after, “First Flower” became real. A walk-through Burch’s most intimate thoughts her broken friendships, sibling relationships and overwhelming anxiety – First Flower is a bright, beautiful album peppered with moments of triumph with Burch’s voice as strong and dexterous as ever. First Flower is a shapely sonic stage to let Burch shine on. The composi­tion and production carefully constructed to compliment and not over power.

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I love this album. It feels more opened up and energetic from the fantastic debut album “Please Be Mine”. Molly’s voice is a treat.

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Austin-based dream-rock band Moving Panoramas have shared “Baby Blues,” the first single from their forthcoming sophomore album In Two, out February. 22nd, 2019, via Modern Outsider. The track is a breezy, summery jam, made all the more light and airy by its carefree video. Directed by singer Leslie Sisson, the video finds the band prank-warring by sea and by land. The group seem enamored by the concept of “two”—it’s in the name of their album, which is their second, with a release date of 2/22—and “Baby Blues” seems to present the motif as a symbol of both progress and stasis. Moving Panoramas have had some lineup changes, and while Sisson’s dreamy vocals and the propellant jams of their previous work are still the focus, the subject matter seems to be oriented toward how certain things change, and how certain things stay the same. “Here we are / another year / same time, same spot,” Sisson sings.