Posts Tagged ‘Brisbane’

The Goon Sax

Still in high school when they made their first album Up To Anything in 2016, their brand of awkwardly transcendent teenage guitar pop took them into end of year lists for BBC6, Billboard and Rough Trade, and earned them raves from the Guardian, Pitchfork, Spin, Uncut, Rolling Stone and elsewhere. According to Metacritic, Up To Anything was the 8th best-reviewed debut album anywhere in the world in 2016.

Up To Anything, their 2016 debut from Brisbane, Australia group The Goon Sax, was a brilliant reminder of indie pop’s effectiveness when it’s distilled to its simplest form: loose, jangling guitars and wry, understated vocals. But when it came time for the trio to record what became their second album, We’re Not Talking, each member of the band found themselves pondering the definition of “pop,” and how it related to the ways they wanted to develop their sound.

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“Pop’s a really odd thing,” says bassist/guitarist/vocalist Louis Forster (who is the son of Robert Forster of The Go-Betweens). “I think some people just see [pop] as something sounding polished and ultimately very accessible. But I think pop’s something that exists in a lot of forms, in all kinds of music. On jazz records, there are parts that are really poppy. I guess our idea of pop is a very westernized thing, and it comes out in funny forms; to me, [pop] satisfies something human and subconscious—or it should.”

Accordingly, We’re Not Talkingbalances the band’s usual laser-focused emotional acuity and economical instrumentation with a more expansive take on pop formalism. The keening opening song, “Make Time 4 Love,” boasts insistent cowbell, delicate strings, and jaunty horns; “Sleep EZ” joins delicate, harmony-rich choruses indebted to ‘80s U.K. dreampop to a contorted bridge that boasts a spurt of disco-punk beats, wherein Forster stutter-sings like a skipping LP; and the fierce, emotionally wrecked highlight “She Knows” charges forward on turbulent strings and livewire bass grooves. Even the more straightforward, strummy acoustic-pop songs boast more (and different) hues; the lovely “We Can’t Win,” for example, adds mournful piano and glassy twinkles of percussion into the mix.

“We wanted to make this record more collaboratively,” says Forster. “We had more ideas and more things that we wanted to try out.”

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We’re Not Talking shows how much can change between the ages of 17 and 19. It’s a record that takes the enthusiasms of youth and twists them into darker, more sophisticated shapes, full of lines like “When the bus went past your house and past your stop my eyes filled with tears” and “I’ve got a few things above my bed but it feels so empty, I’ve got spaces to fill and we’re not talking.” Relationships are now laced with hesitation, remorse, misunderstanding and ultimately compassion.

Strings, horns, even castanets sneak their way onto the album, but We’re Not Talking isn’t glossy throwaway pop. Sounds stick out at surprising angles, cow-bells become lead instruments and brief home-recorded fragments appear unexpectedly. This is a record made by restless artists, defying expectations as if hardly noticing, and its complexity makes We’re Not Talking even more of a marvel.

Forster and his bandmates bassist/guitarist James Harrison and drummer/vocalist Riley Jones were determined to push themselves on We’re Not Talking. Forster cites Scott Walker’s Scott 4 and the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds as inspirations, as well as the work of ESG, Liquid Liquid, and Jenny Hval. “I really like how [Jenny Hval’s] record had those bits where everything sort of drops back, and it’s just spoken word,” he explains. “We were very obsessed with making something very honest, and she does that really, really well in her lyrics. They’re incredible.”

Jones spent much of the recording sessions trying to funnel her love for Tall Dwarfs’ Chris Knox into the final product. “I’d always be like, ‘Chris Knox reference, Chris Knox reference,’” she laughs, “and it just didn’t really come across. I don’t know if anyone else was behind [the idea], but I was just very inspired by him as a pop songwriter.”

The slippery definition of “pop music” was another topic of intra-band debate during the recording process. On Talking, the group worked with outside producers—Architecture In Helsinki vocalist Cameron Bird and the band’s former drummer/keyboardist/guitarist James Cecil.

“We wanted it to be more polished and poppier than the last [album],” Jones says. “We tried to explain to them what we wanted, but I think they really had different ideas about it, so it was a bit tough sometimes. We were all pushing for things, and we couldn’t communicate or couldn’t find a middle ground.”

Those clashing ideas didn’t undermine the final product, but they did give the band more insight into the ways they approach their career—and the possibilities available to them as a result. “When I said we wanted it to be more poppy,’ they were like, ‘OK, poppy,’ and then they had this completely different idea of pop,” Jones recalls. “I just had no idea that things could be that clean and so produced.”

Adds Forster: “Sometimes you forget that there are words that other people have a very different version of, you know? To us, ‘pop’ probably meant something worlds away from what other people would think. We think quite similarly sometimes, the three of us—we often think that because all three of us are on the same wavelength about something, it must be very obvious to anybody else, when it’s not.”

This deep, personal connection dates back to before the Goon Sax’s 2013 inception, when Forster and Harrison forged a fast friendship thanks to their shared musical interests (the Raincoats, the Clean, the Fall, Marine Girls) and—to borrow Jones’ phrasing similarly “silly” personalities; five years in, those personal bonds continue to provide a much-needed buffer against the trials of being in a band. “After the last tour, I was like, ‘Oh my God, can’t wait to get away from these guys,’” Jones recalls, adding with a laugh: “[I was] really ready for break, and then on day two, I was like, ‘Hey guys, are you doing anything today? Do you want to hang out, maybe?’ I just missed them.”

As the Goon Sax gear up for yet another tour—they’ll be spending the fall playing throughout England and North America—they remain cognizant of (and confident about) where they want their band to go in the future. To that end, We’re Not Talking is not so much a bridge to the next career milestone: it’s more like a roadmap.

“I definitely learned that I don’t want anyone to tell me what to do anymore,” Jones says. “We really thought, like, ‘Oh, we’re young, we probably need some grown-ups giving us some good advice.’ But I just want to be free to create stuff naturally, and to push it really far.”

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This Brisbane-based group taps into the mystic energies of both ‘60s flower power and the 1980s days of wine and roses. Their organ has a nasty bite, their guitars leak fuel all over the place, the drums soundtrack a “youth in revolt” movie. With disaffected alternative vocals moaning lines like “listen up, disengage, fade away” over wah-wah pedals and sitar, it’s not hard to figure out what shrines they worship at. Still, on Trail to Find, they mix together the mysterious and the upbeat with unfettered verve.

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Mallrat

Mallrat’s new EP, In the Sky, bottles up emotion and hands it to you in a dreamy, electro-pop vial. The music she makes is personal, nostalgic. But it’s music for the world, and the world is drinking it up. In The Sky drops this week, Mallrat aka is 19 year old Brisbane local, Grace Shaw and to discuss a love of things that feel old, making the move to L.A, and the ins and outs of her new EP (which she promises is miles ahead of her last one). In the Sky is from a song by The Orwells a song she loved so when she needed a name, when I heard it, it just felt really angsty and like a 90s teen movie. I just love the 90s so I thought it seemed like a good fit.

The rat has become kind of like a symbol for you. Is that just from your name mallrat? Is there any other meaning. Well when I was little my teeth were crooked and I went to my parents and I was like“look, I’m a rat” and they were like “ah, she needs braces”. They took me to the orthodontist and they were like, “quick, we have to fix this issue”.

Mallrat says I think the production on it is sick so I’m really excited for people to listen to it with their headphones on and just find new things they like about all of the songs. And I think all the song are really different to each other as well. But yeah, I love it. So, with the first EP, it was my first time making music. They were literally the first six songs I ever made. So I was figuring it out as I went. I wrote all the lyrics and the melodies but I was just being sent beats on SoundCloud to use. Whereas, with this EP, I co-produced everything. I was a lot more involved in the whole process, which is cool.

In The Sky tracklist Groceries, what’s it about? Mallrat says it’s funny because most of my songs, I don’t mean them to be about anything. It just like ends up feeling like something. But this one, I guess, you could say is about something. It’s about having a crush but not wanting to have a crush on someone. Being like, this is so annoying, I don’t want this. I love being independent, so when you really like someone it can be annoying.

Texas. It’s just a bit emo. And it’s about wanting someone to be well but they’re just struggling. Better. The same thing. Just wanting the best for somebody. UFO is about feeling like an alien. I don’t know how to explain it. Like, I’m sure everybody feels like this sometimes, I don’t feel as if I’m like any of these people. I love all of these people but there’s just something that feels very different. I think I could be from another planet, maybe that’s the only logical explanation.  Make Time is my favourite. I don’t know what it’s about. It’s just very calming.

Because I think a lot of people when they write, they want to create a storyline with a character and you get to see where the character is going like a story. But for me, I would just rather pull an emotion, bottle up an emotion that people can listen to and attach to their own narratives, and be like, “oh that’s me”.

In The Sky is out June 1st via Dew Process. released May 31st, 2018

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Jungle Giants are back for their third album, “Quiet Ferocity”, and let’s just say, it’s anything but quiet.

Sam Hales and co have created a fun, jangly release that surely holds hits that will see you through to the warm summer months. Opener On Your Way Down is solid, with its catchy beats and riffs, and a chorus you just won’t be able to get out of your head. Feel The Way I Do finds some of that ferocity mentioned in the title, a tight number that you can already picture crowds bopping their head to.

Quiet Ferocity marks a change in concept for The Jungle Giants, with Hales taking to the producers chair for the first time. What results is an album that focuses on quality over quantity, choosing to build the record through their musical ability rather than a multi-layered approach that is so often hard to translate into a live environment. Tracks like People Always Say and Time And Time Again show maturity and growth in The Jungle Giants sound and it’s easy to hear that producing the works themselves has influenced their updated sound. Look out for Used To Be In Love and the eponymous Talking Heads-eque Quiet Ferocity, they’ll be with you for days.

Frontman Sam Hales has given us a track-by-track breakdown of the album, explaining the inspirations and stories behind each of Quiet Ferocity‘s 10 tracks.

‘On Your Way Down’

One of the main sonic identifiers on the album, On Your Way Down showcases the band’s ability to combine simple arrangements with melodic intensity. “It makes you want to dance, but also clench your fists,” Sam says. “When I wrote it I knew it was going on the record and everything else would have to make room for this song and nod towards it.”

On Your Way Down is one of the main sonic identifiers for me on the record. It has a simple arrangement, though melodically it’s very intense. I love how it makes you want to dance, but also clench your fists.

‘Feel The Way I Do’

Feel The Way I Do combines charging dance hooks with a contagious scream-your-lungs-out chorus. “The song came from nowhere and I wrote it start to finish. I just had to get it down. It felt like a gift.”

I’ll never forget the day I wrote this song. I always test out a song by dancing to it and when this song appeared to me out of nowhere it made me dance so hard. I saved it 19 times in different folders on my computer because I was scared I was going to lose it.

‘Bad Dream’

‘Bad Dream’ was the last song written for the record. We were having a party at my house. I hadn’t show anyone the song and then I played it over the speakers and everyone was like, ‘That should be on the record!’ And then it was.

‘Used To Be In Love’

When we first recorded this song it wasn’t even a dance song. The song was being super stubborn and I told it, ‘If you don’t want to get on the bus and go to the beach with everyone else then you can stay at home.’ But then we put a 4 x 4 dance pattern in the song and it became something else entirely.

‘Quiet Ferocity’

And then there’s Quiet Ferocity, the album’s title with its massive bass lines that lead into the nostalgic hell-yeah chorus: ‘when we get together/I forget the time’ before right-turning into 3am eyes closed where-are-my-limbs-wait-I-want-to-kiss-you territory.

I wanted huge ass repetitive bass lines that were really aesthetically pleasing. I love how this song has barely any lyrics, and how at the end it takes a complete right turn to dance town.

‘Time and Time Again’

Cesira is a guitar nerd. I realised I was writing three lead guitar lines into the song at once, and then I thought, ‘Why not!’ It’s going to be fun to play live.

‘Waiting For a Sign’

I’m really proud of this song. It formulated like a pop song but it feels like a slow burner. It’s hectic but still retains its chill. It’s got a lot of lyrics and that’s something I don’t often do.

‘Blinded’

Blinded is our Madonna moment. In the studio we were playing with the production elements trying to improve it and then we said, ‘Fuck it. Lets go Madonna.’ When I showed it to Mum she said it sound like ABBA and I was like, ‘Yes, this is what’s happening.’

‘In The Garage’

I really like how people include instrumentals in their records and I wanted to do that too. It’s great being in a different mindset. You don’t have to follow the normal rules you use to make a song. I’m into this song because it shows off all the sounds that are relevant to the album.

‘People Always Say’

People Always Say, Sam says, “Initially, the song wasn’t even going to make the album.” He’d tried so hard he’d over produced it, but the band agreed there was something about it they liked. In the studio, they worked together and simplified it but something was still missing. So Sam pulled out a synth and began hitting different keys. Cesira and Keelan and Dooris would yell, “Yes!” and then “No!” They worked together until they were all screaming, “Yes!” and they knew they’d found the sound. It was a happy accident,” Sam says. “But we had a lot of those, working together. It was awesome and validating, all of us being there in the studio on the same level. It’s the deepest dance-driven song on the record and that’s why we put it last. It felt like a full stop, like we’d built people up to the point where all we could do was say goodbye, until next time.”

‘People Always Say’ is the deepest dance-driven song on the record and that’s why we put it last. It felt like a full stop, like we’d built people up to the point where all we could do was say goodbye, until next time.

Quiet Ferocity is a brilliant reflection of everything the band have released so far, but most of all, it showcases their evolution. Through combining elements of their earlier releases, the four-piece have really started to carve out their sound, with lead vocalist, guitarist and writer Sam Hales producing some of his best work to date with the help of band mates, Cesira Aitken, Andrew Dooris and Keelan Bijker.

THE_JUNGLE_GIANTS_Quite_Ferocity_itunes

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This group of teenagers from Brisbane could be your favorite new band. The Goon Sax frontman Louis Forster sings with a David Byrne-like delivery when he says the line that won me over, to his tenuous lover: “Let’s get nervous in your room again.” That’s the moment I turned up the volume.

As often as songs tackle the subject of love, (the wanting, the yearning, the rejection) what’s often missing is earnestness. The Goon Sax are full of that and a dose of humor as well. “Make Time 4 Love” is a song about defeat. Louis Forster wrote to say it’s also about “learning to live with yourself and accepting that everyone’s impulses seem irrational to someone else.”

Musically the Australian trio of James Harrison, Louis Forster and Riley Jones, takes creative impulse from ’80s, punky dance bands. “It was really inspired by [the bands] ESG and Liquid, Liquid, who we were all listening to a whole lot. And we just wanted to make the song really dancey.” In fact, Louis Forster’s dad was in a band from that time period that did pretty well, The Go-Betweens.

The video for “Make Time 4 Love” is directed by Ryan Daniel Browne and is inspired in part by a 1926 animated German fairytale, The Adventures of Prince Achmed, as well as by the 1968 Hungarian animated short, The Kidnapping of the Sun and the Moon.The video takes place in three worlds,” says Louis Forster. “Wicked, regular, and a third – removed fantasy.” It also draws some of its dark imagery from album art. “The album covers of Tilt and The Drift by Scott Walker were another critical clue for us, and Riley actually bought a copy of Tilt on tour which we listened to and it got us in the right head space.”

Taken from the fothcoming album, We’re Not Talking (out September 14th on LP, CD and digital) via Wichita Recordings and Chapter Music

The Goon Sax are headed to UK/Europe in September/October to celebrate the September 14th release of their second album We’re Not Talking.

The five songs on the debut EP from Brisbane musician Hatchie radiate sunshine. That’s not as easy a feat as it sounds: tip too far in the direction of sunny pop music and the results end up saccharine and cloying; if you try to overcorrect, you end up with the kind of half-hearted songs that feint toward hookiness without ever truly connecting. But Hatchie walks the tightrope, and every minute of Sugar & Spice is fully engaging and almost impossibly heartwarming. The big, sun-bleeding-over-the-horizon guitar chords that open “Sure” give way to a vocal melody that bobs as lazily and gracefully as a beach ball on the surface of a swimming pool. The title track leavens its rush of Fun Dip synths with a heartsick chorus that somersaults up and down the octave. Throughout the EP, Hatchie demonstrates masterful control of her voice, gliding into a cotton-candy-cloud falsetto and then back down into a warm caramel alto, giving the songs a kind of weightlessness and buoyancy—the running start she takes into the bridge of “Sugar & Spice” gives the finale a multicolor, firework-style rush. There are precedents here if you want to spot them—The Cranberries, Cocteau Twins—but Sugar & Spice wriggles off those simple touchstones the more you listen to it to become something entirely its own. Even the regret that powers the tumbling closer “Bad Guy,” in Hatchie’s hands, sounds like optimism.

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With more than a hint of early Depeche Mode and The Cocteau Twins) – shoegazy guitars alongside Bunnymen riffs, as Harriette Pilbeam effortlessly layers knock-out hooks alongside dreamy vocals and radio-friendly tunes.

Hatchie’s utterly perfect new EP Sugar & Spice might remind you of The Cranberries and Natalie Imbruglia both names are meant as deep compliments. But instead , I’ll go with Cocteau Twins whose Robin Guthrie has already remixed a song from Sugar and The Sundays, but even those fall short in capturing the album’s radiant, sparkling beauty. So let’s forego comparisons altogether and say this instead: that Hatchie  aka Harriette Pillbeam has the kind of graceful knack for pop hooks that artists twice her age would sell their souls for. Step inside her mind; a dreamy landscape where cascading synths, jangling guitars, propulsive rhythms and white noise undulate beneath irresistible pop melodies.

The EP moves from triumph to triumph: in “Sure,” Hatchie’s voice skips through a glistening field of guitars, pausing only to ricochet her voice up and up and up the octave on the chorus. She see-saws up and down, from high register to deep alto, on the verses to the title track, the chorus of which is as sticky-sweet and elastic as pulled taffy. But the runaway winner on an EP full of stunners comes at the end; on “Bad Guy,” Hatchie modulates her voice so it lands somewhere between pained longing and calm resolution, and the way the chorus spills from her lips short, breathless syllable after short, breathless syllable adds to the song’s nervous momentum. That the album runs a short 20 minutes is Sugar & Spice’s only drawback as you want more, but that’s a minor quibble; Hatchie could write an album three times as long, and it would still feel like it was over too soon.

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Released May 25th, 2018

There’s a lot going on for The Goon SaxShe Knows, the scorching first single from their wonderful and devastating second album We’re Not Talking has just been released. The album is available from the lovely people at Wichita recordings

The band are about to embark on a European tour with Franke Cosmos, a sold out headline show in London and their first US tour.

The Goon Sax are James Harrison, Louis Forster and Riley Jones from Brisbane. The band were Still in high school when they made their first album Up To Anything in 2016, their brand of awkwardly transcendent teenage guitar pop took them into end of year lists for BBC 6Music, Billboard and Rough Trade, and earned them rave reviews from the Guardian, Pitchfork, Spin, Uncut, Rolling Stone and elsewhere. According to Metacritic, Up To Anything was the 8th best-reviewed debut album anywhere in the world in 2016.

We are beyond delighted to welcome The Goon Sax to the Wichita family!

The Goon Sax are James Harrison, Louis Forster and Riley Jones from Brisbane, Australia.

Still in high school when they made their first album Up To Anything in 2016, their brand of awkwardly transcendent teenage guitar pop took them into end of year lists for BBC6, Billboard and Rough Trade, and earned them raves from the Guardian, Pitchfork, Spin, Uncut, Rolling Stone and elsewhere. According to Metacritic, Up To Anything was the 8th best-reviewed debut album anywhere in the world in 2016.

The Goon Sax toured UK and Europe twice on that record, played shows with Whitney, US Girls, Teenage Fanclub, Twerps and Blank Realm, graduated school, and then turned their focus to album number two. They flew to Melbourne to record with James Cecil and Cameron Bird, respectively former/current members of Architecture In Helsinki.
Upcoming album We’re Not Talking shows how much can change between the ages of 17 and 19. It’s a record that takes the enthusiasms of youth and twists them into darker, more sophisticated shapes, full of lines like “When the bus went past your house and past your stop my eyes filled with tears” and “I’ve got a few things above my bed but it feels so empty, I’ve got spaces to fill and we’re not talking.” Relationships are now laced with hesitation, remorse, misunderstanding and ultimately compassion. 

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Strings, horns, even castanets sneak their way onto the album, but We’re Not Talking isn’t glossy throwaway pop. Sounds stick out at surprising angles, cow-bells become lead instruments and brief home-recorded fragments appear unexpectedly. This is a record made by restless artists, defying expectations as if hardly noticing, and its complexity makes We’re Not Talking even more of a marvel.

Releases September 14th, 2018
The Band
James – Guitar, Bass, keys, Vocals
Riley – Percussion, Vocals
Louis – Guitar, Bass, keys, Vocals
Lizzie Welsh – Violin
Biddy Connor – Viola
Madison Foley – TrumpetAll songs written by The Goon Sax. 

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With her debut UK live shows just days away, Brisbane newcomer Hatchie has shared a fourth track and accompanying video from her debut EP, ‘Sugar & Spice’, which comes out on May 25th via Heavenly Recordings.

The new track, ‘Sleep‘, continues to delve into Harriette Pilbeam’s introspective world where daydreams meet a shimmering soundtrack of bright synths, jangling guitars and deliciously bittersweet vocals, we are big fans: “Sleep is about feeling frustrated with someone who can’t communicate their feelings,” she explains. “In this song I’m trying to coax someone into talking to me by any means necessary, even if it means visiting me in dreams.”

On the accompanying video she comments: “We decided to play on the idea that I’m trying to get someone to communicate with me in their sleep. We made a bunch of dreamy sets to focus on, like I’m talking to them in their dreams. At some points I’m really serious, at other points I’m almost teasing them because I’m so over trying to get them to talk.”

Speaking of the EP, Pilbeam says: “After writing music that never felt cohesive or special enough to warrant its own venture, ‘Try’ marked a shift in my writing style I wasn’t expecting. I wrote it in early 2015, followed quickly by ‘Sleep’ and ‘Sugar & Spice’. They were written more for myself than for a specific project, in an effort to explore feelings of vulnerability and ecstasy I had previously suppressed. I wanted these songs to sound lush, sparkly, and recreate euphoric feelings I experienced falling in love for the first time. I reworked my demos with Joe Agius, whose production and writing additions achieved the perfect sound I was searching for, giving me confidence to start taking the songs more seriously and continue writing.

The songs on ‘Sugar & Spice’ were all written without much thought or pressure from myself or anyone else, allowing me to lay my feelings out like I’ve never done before. Joe & producer John Castle helped shape the sound you can hear in each track, bringing life to each song in its own special way.”

The release comes hot off the back of a remarkable nine months for Hatchie. After signing to Ivy League Records for Australia/New Zealand, Heavenly Recordings for UK/Europe and Double Double Whammy/Polyvinyl for North America, and recent performances at SXSW, the international demand will see Hatchie embark on a huge run of shows. The UK leg in May will take in festivals such as Live at Leeds, Liverpool Sound City and The Great Escape as well as a string of London shows.

‘Sugar & Spice’ EP track list:
1. Sure (official video | Robin Guthrie remix)
2. Sleep (official video)
3. Sugar & Spice (official video)
4. Try (official video)
5. Bad Guy


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