Posts Tagged ‘Wichita Recordings’

Image may contain: 4 people

If the apocalyptic album title doesn’t set the tone for The Feels’ sophomore album, there’s this brilliant verse from opening track “Cars”: “All smiles DJT / War dogs on the street / The land of the free / One nation under fraud,” Laena Geronimo sings, adding just the right amount of acidity to the final word. You’d think more rock bands would have stepped up as social commentators the past couple of years; thankfully, thankfully Geronimo, Amy Allen, Michael Perry and (the now-departed) Shannon Lay did. A mix of post-punk and garage-rock, with stinging lyrics and licks worthy of the riot grrrl artists of the past, “Post Earth” assails the present.

The world is burning, and while we’re enjoying our last dances, the people in charge are worrying about whiter teeth. As for the future, the title track wryly wonders about “the one percent’s new life on Mars.” If only they’d leave sooner.

Feels post punk rock + roll whatever band born and raised in Los Angeles, CA and taking the world by storm with the wild energy of their live shows and their 2019 release POST EARTH released on Wichita Recordings. Also check out their Ty Segall produced, self-titled debut LP, released in 2016 on Castle Face Records (LP/CD) and Burger Records (cassette).

Band Members
Laena Geronimo
Michael Rudes
Amy Allen

After a two-year hiatus, Froth are back with their most fully realized work to date, ​”Duress”. Co-produced with longtime friend and collaborator Tomas Dolas (Oh Sees/Mr. Elevator) at his analog-focused Studio 22 in Cypress Park, CA, the record is unapologetically experimental yet undeniably accessible – combining some of the band’s strongest hooks with left-field sounds and unexpected flourishes of electronica. Joo Joo Ashworth has matured into a talented producer in his own right, communicating his singular vision through studio technique as much as his angular, Verlaine-inspired guitar sound. As always, the rhythm section of Jeremy Katz and Cameron Allen displays a tightness and sense of mutual understanding only achieved through years of friendship and extensive touring.

http://

“Duress” sees the band stepping outside the shadow of their influences and into something wholly their own. It’s an impressive and self-assured statement from a group only just entering their prime

Band Members
JooJoo Ashworth- Guitar/VOX
Jeremy Katz- Guitar/bass
Cameron Allen- Drums
released June 7th, 2019

Image may contain: one or more people, ocean, text, water and outdoor

Legendary British shoegazers Ride have shared a new cut from their imminent new album, This Is Not A Safe Place, Like other tracks in Ride’s discography, “Repetition” is poppier than other shoegaze songs. Swirling guitars intertwine with jubilant synths, crafting a sunny single that sounds like if Kraftwerk were stripped of technological anxieties and linked up with Devo.

Frontman Andy Bell smiles throughout the track, encouraging listeners to embrace patterns amid substantial life changes. “Repetition is a form of change / So don’t be fazed if the backdrops change,” he chants encouragingly during the chorus. Per the track’s YouTube description, Bell writes that the track “succeeds in bringing me back to all of the things we were into and talked about when we were 18, but also being of the moment, in 2019.”

Ride reformed in 2014 to do some touring and finally released their first new album in 21 years, Weather Diaries, in 2017 via Wichita. That was followed by the 2018 EP, Tomorrow’s Shore. As with those two releases, Erol Alkan produced This Is Not a Safe Place. Alan Moulder mixed the album, the fourth Ride album he has mixed. The band came together at the end of 2018 and the beginning of 2019. A previous press release said the band were influenced by “the Jean Michel Basquiat exhibition at London’s Barbican Centre and the post-punk sound of The Fall and Sonic Youth, for an album rich in their trademark shoegaze atmosphere, whilst simultaneously sounding rejuvenated and creatively ambitious.”

Band Members
Andy Bell,
Laurence Colbert,
Mark Gardener,
Steve Queralt

This Is Not A Safe Place is out on August. 16th via Wichita Recordings.

Image may contain: text and water

Ride opened a fresh chapter with 2017’s ‘Weather Diaries’, a terrific album that found the shoegaze band re-igniting their essential creative chemistry. Produced by Erol Alkan – a long time advocate for the band – it was followed by a lengthy international tour, including some landmark shows.

Recently hinting that they were once again in the studio, Ride have now detailed plans for their next album. Once again produced by Erol Alkan, ‘This Is Not A Safe Place’ will be released on August 16th, through the band’s home Wichita Recordings.

New song ‘Future Love’ is the ideal comeback, a stunning, completely unguarded track that speaks of pure, unashamed optimism. Driven by the positive energy coursing through the band’s veins, this is pristine Ride, managing to recall their fine early work without emulating it.

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, people standing, beard, sunglasses and outdoor

Los Angeles trio Froth have placed some distance between their days of fake band hijinks (think staged publicity photos and blank vinyl pressings) and the present, announcing the due date of their forthcoming record, “Duress”, out everywhere via Wichita Recordings June 7th. Froth have also shared their first single and music video (dir. Courtney Gavin of The Courtneys) from the project—a grimy-meets-dreamy strummer that, in true prankster fashion, centers around the internet’s infamous Yanny vs. Laurel debate.

“This song is about a guy who listened to the Yanny/Laurel thing and he can only hear Laurel,” the band share in a statement. “He’s really passionate about Laurel being the correct pronunciation to the point where he will die before admitting otherwise. In the end, he reveals that he loves his girlfriend more than he loves the correct pronunciation of ‘Laurel/Yanny.’”

All jokes aside, “Laurel” is a lighthearted foray into shoegaze-soaked noise-rock, offering up the sort of dazed, nostalgic frivolity that reminds you of warming temperatures. Watch the music video for “Laurel”

“Laurel” is the first song shared from our forthcoming album. The title of that album is Duress

No photo description available.

Indoor Pets (formerly known as Get Inuit) will check boxes for those who love classic Weezer but cringed at their recent attempts at relevance, as well as those who prefer some extra sugar in their indie-rock tea. The British quartet are set to release their debut album, Be Content, on March 8th via Wichita Recordings. With vibrant guitars and frontman Jamie Glass’ high-pitched wails, tracks like “Hi” and “Being Strange” prove they know their way around a syrupy pop hook. It’s not exactly revolutionary to pair angsty lyrics with bubbly pop melodies, but one thing Indoor Pets can claim for themselves is Glass’ distinct, sugary pipes, cheery hooks that are anything but flimsy and riffs that add just enough biting clamor to counteract their highly carbonated pop.

Taken from the debut album ‘Be-Content’.

Image may contain: text

“I’m so scared to get out of here / But I really want to get out of here.” It’s a line from “Strange Light”—a late standout from the sophomore LP by The Goon Sax and I’m not sure there’s a lyric that better sums up the feelings of late adolescence. Those prime years when your conflicting instincts are all fucking with each other, and the endless possibilities preached at you from childhood become paralyzing instead of promising. Growing pains and dawning realizations abound, but it’s in this mess that we finally wind up meeting ourselves. It’s an experience you might have all over again after listening to We’re Not Talking, the latest effort from the Brisbane trio. The band’s first album, filled with achingly familiar suburban references like Target and sweaty-palmed hand-holding, was released when Louis Forster, James Harrison and Riley Jones were just 17. This makes Talking, released two years later, an interesting crystallization of growing up. Taken out of context, a line like “I never knew what love meant / And I still don’t,” would be grounds for a heartbreaking ballad, but here it’s just a passing observation, a scanning self-analysis on the way to being an adult. For The Goon Sax, growing up sounds pretty good.

Image may contain: 3 people, guitar and outdoor

A band of 19-year-olds from Australia who have a knack for incredibly thoughtful and structured indie pop, the Goon Sax’s second album is a tremendous reflection of the leaps and bounds the band has taken over its short life. They fall very easily into the grand tradition of Australian and New Zealand indie bands without batting an eye, which is both to be expected considering member Louis Forster is the son of Robert Forster of the Go-Betweens, but also a bit of a surprise since his reported musical awakening was not his dad’s band, but Green Day’s American Idiot. “We Can’t Win” is the album’s understated masterpiece, something that both evokes and transcends its teenage story and authors, much like the album as a whole.

Named after Australian bagged wine, the Goon Sax travel in teenage ennui, that era of your life where the possibilities are endless and your ability to do anything — or even know which movie to watch — feels infinitesimal. Their sophomore album, We’re Not Talking is full of e•mo•tion and teenage malaise, and “Make Time 4 Life” might be the band’s masterpiece so far: It’s a song full of tiny moments of young love, both flourishing and dissipating. This was the best album to overthink your life to this year.

http://

Band Members
James Harrison, Louis Forster, Riley Jones

Image may contain: 4 people, outdoor

After signing with indie label Wichita Recordings, British rockers Indoor Pets have announced their debut album, “Be Content”, out next year but not until March. They shared a new single, “Being Strange,” which follows the release of their previous single “Hi.”

Previously known as Get Inuit, Indoor Pets sound a little like classic Weezer trying their hand at bubblegum pop, or Pixies dropping a pop-punk record. You’ll be surprised to know that frontman Jamie Glass’ voice isn’t manipulated with autotune and he didn’t suck helium from a balloon—those high-pitched harmonies are the real deal. If Indoor Pets were around in the ‘00s, “Being Strange” would’ve spread like wildfire in the U.S.—blasting out of car radios, shopping mall speakers and skate park boomboxes, and with a video all over MTV. That’s not to say that Indoor Pets don’t bring anything different to the table. You’d be hard pressed to find many bands naturally singing like Glass, unironically basking in candy-coated pop hooks while still shredding power chords.

New single from Indoor Pets.

Webb550lp cloudnothings lbb ps

Last Building Burning is the product of eight days with producer Randall Dunn (Sunn O))), Wolves in the Throne Room, Boris) in Texas studio Sonic Ranch. Clocking in just over half an hour, the eight-song album sees Cloud Nothings capture their onstage appeal with help from Dunn, who Baldi describes as “technically minded without relying on technology to perfect the live sound.” In that, Last Building Burning is a return to Cloud Nothing’s sharpest form – the unhinged, feverish, guitar-heavy sound that they explode with onstage – without their early angst. “It’s not an angry record,” says Baldi. “It’s a very joyous thing for me. And it feels so nice to scream again, especially when you know people in the crowd will be screaming along back at you.”

“So Right So Clean” is the latest song to be taken from the Cloud Nothings album, Last Building Burning, which is due for release on the 19th October 2018 via Wichita Recordings and Carpark Records.

http://