Posts Tagged ‘Various Artists’

Various 'Sad About The Times' 2xLP

Have you ever felt sad about the times you are living in? You may not always be able to work it out, but you can sprinkle a little sugar on your sadness with songs like these. A follow up collaboration between Mikey Young (Total Control / Eddy Suppression Ring) and Keith Abrahamsson (Head of A&R at Anthology Recordings) to their 2017 compilation “Follow The Sun, Sad About the Times”, at its core, is a set of North American 70s jammers.

With a hint (at times) of West Coast jangle, these tracks traverse the border between the power pop of the times and a late-night coke jam. You can also hear echoes of folk rock, soft rock, and even detect some psychedelic flashbacks. But despite the genre jumping, the atmosphere of Sad About The Times is always dominated by a haunted human voice.

These songs come in the wake of the psychedelic sixties; after the high-flying idealism had run its course and singer songwriters were ascendant. After the party, reality kicks in. They all could have been hits. Each with a different flavour, all subtly conveying universal emotions that are hard to describe but easy to feel. It features Jode, Hoover, Jim Spencer, Antonia Lamb, Hollins Ferry, Willow and more.

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The 50th anniversary of legendary music festival Woodstock is to be celebrated with what one can only describe as a quite exhaustive set of releases later this year. This summer marks the 50th anniversary of Woodstock, the defining event of a generation and one of the most iconic moments in popular music history. No one has ever attempted to document the historic festival as it unfolded in real time.

Between August 15th-18th, 1969, more than 400,000 people converged on Max Yasgur’s 600-acre dairy farm in upstate New York for Woodstock. 32 acts performed over the weekend including Joan Baez, The Band, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane, Santana, Sly and the Family Stone, and The Who.

Woodstock 50: Back To The Garden: The Anniversary Collection is available as a 3CD, 5LP, 10CD and a limited 38CD and blu-ray set! The 38CD experience has 432 songs, 267 of them previously unreleased, and features virtually every note played on the stage that weekend. As well as what they’re calling ‘sonic memorabilia’ such as stage announcements about brown acid, it being a ‘free concert from now on’ and – we’re presuming – any issues arising in the car park or people trying to locate their lost kids or minds (man).

The 10CD version features 162 tracks across and (along with the really big box) is the first Woodstock collection to feature live recordings of every performer at the festival. The vinyl version is a 42-track 5LP set with a 3CD edition mirroring this track listing.

The big 38CD edition is available from Rhino’s US site and also via the European store as well). It’s $800 in the USA and a bit over £600 over here. It looks like it’s direct-to-consumer (D2C) only.

Orders placed with Rhino for the big box will include exclusive Dale Saltzman 18×15 lithographs based on banners from the original festival. Think that’s probably enough? Oh no! Vinyl Me Please will have a special 10 LP package (due in early August) limited to 1,000 units pressed on tie-dyed-style coloured vinyl!  This set contains Woodstock Vols. 1, 2, 3 and 4, which haven’t been in print on vinyl since 2009.

The three-CD, ten-CD and 5LP vinyl editions of Woodstock: Back to the Garden – 50th Anniversary Experience are released 28 June 2019. The massive box will ship on 2 August.

The three-CD, ten-CD and 5LP vinyl editions of Woodstock: Back to the Garden – 50th Anniversary Experience are released 28th June 2019. The massive box will ship on 2nd August.

The Rock Machine Turns You On was the first bargain priced sampler album. It was released in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, The Netherlands, Germany and a number of other European countries in 1968 as part of an international marketing campaign by Columbia Records, who were known in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa as CBS.

A 1969 dated edition ( Number ASF 1356) bought in South Africa had a different sleeve (yellow with cut outs in the Rock Machine boxes) and psychedelic multicoloured vinyl. It also has a completely different track list with such notable tracks as Big Brother and the Holding Company’s ‘Piece of my Heart’ and Leonard Cohen’s ‘Suzanne’.

The Rock Machine marketing campaign was initiated in the US in January 1968, by Columbia Records under its president Clive Davis. The campaign was seen as a means of promoting its expanding roster of rock and folk rock acts, who included Bob Dylan, The Byrds, Simon and Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen, Moby Grape, Spirit, Taj Mahal, and Blood, Sweat and Tears. Early promotional material in Billboard magazine stated:

The Rock Machine...it’s the happening sounds of today. Out of it comes the biggest, hottest rock list that ever started off any month. And with our Columbia Rock Machine, the most exciting and meaningful merchandising campaign we’ve ever devised….. It’s all here – the talent, the product and the big concept to make it all happen. Now, doesn’t that turn you on?”

The design of the “Rock Machine” logo, used in subsequent publicity material, including album covers, was by Milton Glaser

As part of its highly successful campaign, CBS Records released The Rock Machine Turns You On, the first budget sampler LP,  in the UK in 1968. The album was priced at 14 shillings and 11 pence (£0.75), less than half the cost of a full priced LP at the time. It entered the UK Albums Chart in June 1969, several months after its first release, rising to no. 18, and was estimated to have sold over 140,000 copies. 

Side 1

  1. “I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight” – Bob Dylan – from the LP John Wesley Harding
  2. “Can’t Be So Bad” – Moby Grape – from the LP Wow
  3. “Fresh Garbage” – Spirit – from the LP Spirit
  4. “I Won’t Leave My Wooden Wife For You, Sugar” – The United States of America – from the LP The United States of America
  5. “Time of the Season” – The Zombies – from the LP Odessey and Oracle
  6. “Turn on a Friend” – The Peanut Butter Conspiracy – from the LP The Great Conspiracy
  7. “Sisters of Mercy” – Leonard Cohen – from the LP The Songs of Leonard Cohen

Side 2

  1. “My Days Are Numbered” – Blood, Sweat and Tears – from the LP Child Is Father to the Man
  2. “Dolphins Smile” – The Byrds – from the LP The Notorious Byrd Brothers
  3. “Scarborough Fair / Canticle” – Simon and Garfunkel – from the LP Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
  4. “Statesboro Blues” – Taj Mahal – from the LP Taj Mahal
  5. “Killing Floor” – The Electric Flag – from the LP A Long Time Comin’
  6. “Nobody’s Got Any Money In The Summer” – Roy Harper – from the LP Come Out Fighting Ghengis Smith
  7. “Come Away Melinda” – Tim Rose – from the LP Tim Rose
  8. “Flames” – Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera – from the LP Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera

The Rock Machine Turns You On influenced a generation of music fans , At the time, what was then called “underground music” was starting to achieve some commercial success in Europe, bolstered by new radio and TV programmes such as John Peel’s “Top Gear”. CBS competed actively for this new market against other “progressive” labels such as Elektra, Island, Immediate, and the EMI subsidiary Harvest, who followed with similar samplers of their acts. Although some of the featured artists were already stars, others such as Leonard Cohen and Spirit were only starting to become known in Europe, and the album made a major contribution to their success.

CBS released a second, similar, sampler album in the UK in 1968, Rock Machine I Love You. The company followed up these LPs in 1970 with three double sampler albums – Fill Your Head with Rock, Rockbuster,  and Together!.

Some years later, the affiliated company, Epic Records, used a similar format for The Rock Machine Still Turns You On, Vols. 1 and 2, in 1983

The importance of this unassuming album can’t be overstated. It was the first rock sampler album I ever saw or heard, and almost certainly the first such ever released here in the UK. It was in fact the first time I saw the actual term “rock” used to describe the music at all; previously the successive labels “underground” and “progressive” had been coined to cover the diverging (from “pop”) stream of album-based, art-for-art’s-sake music that had started with Dylan and Hendrix. It was the new music’s first budget release; at a time when the standard price of an album was 32/6 (about £1.63), this cost 14/6 (about 73p), just within the average teenager’s weekly pocket-money allocation. And it would spawn a whole new sub-genre of record releases peculiar to, and essential to, progressive rock: the cult of the sampler.

What came over then, and still impresses today, is the sheer quality of this dip into the CBS catalogue of 1969. Each track can be seen to have been carefully cherrypicked from its parent album, no sample being so leftfield as to frighten off the listener, though nobody venturing further into any of the represented albums would have been disappointed. Yet the overall diversity of the collection is astonishing, both in terms of styles and artists, in a way befitting progressive music. Practitioners of jazz-rock, country-rock, folk-rock, blues-rock, psychedelia and simple honest weirdness are all represented, whilst the acts featured include established big-hitters (Dylan, the Byrds, Simon & Garfunkel), contemporary heroes whose days were numbered (the Zombies, Moby Grape, the Peanut Butter Conspiracy, Tim Rose), newcomers who would fall at the first hurdle (the United States Of America, the Electric Flag, Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera) and up-and-coming artists who would go on to found dynasties (Leonard Cohen, Spirit, Blood Sweat & Tears, Roy Harper, Taj Mahal).

Two tracks above all left their mark on me. The Electric Flag’s “Killing Floor” induced me to purchase their album straightaway; this powerful number remains my favourite blues-rock AND jazz-rock performance of all time, with Mike Bloomfield on cloud nine and brass work to die for, the standout track from a solid album. By contrast, despite taking a perverse delight in “I Won’t Leave My Wooden Wife For You, Sugar” I somehow didn’t get round to buying the United States Of America’s only album until 2008, when a book review of it re-aroused my interest. This erotically engaging ditty with its homely brass band coda merely hints at the trippy weirdness of its fellow tracks – one to grow into over forty years, now to become a classic .

A steady stream of samplers followed as prog-rock blossomed, including the best of the lot: CBS’s double from 1970, Fill Your Head With Rock. Samplers were considered disposable, and originals are now quite rare and collectable (sadly, I disposed of all mine many years ago when thinning the collection). Whilst retrospectively compiled anthologies covering the whole life of a label are nowadays commonplace, original samplers with their snapshot of a moment in prog-rock’s history are not. The Rock Machine Turns You On is the only sampler ever to be reissued on CD in its original form – and that sadly minus Simon & Garfunkel’s “Scarborough Fair / Canticle”, probably due to some momentary petulance on Paul Simon’s part. It came out in 1996 and is now a rarity in its own right, never having been re-released. Sony could do a lot worse than reissue The Rock Machine Turns You On and Fill Your Head With Rock in their original forms, although licencing problems mean they probably won’t.

 

Steve Lamacq – Lost Alternatives

Most alternative music lived underground. It made a lot of noise, but no-one in the mainstream could hear it…. The nineties would see it go so much further than many of us expected. It wasn’t just the popularity of alternative music which would change; the music was constantly reinventing itself too, sucking in influences from different genres and different eras.

And that brings us to this compilation…Create a compilation which tries to dig a little deeper; which attempts to give another side of the nineties, which wasn’t Cool Britannia, Laddism, and Blur Vs Oasis. What’s here represents, at least one version, of the evolution of guitar music through the nineties, as told, not by the big hits, but by the limited edition singles, The Evening Session cult favourites and the bands who maybe never made it, but in some cases never wanted to anyway. “ Curated by acclaimed BBC 6 Music radio DJ and former NME journalist, Steve Lamacq, This 4CD compilation. 71 tracks from the 1990’s chosen by the UK’s leading Indie tastemaker. This is a great compilation. If you were a gig-going regular seeing ‘new bands’ in the 1990’s you will find lots to love here.

It is a useful historical over-view which tries valiantly to present as much as possible of the music on offer over the decade in the indie/guitar sphere and create some sort of evolutionary narrative… but inevitably it fails to be all-inclusive and ends up being just one mans choices in vaguely chronological order.

Steve Lamacq, for a leading BBC6 purveyor of taste, is pretty much some-one you can trust though.  He’s the same age as me, was a teenage Lurkers fan and we, I imagine, went through our teenage years listening to exactly the same music, diverging as we reached our twenties in the mid eighties.

Like with any boxed set or comp, every now and then you get a run of three songs in a row which are perfect; they run together beautifully and make you go ‘Yes!’ as each one starts and you recognise it within a second or two despite not having heard it for yonks.

Despite 71 tracks though,  there are so many bands missing; And I don’t just mean The big guns like Oasis, Blur, Verve and Pulp -there was no necessity for them to be there, but something from the pre-Sony Manics should have opened proceedings if we’re honest. Lamacq will be forever indirectly associated with them due to the For Real blood-letting which was during an interview with him.

Huggy Bear I can only assume refused permission for Her Jazz to be included – leaving Voodoo Queens the sole representative of Riot Grrrl groups.

It is just guitar bands ( No Red Snapper, Fluke or Credit To The Nation) and apparently “nothing which has been included on a ‘Shine’ compilation”, The Bands which deserved to be on here, are Shed 7,  the Headcoats, Mantaray, Flinch, Tindersticks, Baby Bird, Prolapse,  Gretchen Hofner, Bandit Queen, Thrum, Breed, Compulsion, Five Thirty, David Devant & his Spirit Wife, A House, Into Paradise, Die Cheerleader, the Flaming Stars, Add N to X, Quickspace, Nubiles,,, to name a few and there is nothing from the Too Pure  / Clawfist / Wiija labels   -Stereolab   Gallon Drunk…. but that at least means there is plenty of scope for a second volume.

There has been some comment about the ‘Lost’ part of the title. Suede, Charlatans etc are hardly ‘lost’. Even the more obscure acts are only a google and YouTube search away.  Nothing is really ‘lost’ any more.

CD 1   Is a mix of Baggy Northern sounds and Thames Valley Shoegazing to start with.  Ride sound tame and lame, Northside sound naive and fun, the New FAD’s are their generations A Certain Ratio. Curve sound class and ahead of the game.  Kitchens of Distinction emerge as the band whose back catalogue needs to be tracked down.   The Fraggle-Pop-Punk of the Family Cat, Senseless Things and MC4 somehow hasn’t aged well. particularly when they are followed by Teenage Fanclubs finest moment  Everything Flows… which is certainly does with a final four of Silverfish / Daisy Chainsaw / Voodoo Queens and the noisy experimental wonkiness of Cornershop.

CD 2 Is, to my mind the best, – 14 really great tracks out of the 19 – the New Wave of New Wave and Brit-Pop Division 2. (and Premier division debuts by Suede, Auteurs & Elastica)  all of  which are classics – as are Tiny Monroe, Salad and Mansuns contributions.

CD 3 is more of a mixed bag, genre and quality-wise.  The appalling, irritating Bis, the dull bluster of Travis and Marion, but then that classic Rialto song (Monday Morning 5:19)  and superb examples of the work of Strangelove, Whipping Boy and Scarfo – seriously good bands who should have been more than contenders.   Kenickie and Catatonia both sound excellent, now as then – and both frontwomen have gone on to deserved success, Cerys as Greatest Living Welshwoman and broadcaster and Lauren Laverne -purveyor of some terrible unbearable dance-music on 6-Music -but a superb Desert Island Discs host.

CD 4 Starts with Arab Strap and Mogwai so with Delgados has a strong Scottish flavour and marks a progression and seriousness as well as quality.  The Beta Band make sense in such company, as do Clinic, but Ten Benson, Wubble U and Campag Velocet do nothing for me and only prove stoners don’t always make great music.  Cay, Cable and Seafood are interesting but not a patch on some of the bands omitted.

The good stuff outweighs the iffy and it is a great, eminently listenable boxed set.  An American equivalent culled from the Nineties US underground would be interesting to hear -but probably wouldn’t be as pop and would stick to even tighter generic parameters.

I feel sorry for Lammo, his hands tied by the BBC, in that he cannot ‘promote’ his ‘product’ on their airwaves, when, if he’s anything like me, he probably wants to shout ‘Listen To This! It’s fuckin’ ace!’ because if its on here, you can guarantee that he loves it, and he wants to share his love and have a wallow in the nostalgia of the nineties for a while.

If you told us even as recently as six weeks ago that we’d be working on a Redux version of Black Sabbath’sVolume 4 and, before the end of March, artists including The Obsessed, Whores, Zakk Wylde, and Matt Pike would have all committed to be part of the project, we would’ve probably answered, “Wow.”

And if you’d then said, “Oh yeah, you’ll also assemble a Best of Black Sabbath companion LP featuring Earthless, Elephant Tree, Year of the Cobra, and tons of other great artists including a whole crop of brand-new Magnetic Eye roster bands, who by the way you’ll find time to sign during all the madness of your Vol. 4 Kickstarter,” we’d have most likely said, “piss off.” And yet, here we are, and all of the above has come to pass.

We are indeed reduxing Volume 4 and offering up a Best of Sabbath companion record, we do have some of the greatest heavy artists in the world committed to be part of this project, and we did somehow find time to sign three new bands during all of this, each of whom we’ll have a new record coming from later this year, and all of whom we’re inviting to be part of the project.

The hard stuff saga continues with Brown Acid – The Eighth Trip! Yet again, we’ve searched high and low to bring you ten tracks of straight blue flame fire from the golden age of heaviness. As usual, these rare tracks have been carefully curated, analogically sourced, and fully licensed so you can listen guilt free and save a lot of time and money tracking down the original copies. This Eighth Trip comes straight at ya with an all out attack, quite literally. The residents of St. Clair Shores should consider themselves lucky to have been so close to the greatness of Attack! “School Daze” kicks out the jams Detroit-style, but has enough flair and style to have our main man Jimi rolling over in his grave. Another prime example of why Detroit is known as Rock City!
Speaking of rock, White Rock will knock your stank-ass socks off with their 1972 burner “Please Don’t Run Away”. This 45 was privately released by this Houston-based band that reportedly played shows with Josefus, Stone Axe, and Purple Sun. And it was basically unknown until it surfaced at the Austin Record Convention in 2018! The fact that there are still completely unknown records out there to be discovered never ceases to amaze us. They don’t say “Don’t Mess With Texas” for nothin’! Riverside called Austin home way before anyone was worried about keeping it weird. This two-sider from 1974 rips from front to back. It’s also exclusively available here and is virtually unknown. Go ahead, try to look for it anywhere. Currently, there’s no proof anywhere online that it exists.

From our neighbours up north, we bring you Luke and the Apostles! Don’t be fooled by the name, this ain’t no Xian group, even though this 45 is of biblical proportions. The flip of this single “You Make Me High” is a Faces-esque ballad of the highest caliber that will move you to tears if you’re not careful with it, but “Not Far Off” isn’t about moving you emotionally; it’s about moving you physically. Fuck jam? We think so. The Doors and Elektra Records’ producer Paul Rothchild called the Luke and the Apostles LP the “greatest album [he] never got to make”. The lyrics to this 1977 single on Vacation Records are about as boneheaded as it gets. Hard rock songs from working class men about working hard and letting loose is a common theme in the Brown Acid realm, and “I Need My Music” by Mine Hill, New Jersey’s Tourists, is yet another great one to get you through the work week. I think we can all agree: we need our music too…among other things!
Ohio strikes again. This time a bit later than the other Buckeye State singles we’ve comped, but no less bangin’! On the Chance record label, the Bartos Brothers Band is billed as Gambler, but post-release, the band covered at least some of the copies with stickers that corrected this. There’s very little information about the Bartos Brothers Band online, and as of this writing, the release date is incorrect on Discogs and the Popsike hit very wrongly lists the genre as “Glam/Hair Metal” from the 1980s. We’re stoked to be compiling this single for the first time ever and to be setting the record straight.

And yet again, Ohio brings the thunder! We brought you the B-side of Inside Experience’s sole 45 back on the Third Trip and now we exhaust the band’s output by presenting their especially psychedelic cover of Cream’s “Tales of Brave Ulysses”. The band pressed and sold out of 500 copies of this record back in 1968 thanks to some airplay on Detroit’s CKLW, but they never recorded again. However, Inside Experience’s lead guitarist and singer, Marty Soski, went on to play in Lance (as heard on the Fifth Trip) and two metal bands which you will be hearing sooner than later…
Karma, slightly better known as The Contents Are, released an LP and a 45 in 1967 and then followed up with their swan song “New Mexico” in 1969. The single was oddly released under Karma on the Onk Enterprizez label with “N.S.U.” as the B-side and on Rok Records as the flip to “Future Days” as The Contents Are. Apparently, Mercury Records bought the rights to the Rok 45 with the intention to release it nationally, but never actually got around to it. Their loss!
Obviously we don’t need to go into how much great music Memphis, Tennessee has brought us over the years, but Moloch doesn’t usually get mentioned when we’re talking about the “Home of the Blues” and the “Birthplace of Rock and Roll.” Maybe we should change that. Moloch played with The MC5 and The Stooges and recorded an LP in 1969 for the Stax subsidiary, Enterprise Records. Although the band made a great blues rock record, it sadly didn’t get the love it deserved and the band folded. Moloch guitarist, Lee Baker, reformed the band with a slightly different line-up and released this 45 in 1972 against great odds. It too was unfairly overlooked…until now.
While we’re still talking about Memphis, y’all ever heard of this guy, Elvis Presley? Apparently, he was kind of a big deal and popularized a song called “Heartbreak Hotel” back in 1956. That’s cool and all, but damn us if we don’t dig Grump’s 1969 take on the song a whole hell of a lot more than the King’s version. Maybe that’s sacrilege, but nothing’s sacred when it comes to Brown Acid.
Some of the best thrills of the Internet music revolution is the ability to find extremely rare music with great ease. But even with such vast archives to draw from, quite a lot of great songs have gone undiscovered for nearly half a century — particularly in genres that lacked hifalutin arty pretense. Previously, only the most extremely dedicated and passionate record collectors had the stamina and prowess to hunt down long forgotten wonders in dusty record bins — often hoarding them in private collections, or selling at ridiculous collector’s prices. Legendary compilations like Nuggets, Pebbles, ad nauseum, have exhausted the mines of early garage rock and proto-punk, keeping alive a large cross-section of underground ephemera. However, few have delved into and expertly archived the wealth of proto-metal, pre-stoner rock tracks collected on Brown Acid. Lance Barresi, co-owner of L.A./Chicago retailer Permanent Records has shown incredible persistence in tracking down a stellar collection of rare singles from the 60s and 70s for the growing compilation series. Partnered with Daniel Hall of RidingEasy Records, the two have assembled a selection of songs that’s hard to believe have remained unheard for so long.
“I essentially go through hell and high water just to find these records,” Barresi says. “Once I find a record worthy of tracking, I begin the (sometimes) extremely arduous process of contacting the band members and encouraging them to take part. Daniel and I agree that licensing all the tracks we’re using for Brown Acid is best for everyone involved,” rather than simply bootlegging the tracks. When all of the bands and labels haven’t existed for 30-40 years or more, tracking down the creators gives all of these tunes a real second chance at success.
“There’s a long list of songs that we’d love to include,” Barresi says. “But we just can’t track the bands down. I like the idea that Brown Acid is getting so much attention, so people might reach out to us.”

Brown Acid: The Eighth Trip will be available everywhere on LP, CD and download on April 20th, 2019.

This new 3 CD Re-Mastered Box Set Celebrating The Musical sounds of the so called British “UNDERGROUND” Rock Music Of 1968. featuring tracks by Deep Purple, Jethro Tull, Barclay James Harvest, Julie Driscoll, Brain Auger & The Trinity, Spooky Tooth, Traffic, The Move, Crazy World Of Arthur Brown, Van Der Graaf Generator, Procul Harum, Genesis, Caravan, Jeff Beck, Pretty Things, The Incredible String Band, Tomorrow.

Esoteric Recordings are pleased to announce the release of “Revolution – Underground Sounds of 1968”, a 3CD clamshell boxed set celebrating the so-called “underground” rock music 1968, a year that saw huge changes, both musical and social. 1968 was a pivotal year for creativity in British rock, beginning with some influences of psychedelia still present in work by ground-breaking artists such as Pretty Things, Tomorrow, Incredible String Band, Idle Race, Traffic and The Move, but gradually giving way to styles influenced by jazz, blues, folk and more that would eventually become termed as “progressive”, “folk-rock” and “hard” rock, all of which championed by “underground” figures of the day such as DJ John Peel on his BBC Radio One show Top Gear and by publications such as International Times and Oz.The common thread among all of these artists was an emphasis on experimentation and a desire to push the perceived boundaries of popular music. It was also a year that would see the very first record releases by bands that would go on to achieve success and influence in the 1970s such as Deep Purple, Jethro Tull, Barclay James Harvest, Genesis, Status Quo, Van Der Graaf Generator and Caravan. Aside from featuring better known acts such as Crazy World of Arthur Brown, Procol Harum and Pentangle, this compilation also features lesser known acts.

Revolution Box

The common thread among all of these artists was an emphasis on experimentation and a desire to push the perceived boundaries of popular music. It was also a year that would see the very first record releases by bands that would go on to achieve success and influence in the 1970s such as Deep Purple, Jethro Tull, Barclay James Harvest, Genesis, Status Quo, Van Der Graaf Generator and Caravan. Aside from featuring better known acts such as Crazy World of Arthur Brown, Procol Harum and Pentangle, this compilation also features lesser known acts that produced work of a wide breadth such as Eyes of Blue, Love Sculpture, The Action, Dantalian’s Chariot, Elmer Gantry’s Velvet Opera, Gun, Second Hand, The Moles and Blonde on Blonde.

This collection celebrates a creative period when rock music was evolving into something altogether more serious, moving away from the single as medium to give way to the dominance of the album. Feed your head with Revolution – Underground Sounds of 1968.

Revolution Box Set

Extensive 5CD/book set exploring the ‘second wave’ of music on Merseyside, from 1976-1988

Features classics, rarities, album tracks and previously unreleased gems from Echo And The Bunnymen, Teardrop Explodes, OMD, The La’s, Frankie Goes To Hollywood, Dead Or Alive, China Crisis, A Flock Of Seagulls, Wild Swans, Big In Japan and many more.

5CD + 56pp A5 book format contains many artists’ own sleeve-notes, previously unseen photographs and essays from key observers and participants in the city’s music scene – Bernie Connor, Mike Badger, Yorkie and Joe McKechnie.

Few musicians have had as lasting an impact on music as Joni Mitchell.  In her four-decade career, she made groundbreaking music that traversed genres and continually stunned fans and critics alike.  The music icon celebrated her 75th birthday in style last November, as Jörn Weisbrodt and The Music Center in Los Angeles hosted a pair of star-studded Joni 75: A Birthday Celebration concerts in her honor.  The line-up (which Joni helped select) featured many of her closest friends and dearest collaborators, including Graham Nash, Seal, Chaka Khan,Kris Kristofferson, and James Taylor.  Also on the bill were Diana Krall, Brandi Carlile, Rufus Wainwright, Emmylou Harris, Glen Hansard, Norah Jones, and Los Lobos with La Marisoul, Cesar Castro & Xochi Flores.  Featuring a set of Joni classics and deep cuts from across her career, each night was a thrilling tribute full of excellent music.  November 7th was even more magnificent, as Mitchell herself attended and even appeared onstage to blow out birthday candles and sing along as the all-star band and more than 3,000 fans sang “Happy Birthday” and “Big Yellow Taxi” in tribute to her.

Next month, Joni Mitchell fans will be able to enjoy the celebrations again.  Global film distributors Trafalgar Releasing and The Music Center have partnered for a special, one-night-only screening of Joni 75: A Birthday Celebrationtaking place in movie theaters across the U.S. and Canada on Thursday, February 7th.  The two-hour, Martyn Atkins-directed film includes footage of the entire concert (captured over two nights), along with special behind-the-scenes interviews with the artists.

“We are thrilled to bring audiences together in movie theaters across North America to experience this magical evening,” said Trafalgar Releasing SVP of Programming, Kymberli Frueh. “The incredible talent featured in this concert is a true testament to the impact that Joni has had on musicians and fans alike.”

PRE-ORDER SOUNDTRACK ALBUM AT AMAZON.COM

A CD of highlights from the concert — also entitled Joni 75: A Birthday Celebration will be available on March 1 from Decca The album’s 16 tracks include such highlights as Brandi Carlile and Kris Kristofferson’s heartfelt take on “A Case of You,” Seal’s breathtaking “Both Sides Now,” Diana Krall’s haunting take on “Amelia,” and  and Los Lobos and Friends’ rollicking “Dreamland,” which features Chaka Khan reprising her guest vocal spot, as she did on the original recording back in 1977.

Anchoring each live performance — on CD and on screen — is a top-notch house band full of Joni’s collaborators.  Led by drummer Brian Blade and pianist Jon Cowherd, the band also includes guitarists Greg Leisz and Marvin Sewell, trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, as well as Jeff Haynes on percussion, Chris Thomas on bass, Bob Sheppard on woodwinds, and special guest Scarlet Rivera on violin.

With a wealth of musical talent and selections from across Joni’s illustrious career, Joni 75: A Birthday Celebration is a fitting tribute to one of the legendary musicians of our time.  The upcoming film screening and CD are perfect for fans who want to relive those two nights in November, or for those who weren’t able to see it in person. The film will screen across North America for one night only on February 7th.  You can find the screening nearest you and purchase tickets at Joni75.com.  Scroll down to see the trailer.  The soundtrack CD is set to arrive from Decca on March 1st.

From the makers of the Junkshop Glam genre defining Velvet Tinmine, Glitterbest and Boobs compilations… comes this book ending box set.

60 tracks of the finest slices of JSG in its various guises, as established by collectors around the world over the past decade. Including tracks from the USA, New Zealand, Netherlands, Sweden, Iceland, Australia as well as homegrown UK. Some previously unreleased, many first time on CD.

Themed by arch JSG collector and musician Phil King into three groups; Rock Off! for the heads down boogie sounds; Tubthumpers & Hellraisers for the footstomping hand clapping pop pounders; Elegance & Decadence for the mascara masquerading gender bending weird and wonderful.

The box set sweeps up a colourful array of musical renegades and nomads as they moved and shook the scene, such as: first Juicy Lucy vocalist Ray Moon, ex-New York Dolls Rick Rivets band The Brats, Baby Grande the forerunners of The Church, TV Smith pre-Adverts in Sleaze , Jimmy Edwards a cohort of Jimmy Pursey in Sham 69 in earlier solo mode and, as in house producer of Steve Elgin at Dawn, ex- Spider From Mars Woody Woodmansey, 60’s northern soul chanteuse Glo Macari backed by Slowload who get their own track as produced by Vic Maile, actor Richard Strange as Kid Strange in Doctors of Madness, Angel produced by Mick and Andy from The Sweet. Plus stalwart pop auteurs Jonathan King and Mike Berry.

Some further context comes from inclusion of relevant cuts by Mott The Hoople, Hello, Iggy & The Stooges, Be Bop Deluxe, Third World War.

Three discs in individual wallets, housed in a clam shell box, which also includes a 36 page booklet.

The booklet contains a fascinating and highly-informative 2000 word essay from an authority on the genre – Tony Barber – the bassist with the Buzzcocks.