Posts Tagged ‘Froth’

After a two-year hiatus, Froth are back with their most fully realized work to date, ​”Duress”. Co-produced with longtime friend and collaborator Tomas Dolas (Oh Sees/Mr. Elevator) at his analog-focused Studio 22 in Cypress Park, CA, the record is unapologetically experimental yet undeniably accessible – combining some of the band’s strongest hooks with left-field sounds and unexpected flourishes of electronica. Joo Joo Ashworth has matured into a talented producer in his own right, communicating his singular vision through studio technique as much as his angular, Verlaine-inspired guitar sound. As always, the rhythm section of Jeremy Katz and Cameron Allen displays a tightness and sense of mutual understanding only achieved through years of friendship and extensive touring.

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“Duress” sees the band stepping outside the shadow of their influences and into something wholly their own. It’s an impressive and self-assured statement from a group only just entering their prime

Band Members
JooJoo Ashworth- Guitar/VOX
Jeremy Katz- Guitar/bass
Cameron Allen- Drums
released June 7th, 2019

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Los Angeles trio Froth have placed some distance between their days of fake band hijinks (think staged publicity photos and blank vinyl pressings) and the present, announcing the due date of their forthcoming record, “Duress”, out everywhere via Wichita Recordings June 7th. Froth have also shared their first single and music video (dir. Courtney Gavin of The Courtneys) from the project—a grimy-meets-dreamy strummer that, in true prankster fashion, centers around the internet’s infamous Yanny vs. Laurel debate.

“This song is about a guy who listened to the Yanny/Laurel thing and he can only hear Laurel,” the band share in a statement. “He’s really passionate about Laurel being the correct pronunciation to the point where he will die before admitting otherwise. In the end, he reveals that he loves his girlfriend more than he loves the correct pronunciation of ‘Laurel/Yanny.’”

All jokes aside, “Laurel” is a lighthearted foray into shoegaze-soaked noise-rock, offering up the sort of dazed, nostalgic frivolity that reminds you of warming temperatures. Watch the music video for “Laurel”

“Laurel” is the first song shared from our forthcoming album. The title of that album is Duress

Froth have shared a new video today for Shut The Windows. The track is taken from their recent album, Outside (briefly) and is directed by Sean Solomon. The band say: *”When we found out Sean Solomon wanted to do a video for us we were excited because he is a musician/artist that we really respect in LA. The song is a love song but Sean took a more literal meaning of the lyrics and made a really beautiful art piece using windows and doors.”

Froth have spent the majority of 2017 touring and that shows little sign of slowing up as they continue to weave their way across the US before joining Interpol on tour in Europe.

Taken from the album, Outside (briefly) produced by Tomas Dolas available at Wichita Recordings.

FROTH – ” Sensitive Girl “

Posted: February 16, 2017 in MUSIC
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The psychedelic pop band Froth originally started out as a joke. Some band at a house show/ BBQ dropped out last minute so Joojoo and Jeffri wrote some songs last-minute and played. Since then they’ve gotten a lot of media coverage. Hedi Slimane of Saint Laurent chose to feature one of their songs, “General Education,” in his Fall/Winter ‘14 Menswear fashion show and even featured two of the band members as models. Their sound is a dreamy mix of garage rock, shoegaze, and psych-pop. Patterns is their first album, although they recently came out with an EP called Saccharine Sunshine and are working on another EP to debut in April of this year. They’re signed with Burger and Lolipop Records

Froth have released a new video for their track ‘Sensitive Girl’  watch the band’s retro stylings and nostalgia-inducing clip below,  It’s the latest track from the band’s new album ‘OUTSIDE (briefly), released 24th February via Wichita Recordings.

“The video is made of super 8 tour footage we shot around South Africa and Europe,” explains bassist Jeremy Katz. “We borrowed a friends camera and bought 4 rolls of day light film, and then remembered that 90% of days on tour are spent in the van which can be boring for a film. So we tried to have as much fun as we could for the 20 minutes in between getting out of the van and loading in and that’s where most of the footage comes from.

Singer/guitarist Joojoo Ashworth adds: “I like the video a lot because we don’t really make music that you would think ‘oh these guys are silly and have a sense of humor’ but we’re pretty average silly guys and you can kind of see that in the video. Especially with Cameron [Allen, drummer].”

Taken from the forthcoming album, Outside (briefly) produced by Tomas Dolas out on 24th February on Wichita Recordings.

Memories Are Now

Jesca Hoop’s fourth proper solo LP and first for Sub Pop is entitled “Memories Are Now”, a reference to the concept of seizing the day. With producer Blake Mills the album encompasses much of the range of her previous output, which routinely challenged the boundaries of indie rock and folk, encouraging a label more along the lines of unconventional singer/songwriter. It follows her excellent likewise free-spirited but more rustic duet album with Iron and Wire’s Sam Beam “Love Letter For Fire” by less than a year, and any new fans from that collaboration may well delight in its expressiveness right alongside established fans. The empowering title track, which opens the album, is spare yet pointed. Accompanied only by a pulsing bassline, tambourine, and Hoop’s own backing vocals, it plays like an offbeat anthem for the newly self-reliant (“Clear the way/I’m coming through/No matter what you say”). The whole record, in fact, is injected with a heavy dose of gumption and irreverence, a spirit that, deliberate or not, seems timely in the sociopolitical climate of early 2017. Speaking of sociopolitical, the playful “Simon Says” takes on mindless consumerism with campfire immediacy and a twisted twang (“When you don’t pick the words you choose/Involuntarily advertising for their enterprise”). Meanwhile, “Songs of Old” is a folky chamber piece with arguably the album’s best example of Hoop’s distinctive way around a melody or three within a single, haunting tune. Efficient arrangements mark this track and the rest, so much so that when “Unsaid” arrives with electric guitar riffs, more expansive percussion, and poly-rhythms, it hits like a prism.  “Memories Are Now” is exquisite-sounding while it contends with a songwriter who not only has a few things to get off her chest, but seems to make a call to action. With lyrics that reject “that old device called fear,” some will find the inspiration to be catching.

Wildly Idle (Humble Before the Void)

Known in certain circles for backing indie singer/songwriter Kevin Morby on his recent tour, guitarist Meg Duffy steps into the spotlight all on her own with “Wildly Idle” (Humble Before The World) , It’s her full-length debut as the band “Hand Habits” . A true bedroom project  or living room project, to be literal, the album was written, performed, recorded, and produced by Meg Duffy. The intimate set takes listeners behind closed doors with lyrics that refer to bathroom sinks and late-night invites. Frequent double-tracking makes Duffy’s melodic but conversational vocal style seem even more lost in thought past bedtime. Meanwhile, her floaty, psych-tinged guitar pop swirls into corners and wraps back around headphones. Tempos are ambling on tracks such as “Flower Glass” (“When I hold you like a flower/Hold you like an hourglass”), a melancholy reflection that, even without the suggestion of the title, sounds like a musical representation of stained glass. Sustained chords, mixed low, provide the glue for layered harmonic guitars that unroll one note at a time in irregular rhythms. Later, the whispered count-off to “Sun Beholds Me” leaves ample time to anticipate the next beat. Even a relatively brighter, brisker tune like “Nite Life” has the leisurely twang of slide guitar, spacy effects, and airy vocals. Three brief “scenes” are spread throughout the track list: “Great LA,” “Cowboy,” and “Time Hole.” Incorporating samples, each one is an atmospheric exercise in texture that relinquishes form, only reinforcing the dreamy, drifting feel of the album.

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The Brian Jonestown Massacre “Dropping Bombs On The Sun” is the final and third of 3 singles from the forthcoming album “Don’t Get Lost” to be released in February 2017. The first track Dropping Bombs On The Sun  features vocals by longtime collaborator Tess Parks, this track gives an idea of the changing rhythms of the Brian Jonestown Massacre for the new album. Of a mellow flow of strings and keyboards, with smoky vocals provided by Tess Parks. Geldenes Herz Menz features Pete Fraser (The Pogues .New Young Pony Club) on saxophone , both Dan Alliare (drums and Ricky Maymi (guitar) from the Brian Jonestown Massacre play on both tracks.

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“Caught In Still Life” is the debut album release from London band Vaults. Whilst not yet a household name the band have been quietly building momentum since signing to Virgin EMI in 2013. The album contains two songs which are very well known; One Last Night featured on the soundtrack to 50 Shades Of Grey and went to No.1 on iTunes in 20 countries. Secondly comes the bands beautiful version of Randy Crawford’s “One Day I’ll Fly Away” as featured in this year’s much anticipated John Lewis Christmas ad. The TV ad was viewed 7 million times in the first 24 hours. Also featured on the album are Cry No More and Premonitions, both of which featured heavily in the Channel 4 drama Glue. For fans of Kate Bush, Florence, London Grammar and Chvrches.

A Pink Sunset for No One

“A Pink Sunset For No One” is the follow-up to “Fantastic Planet” , the 2015 album from guitarist/filmmaker Sarah Lipstates solo project Noveller. While the album contains all of the hallmarks of Lipstate’s cinematic sound, such as gently drifting waves of droning guitars and slightly melancholy atmospheres, there seems to be more definition to her playing this time around, in some aspects.

She hasn’t exactly started writing pop songs, but at times there’s a bit more of a propulsion to her compositions, and the melodies feel more outlined than before. It’s hard to tell exactly what instruments or effects pedals she’s using, since the liner notes don’t reveal any of this information, but there are moments that sound like organs, and others that seem like sampled woodwinds (on closing track “Emergence”). On “Rituals,” there are even shades of vocals peeking out from the detached but swinging rhythm and post-punk-influenced chords. The album’s title track starts calmly, with chiming notes, before louder guitars burst out. While not quite as harshly distorted as some earlier of Novellers works like Red Rainbows, the album demonstrates that Lipstate is still masterful at applying heavier guitar effects at exactly the right moments, elevating the lush, dreamy atmospheres to an exciting next level. Standout track “Trails and Trials” does this as well, and her guitar playing sounds particularly close to early His Name Is Alive on this one. Without getting too gloomy, She creates haunted, mysterious atmospheres on tracks such as “Corridors,” which could easily be the theme to the next big horror or sci-fi series. With this her eighth proper solo album as Noveller,  Lipstate continues to push her otherworldly sound in fascinating new directions.

Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins

Is Chuck Prophet a storyteller who just happens to be a great musician? Or is he a talented songwriter and guitarist who also has a real gift for spinning tales? On 2017’s Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins, his 12th studio album, Prophet has managed to strike an ideal balance between the two sides, delivering a tuneful and engaging set that’s full of character sketches with a full complement of heart, soul, honesty, wit, and the details of a recognizable adult life. Prophet is capable of playfully imagining what it would be like to be the star of Nashville and Friday Night Lights (“If I Was Connie Britton”), then sharing the true story of a young man gunned down by the San Francisco police for no clear reason just a few tracks later (“Alex Nieto”). Both songs come off as smart, honest, and thoughtful despite their very different tone, and those adjectives apply to nearly every cut on this album. The current state of music is a recurring theme here, as evidenced by the title tune, “Bad Year for Rock and Roll,” “We Got Up and Played,” and “In the Mausoleum” (the latter an homage to the late Alan Vega of Suicide). But Prophet is just as interested in the lives of people in all sorts of trouble. A single mother and a gunman unexpectedly cross paths in “Killing Machine,” the author ponders the objects of his affection in “Your Skin” and “Coming Out in Code,” the peaks and valleys of romantic relationships are examined in “Open Up Your Heart,” and the Son of God’s consumer preferences get a rundown in “Jesus Was a Social Drinker.” Prophet and his studio band (including Tubes drummer Prairie Prince and co-producers Brad Jones and Matt Winegar on various instruments) give the melodies a rich, wide-ranging sound, and Prophet has rarely been better as a vocalist, finding the right tone on every track. Along with having one of the best titles of recent memory, “Bobby Fuller Died for Your Sins” confirms that more than 25 years after making his solo debut, Chuck Prophet remains one of America’s strongest songwriters and recording artists, and he’s in great form here.

Outside (Briefly)

Froth have come a long way since their joke-band beginnings, weedy garage rock first album, and their initial foray into shoegaze on their 2014 album Bleak, which showed a great deal of promise with a batch of good songs and an impressively full sound. 2017’s Outside (Briefly) cashes in on that potential and ends up sounding like a great lost shoegaze/dream pop/experimental rock album of the early ’90s. Mixing the guitar overload of bands like My Bloody Valentine, the experimental nature of the Swirlies, and the hazy wistfulness of bands like Slowdive, Froth manage to ingest a ton of influences without sounding in thrall to any of them in particular. Lots of times on albums as stuck in the past as Outside (Briefly) is, the nostalgia factor weighs it down too much, the endless rounds of spot-the-influence make it impossible to actually enjoy the music as it happens, or the listener is so transported back in time that they’d rather listen to something old instead of the music Froth is making. None of that happens here. The band’s leader JooJoo Ashworth never succumbs to hero worship or pastiche. He and his cohorts (guitarist Nick Ventura, drummer Cameron Allen, and bassist Jeremy Katz) mix and match sounds, styles, and approaches like masters, never allowing the album to get predictable or obvious. Tracks like “Passing” defy the listener to pin down exactly what’s happening. It starts off as a raging shoegaze rocker that could have been lifted off an early Slumberland Records 45, then suddenly shifts into a droning Motorik jam where Ashworth and Ventura’s guitars noodle and dance like hippie girls at a Phish concert. After a few minutes of zoning out, the song crashes back into life before ending in a blast of feedback. It’s an exhilarating arrangement and serves notice that the band isn’t about to be pinned down. They can do slow noise rock ballads (“Petals”) that start off sparse and scattered sounding, with Ashworth’s fragile vocals up front, then finish in waves of synth strings and organ swirls or do simple blown-out shoegaze (“Romance Distractions”). They nail both abrasive JAMC-sleek rockers (“New Machine”) and fuzzy indie pop (“Sensitive Girl”) with equal aplomb. Synth pop drones (“Contact”) sound just as good as the songs that mix new wave melodies with noise pop guitars (“Show a Flower a Candle and It Grows”). Basically, everything Ashworth and crew try on Outside (Briefly) works a charm, sounding like the entire history of noisy indie pop wrapped up in one constantly surprising, effortlessly appealing ball of sound. Anyone who has a soft spot for sensitive pop songs played by loud guitars that are run through a ton of effects will want to check the album out. It may not make people forget the past mighty heroes of noise, but a few spins through Outside (Briefly) is enough to make room in the shoegaze/dream pop pantheon for Froth.

There’s something quietly reassuring about the slow rise of Los Angeles quartet Froth. The gentlest wave of hype has greeted their first two albums, they’ve toured hard, and now with confirmation this week that they’ve signed to Wichita Recordings.

We’ll have to wait until February to hear the bands third long player, Outside (Briefly) , but they have this week given us a taster, in the shape of new single, Contact. Starting with a clip of an interstellar space chat, you’d be forgiven for thinking it was a new track from Public Service Broadcasting, but once the motorik groove and pulsing bass kick in you’re into an altogether psychier-place, the sort of record Hookworms would make if they were feeling particularly mellow. Froth have spoken about dialling back the noise on this record; if the songwriting is as good as this, that might just reveal something spectacular.

Outside (briefly) is out February 10th via Wichita Recordings. Froth tour Europe next month,

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Froth – “Postcard Radio” from their forthcoming album, Bleak,

Burger Records has existed since 2007, but the label’s truly grown in popularity over the last two years. Between tons of releases, throwing festivals in different cities, a seemingly endless roster, and a constant profile in the  New York Times, it’s hard to believe the dudes who run the label get any sleep at all. It’s easy to become a band that gets lost within Burger’s primarily garage-rock roster, however LA four-piece Froth’s 60s-inspired, catchy, shoe-gaze surf rock have always made the band a standout gem.

We’re premiering Froth’s new song for “Postcard Radio,” which is the perfect song to listen to while hanging out of a car window, and eating a donut while wearing sweet sunglasses when the summer comes.

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