Posts Tagged ‘Esther Rose’

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You can think of Esther Rose’s warm, hopeful country songs like points on a map. The New Orleans singer-songwriter takes pleasure in guiding you through colourful landmarks—especially those throughout her hometown—but she also makes time for smaller, quieter spots: say, the bar where a relationship turned sour, or the dreary high school where she and her sister begrudgingly drove each morning. Recorded direct-to-tape and accentuated with lap steel and fiddle, her songs pull you in like this; she wants you to see the scenery, learn the history, and feel at home before she sends you on your way.

With her two solo records—2017’s This Time Last Night (Mashed Potato) and 2019’s You Made It This Far (Father/Daughter)—Esther Rose is at the beginning of her own journey. Her vibrant, homespun music has earned comparisons to Hank Williams and Rilo Kiley, and, over the past year, she has toured with acts such as Nick Lowe & Los Straitjackets, The Cactus Blossoms, and Charley Crockett. Carving new ground while drawing on the tradition of classic folk music, she uses tender stories to depict deeper cosmic truths. As she sings, she invites you to a world that feels familiar, magical, and entirely her own.

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On her new EP, “My Favorite Mistakes”, Rose and her band cover a selection of downer anthems close to her heart. Recorded live over three days, it includes songs written by Sheryl Crow, Nick Lowe, Roy Orbison, and, of course, Hank Williams. “When I was starting out on my guitar playing/songwriting path,” Rose says, “I would listen to Hank Williams on my headphones and walk for miles and miles across town and back. Hank is one of the best teachers I’ve had when it comes to writing simply and directly, with humour and sincerity.” Through these performances, Rose sings not only in tribute to her heroes but also in deep, intimate conversation with them, traveling their lonesome highways to find her own new destinations.

Released May 29th, 2020

New Orleans–based singer-songwriter Esther Rose has released a cover of Sheryl Crow’s 1998 track “My Favorite Mistake.” The track was recorded live to live at New Orleans’ Tigermen Den.

“When people ask what kind of music I play I generally tell them ‘country & folk,’ but the truth is my band has a secret genre for my songwriting style which they call ‘’60s/’90s’; this weird blend of late-’60s folk and early-’90s alternative rock,” Rose said in a statement. “‘My Favorite Mistake’ somehow slides right into that comfort zone. My band and I had a lot of fun coming up with our own arrangement; Dan Cutler is playing that iconic guitar riff on upright bass, we slowed down the tempo, and I changed a couple words to make it a little more hopeful.”

Last year, Rose released her sophomore record, You Made It This Far, via Father/Daughter Records.

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Written by Sheryl Crow (BMI) and Jeff Trott (ASCAP)
Vocals: Esther Rose
Fiddle: Lyle Werner
Bass: Dan Cutler
Lap Steel: Matt Bell
Guitar & Vox: Max Bien-Kahn
Drums & Vox: Cameron Snyder

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We are big fans of Country singers with the surname Rose, and this week we were delighted to find it wasn’t just Caitlin we had to be excited about. Hailing from New Orleans, Esther Rose, no relation as far as we know, has actually been quietly gaining fans since the release of her 2017 record, “This Time Last Night”, which Jack White liked so much he invited Esther to come and sing with him on his Boarding House Reach album. This week, Esther has not only shared a brand new single, “Handyman”, but also confirmed her upcoming release of the second album, “You Made It This Far”, out in August on Father/Daughter Records.

Listening to Handyman, what instantly grabbed us was the integrity of it all; there’s a purity to both the unpolished playing and the effortless, dripping emotion of the vocal delivery. We’re put in mind of the first time we heard Hurray For The Riff Raff; the way from barely a single phrase we wanted to know everything about the person singing it, sometimes a song just grabs you, just demands your uninterrupted attention, Handyman does just that. There’s a winning simplicity to the instrumentation; the gentle drive of a snare drum, the meandering weave of the fiddle, the minimal pulse of upright bass, all serve to give a platform to Esther’s tale of an affection still burning, despite the quiet questioning, “I hope you change your mind, won’t you try?” Timeless, beautiful, and quite, quite brilliant, we might just have found our new favourite songwriter.

You Made It This Far is out August 23rd via Father/Daughter Records. 

“I’m always changing,” Esther Rose sings at the top of her sophomore album, “You Made It This Far”. The line is at once a promise and a plea, a concise distillation of her commitment to evolution as well as her dogged determination to meet every challenge in her path with unconditional acceptance. Laid-back yet deliberate, her delivery here marries old-school country and rural folk with a plainspoken philosophy that’s thoroughly modern, and the end result is a record that’s as joyful as it is restless, one that weaves fiddle and lap steel around profound revelations .

“There’s this theme of radical acceptance running through the whole album,” explains Rose, who recorded the album live to tape at Mashed Potato Records in New Orleans in just four days. “I didn’t realize it until after I’d finished writing the songs, but they all came from this place of trying to understand and truly accept myself and others in our most vulnerable moments of confusion or despair.”

A New Orleanian for the last decade, Rose first gained national prominence with the release of 2017’s This Time Last Night, an intoxicating debut, her “honest, gorgeous country songs” and rave that “her voice has a pitched-up June Carter quality, her melodies are simple like Jimmie Rodgers’s, and her tone is reminiscent of bluesy, lovelorn greats like Rex Griffin and Patsy Cline.” The record earned Rose many festival performances from Savannah Stopover to AmericanaFest alongside dates with The Punch Brothers, Pokey Lafarge, and The Deslondes, and it even caught the ear of fellow Detroit native Jack White, who was so taken with the music that he invited Rose to duet with him on his Boarding House Reach album and to share the stage for a live performance at Jazz Fest.

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While writing the songs that would become You Made It This Far, Rose found herself working through a period of tumultuous change, grappling with a breakup, a move, and a family illness all at once. Splitting her time between New Mexico and New Orleans, she pondered what it takes to love and to be loved, to be vulnerable enough to let someone in and brave enough to face the pain when they’re gone.