Posts Tagged ‘Pennsylvania’

Swearin' to Release New Album This Year, Share North American Tour Dates

Philadelphia-based indie-rock band Swearin’, featuring Allison Crutchfield, Kyle Gilbride, Jeff Bolt and Amanda Bartley, will release their first new music since 2013’s Surfing Strange this year.

The band recently played their first live shows in three years, opening for Superchunk on tour in the northeast U.S. Swearin’ have now signed a record deal with Merge Records and are set to release a new album later this year.

Gilbride said of the band’s reunion, forthcoming album and recent record deal:

If time were real, it would have healed our wounds, but it’s not, so we decided to make a rock record. And to make one the way we always have! Quickly, at home, and for no one in particular. Fortunately for us, Merge hadn’t dismissed us as an oddity from earlier in the decade and said, “sup with that record?”And with their help, we’ve been reintroduced to polite society. Sometimes a band takes on a life of its own, and it seems this one came back to us when it was ready, and in its new form, to stay for the foreseeable future.

The band also announced a new joint tour with Mike Krol in August on the West Coast, Swearin’ will play a pair of U.S. shows with Ought in as well.

Their record label, Merge, hinted that fans should stay tuned for upcoming Swearin’ news by following the band on Facebook and by following Allison Crutchfield on Instagram, too. after releasing two beloved full-lengths, 2012’s Swearin’ and 2013’s Surfing Strange, the Philadelphian band quietly put things on hold.

It was due, at least in part, to the band’s main songwriters, Allison Crutchfield and Kyle Gilbride, ending their romantic relationship. but when the band found themselves in a room again years later, the conversation turned back to Swearin’. “without any hesitation or inhibitions,” said Crutchfield, “we asked, ‘what would it take from each of us? what would we want to accomplish if we decided to be a band again?’” they realized that what they all wanted was to not just play shows, but to make a new record. they wanted to do something that reflected the people they’d become during those intervening years. before long, Crutchfield and Gilbride had a new batch of Swearin’ songs, ones that meshed with the sound they’d originally developed together but boldly pushed things forward. Fall Into the Sun is a Swearin’ record that doesn’t try to obscure the passage of time but instead embraces it. “getting older, your tastes change, and what you want to do changes,” said Bolt. that can be seen in songs like “big change,” where Crutchfield says goodbye to Philly and the scene that she came up in, or in “dogpile,” where Gilbride offers the line any aging punk can relate to: “by pure dumb luck i’ve gotten where i’m going.” “there was a lot on our minds, and it was a super fertile time to put a bunch of songs together,” said Gilbride. it’s true of the material found on Fall Into the Sun, but it’s noticeable in the album’s production, too. much like the band’s previous albums, Gilbride anchored the recording and producing of the record, but this time around, the band worked to make the process feel more collaborative than ever before. “i feel like this was the first time i could look at a Swearin’ record and say that i co-produced it, and that felt really good,” said Crutchfield. Listening to Fall Into the Sun, Swearin’ is a more confident, collaborative version than the one people first came to know.

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Released October 5th, 2018
Swearin’ is
Jeff Bolt 
Kyle Gilbride 
Allison Crutchfield 

All songs written by Allison Crutchfield and Kyle Gilbride

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This is the second compilation in the Don’t Stop Now series. It is still an expression of love, anger, hope and protest. Let it serve as a reminder that the fight for justice is not over, that the celebration of diversity is essential to progress, that we must work together for what is fair and good. Can’t stop. Won’t stop. Don’t stop now.

This time around all of the proceeds from this compilation benefit
RAICES (Refugee & Immigrant Center for Education & Legal Services)
They promote justice by providing free and low-cost legal services to under served immigrant children, families, and refugees in Texas.

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Read more about the work Raices does here.www.raicestexas.org/about/

Released November 5, 2018

This compilation is an expression of love, anger, hope and protest on inauguration day. Let it serve as a reminder that the fight for justice is not over, that the celebration of diversity is essential to progress, that we must work together for what is fair and good. Can’t stop. Won’t Stop. Don’t stop now.

All proceeds from this compilation benefit the American Civil Liberties Union, an organization that defends individual freedoms in the face of government abuse, including speech and religion, a woman’s right to choose, the right to due process, and citizens rights to privacy. Each dollar donated will help protect the people of the United States, especially those most vulnerable, from the reckless authority of a Trump presidency.

Released January 20, 2017

empath-1539969295

The very foundation of Empath is enough to guarantee some buzz. Formed by members of All Dogs and Perfect Pussy, the band of schooled DIY punks quietly released their two-song debut Crystal Reality way back in 2016, but it wasn’t until this year that they were able to commit to the project more seriously. Their breakthrough tape, Liberating Guilt And Fear, channels the pop punk and hardcore that fueled their previous projects, but there’s a candy-colored sheen to these songs that glimmers beneath scuzzy production. It’s a promising start for a band predestined to turn heads.

Empath is Catherine Elicson, Garrett Koloski, Emily Shanahan, and Randall Coon

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Throughout I’ll Sing, Shannen Moser reveals a strong understanding of relationships – not only the influence they have on us but also the inner turmoil they create. “Haircut Song” is a deeply poignant, often haunting portrayal of the power this human connection has over us. Recalling a relationship, she presents us with a different kind of love song: You said I’m doomed to love you, and that’s the truth/It’s a sort of ***ed up way to say it, but I loved you too. As the song progresses, she lays bare her desperation when things go sour: A Broken heart will convince itself of many things/I will silence my own beating heart, that’s the sh*t you don’t want to hear/I would sell myself out for a lifetime of “I love you, love you, my dear”. The song is beautiful, sarcastic and heartbreaking all at once. It hits all the right receptors in the brain, leaving you wanting more; this is ok, because the rest of I’ll Sing delivers the goods.

Although Moser’s lyrics are her greatest asset – giving I’ll Sing an extra bite through witty storytelling – there’s no denying her skill as a musician. Effortlessly blending folk, blues and country, there’s a good deal of variety throughout her songwriting. Sometimes, we get nothing but the dialed-down plucking of a guitar, but “Hallelujah” busts out the banjos and enters borderline ho-down mode as it progresses. Whichever method she employs, all the songs are given an extra jolt of life by her soaring vocals and relatable themes of love and friendship. “One For Mama” is a real tear-jerker, with bluesy guitars and strings making way for the croon of Momma, I’m never too old for your love. And as she closes with the Americana-tinged title-track, she makes it apparent she plans on making the best of life – pressing on and “singing” even in its most vicious moments. It’s one hell of a way to conclude such a powerful album; the slower pace allows her voice to really capture the moment in perhaps her most alluring performance here. If any of the tracks could be called soulful, this is it. It’s only one piece of the gorgeous puzzle, though. In its entirety, I’ll Sing is overwhelmingly affective – one of those albums that connects with you on a personal level. There are other notable songwriters this year, but few of them, if any, have as much to say as Shannen Moser does on her gripping sophomore effort.

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released September 7th, 2018

Recorded by Cameron Konner & Eric Muth in Philadelphia. Vocals and guitars- Shannen Moser

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Since 2014, Zoe Reynolds has been making music under the Kississippi moniker, but the release of her debut full length, Sunset Blush signals a change for the artist.

Following a series of demo releases and EPs, Reynolds believes she has finally found her voice, calling Sunset Blush an honest recognition of the music she always wanted to make.
The album fully immerses listeners in Kississippi’s sincerely heartfelt world, with Reynolds sharing every strength and struggle that fueled her writing.
The album’s namesake comes from a flavor of boxed wine that’s frequently appeared throughout Reynolds’ adulthood; consumed on rooftops reached by ladders or in between sets at house shows.
The album enlivens these moments saturated in nostalgia for listeners, Sunset Blush is more than just a debut, it’s Reynolds’ reassurance to herself and others that even when things are at their worst, brighter days are ahead, and you have the strength needed to get through it.

Katie Ellen’s debut album, 2017’s Cowgirl Blues, saw frontwoman Anika Pyle kicking against the traditions and norms that come with adulthood—namely, love, major life changes, cohabitation, and domesticity. She penned the anti-marriage anthem with “Sad Girls Club,” a standout track that featured the defiant heartbreaker of a chorus: “Sad girls don’t make good wives.” On the Philly band’s new, five-song EP, Still Life, Pyle is still trying to wrap her head around these things.

On opener “Lighthouse,” Pyle reckons with warring thoughts—wanting to be brave enough to swim into life’s uncharted deep end, but feeling tied down by the anchor of fear and anxiety. Later, on the EP’s title track, she surrenders to the idea that love is more powerful and wild than our capacity to tame it: “You can’t make love stay / Do your best to hold it in place.”

Musically, Pyle flexes a few new tricks she’s trying out, like on “Still Life,” where her voice spirals into borderline operatic delivery, a far jump from the quick and dirty style she cut her teeth on in her former pop punk project Chumped.

Still Life is out on Lauren Records.

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released June 3rd, 2018

KISSISSIPPI promo photo

Since 2014, Zoe Reynolds has been making music under the Kississippi moniker, but the release of her debut full length, Sunset Blush signals a change for the artist.

Following a series of demo releases and EPs, Reynolds believes she has finally found her voice, calling Sunset Blush an honest recognition of the music she always wanted to make.
The album fully immerses listeners in Kississippi’s sincerely heartfelt world, with Reynolds sharing every strength and struggle that fueled her writing.
The album’s namesake comes from a flavor of boxed wine that’s frequently appeared throughout Reynolds’ adulthood; consumed on rooftops reached by ladders or in between sets at house shows.
The album enlivens these moments saturated in nostalgia for listeners, Sunset Blush is more than just a debut, it’s Reynolds’ reassurance to herself and others that even when things are at their worst, brighter days are ahead, and you have the strength needed to get through it.

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This is a solid new album. Zoe’s voice sounds more confident and quirkily charming than ever. From the get-go the band feels tighter and more agile than on any previous release.

Katie Bennett’s voice rarely rises above a whisper on her lo-fi indie-pop band’s new album, on which thinly strummed guitars and gingerly tapped drums sound like they’re being played by a band of lounging cats struggling to wake up after a very successful Sunday nap. But her sturdily crafted songs still echo around in your head, full of vivid personal detail, melodic charm and the thrill that comes with witnessing a wide-open heart and mind discovering the world — even when the people in it don’t always reflect her generosity back. The guitars of “Around You” swirl and chime as Bennett sings about finding someone new to hang out with; the slowly drifting “Be Home Soon” wrings every instant of joy from a work-week-ending subway ride home; “Tom Or Mike Or Pat Or” is a gentle spree of sensual imagery (a mouth full of sunflower seeds, a fast car, bare legs, red lips, a bug bite on her ass) over glistening jangle. Though they are slight, the snow globe sound worlds Free Cake For Every Creature create have a summery verdancy, and Bennett displays a sneaky way with one-liners all over the place (“our bodies were like spaghetti, tangled and sauce-less,” she observes on “Whole World Girl”). Pretty impressive for a band that doesn’t play loud enough to disturb a lounging cat.

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Released August 3rd, 2018

all songs by Katie Bennett
all songs recorded by Katie Bennett, Francis Lyons & Heeyoon Won at home in West Philly
mixed & mastered by Mike Ditrio

Katie Bennett– main vocals & guitar, keys
Heeyoon Won– bass & vocals
Francis Lyons– drums, keys, guitar, vocals on “Be Home Soon”
Meghan Center- vocals on “In Your Car” & “Shake it Out”
Meg McCauley- vocals on “Around You”
Pete Gill- pedal steel on “Sideline/ Skyline,” “Sunday Afternoon,” “In Your Car,” “Hometown Hero” & “Be Home Soon”
Felix Walworth- banjo on “In Your Car”
Evan Marré- guitar on “Riding into the Sunset in a Busted Car” & “Tom or Mike or Pat or”

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In its most direct form, pop punk tends to deal in immediate emotional states, a megaphone blaring about the here and now. But Swearin’ has a more complicated relationship with time. After putting out two lean albums in 2012 and 2013, they slipped into hibernation and return now with a song about the uncanny perspective granted by growing older. “Grow Into a Ghost,” is the first single from the band’s forthcoming Fall Into the Sun LP, pounds with the kind of urgency you might expect in a song about confused youth, even though its lyrics concern a hard, long look at the past.

Allison Crutchfield sings about the phenomenon of drifting away from someone who used to play a huge role in your life—a scenario that could fit into a somber, wistful tune, but has more wallop amid Swearin’s bright, crunchy guitars and pounding drums. “I hang out with old friends/And they unknowingly remind me/Of who I was before we met,” she sings over insistent scrapes of bass. At the chorus, which ranks among the catchiest Swearin’ has written, she repeats the phrase “I watch you” until the words start to jumble together. The phrase is lodged inside a question“Will I watch you grow into a ghost?”—but the incessant repetition of those three words implies that Crutchfield has already answered it as she peers back over the years. A thundering return, “Grow Into a Ghost” crystallizes Swearin’s skill for headbanging away the thoughts that might leave another band hanging their heads.

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releases October 5th, 2018

Swearin’ is
Jeff Bolt
Kyle Gilbride
Allison Crutchfield

All songs written by Allison Crutchfield (Domino Publishing Company [BMI]) and Kyle Gilbride